you really can use a car transport trailer!



you really can use a car transport trailer!

Postby grumpyvette » November 30th, 2008, 9:33 pm

one of the facts of life is that high performance cars tend to break down,
COMPONENTS FAIL, AND CARS NEED TRANSPORT WHEN THEY ARE NOT EASILY DRIVABLE, AND YOULL OCCASIONALLY FIND AMAZING BARGAINS ON PROJECT CARS, OR OLDER MUSCLE CARS THAT CAN,T BE DRIVEN

Yes I know your so tempted to just rent a trailer from some place like U-haul when you need one!
the problem with that is they are not always available and in my area a car trailer rents for about $80 for 24 hours PLUS $23 for full insurance on the trailer, and they won,t let you tow with a car, you NEED a truck, and they will tell you most pick-ups are not set up correctly to tow. check the daily rate on the trailer rental, and its usually a good idea to have a truck with great brakes, preferably a dually, be darn sure the vehicle you tow with is a good deal heavier than the combined weight of the trailer and car on it.
and get a trailer that has FULLY FUNCTIONAL BRAKES AND LIGHTS, THAT YOU ACTUALLY TEST WORK.
by the time you calculate the time and fuel to go get the trailer,return the trailer and rental fees youll be doing damn good if you spend less than $150-$200 to rent a trailer and if you do it frequently the cost adds up fast to well past the point owning a trailer even if you only use it 4-5 times a year makes economic sense, especially when you can usually find a decent used car trailer from between $1200-$1800
READ THIS RELATED THREAD
viewtopic.php?f=87&t=4318&p=32725&hilit=trailer+project+state#p32725

I'D ALSO POINT OUT THAT IF YOU BUY A DECENT CAR TRAILER ITS A VERY GOOD IDEA TO WELD d-RINGS ALONG THE AREAS REQUIRED TO SECURE THE CAR WITH THE PROPER LOCK DOWN TOOLS AND ADDING THINGS LIKE A WINCH OR BETTER LIGHTING OR BETTER BRAKES MAKES THE TRAILER FAR EASIER TO WORK WITH

MANY LOW GROUND CLEARANCE CARS , LIKE CORVETTES AND COBRAS WON,T LOAD EASILY ON A STOCK U-HAUL trailer without some longer ramps or they high center and damage the under car areas
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and your car rarely breaks down sitting in your driveway when it does and youll rarely have the correct tools and parts with you so getting it back to your garage usually includes towing charges UNLESS you own a car trailer, now obviously you can buy one but if your skilled and own a welder you can usually build a nice one for less than 60% of the normal cost.
your also going to find a frequent need for you and your friends too transport larger and rather heavy components like engines, transmissions, frames, rear differentials and other components at times that won,t easily fit an an average car trunk, making owning a trailer capable of transporting those parts with a good selection of (d-rings_welded along the outer frame) and chains and binding clamps and a winch, to be used to safely secure those parts for transport much easier, a huge advantage in this hobby, and don,t forget you'll need an engine crane or over head hoist to unload the trailer and a garage or shop door and floor space that will allow you to back that trailer in far enough to access that load of components
Ive purchased and sold a couple over the years my current ones well used but looks like this one, and cost me $1200
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this is where a decent MIG welder comes in handy
If you shop carefully and don,t jump on the first deal you see you are likely to find you can get a decent used car trailer at a decent price.
I can,t imagine being serious in this hobby and not owning or at least having access too a decent car transport trailer as your always going to need to move non running cars or transport project cars or major components.
be aware that theres always guys getting divorced, or having to take out of state jobs etc. and you can frequently find a basic USED car transport trailer for $600-$1500.
but be aware youll also need a decent tow vehicle , I bought a trailer and a decent DUAL REAR WHEEL truck, then swapped the truck for a chevy avalanche , but recently gave that to my younger son. so now I need to track him down for access when I need to tow the trailer.
know that owning a decent trailer has easily paid for itself in not needed towing fees many times over, in several years and its frequently used to rescue both my friends cars that break down, and to go get parts and project cars.


viewtopic.php?f=27&t=7810&p=26824#p26824

http://2loose.chevytalk.org/cherrypicker.html

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=87&t=4318&p=18620&hilit=state+trailer#p18620

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=87&t=4598&p=12268&hilit=state+trailer#p12268

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=44&t=340&p=416&hilit=state+trailer#p416

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=61&t=593&p=779&hilit=towing+hooks#p779

READ THESE RELATED THREADS THERE,S A GREAT DEAL MORE RELATED INFO IN THOSE LINKS
viewtopic.php?f=27&t=25&p=5753&hilit=trailer#p5753

viewtopic.php?f=27&t=3508

viewtopic.php?f=27&t=6405&p=20131#p20131

viewtopic.php?f=62&t=340&p=416&hilit=+trailer+lights#p416

viewtopic.php?f=87&t=4318

http://www.tjtrailers.com/store/trailer ... rints.html

viewtopic.php?f=87&t=4318&p=32725&hilit=out+of+state#p32725

http://www.tjtrailers.com/store/car-carrier-trailer-plans-18x80.html

http://www.oklahomatrailersales.com/carhauler.asp

http://www.terrystrailers.com/

http://www.trailerplans.com//index.php?option=com_virtuemart&page=shop.browse&category_id=13&Itemid=2

http://www.plans-for-you.com/trailer.html

http://www.jcwhitney.com/autoparts/ItemBrowse/c-10101/s-10101/p-100000169592/mediaCode-ZX/appId-100000169592/Pr-p_CATENTRY_ID:100000169592

ONE OTHER FACTOR to KEEP IN MIND, IS THOSE DEALS YOULL ON OCCASION SEE!
owning or having access to a trailer or flat bed is a huge plus in this hobby, ,keep in mind more than just a car can be transported, my trailer has over the years had many an engine or welder or rear differential transported too or from locations
and many "deals " on project cars or parts depend on your ability to move heavy non drivable cars or parts quickly before the owner has time to reconsider his selling them when his temporarily frustrated, because hes less likely to sell when the wife quits nagging or hes had time to think things thru

I purchased a car trailer just because of those super deals you occasionally get on those NON-running cars and 1/2 finished projects that you can get for low bucks IF you can haul them home before the owner regains his sense of the cars worth, and before he losses that pissed off feeling that gets you that low price


http://www.welders-direct.com/merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=WD&Product_Code=907312

http://www.welders-direct.com/merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=WD&Product_Code=907324

http://www.welders-direct.com/merchant2/merchant.mv?Screen=PROD&Store_Code=WD&Product_Code=907321


a decent power metal saw will be a big plus as will a large flat area of concrete, I frequently forget , and assume most guys have access too or know what tools are involved, in most projects and have a few friends willing to get invoved in car related projects.

its amazing how often a car trailer comes in handy, theres of course the transports due to break downs but theres DEALS to be had on NON-running cars ALL the time, I had a buddy recently who found a non-running 1970 caddy for FREE if he would just tow it away!
he borrowed my trailer, the car looked like #$%$%^^& but in about 5 hours it was RUNNING and driveable even if the interior was totally mildewed.

I and several of my friends have purchased a few car trailers that needed some repairs at a very good price, I got mine at a yard sale from a guy that lost his job here,and was moving back up to GA.

It looked like crap but on close inspection it could be repaired reasonably, most of the problems were cosmetic, like bent fenders, broken lights, needing paint, etc.

It was not for sale, at the time but I left my ph# and he called. he at first asked for twice what I eventually paid for it, and even with the repairs it was a decent deal.

so its not impossible to go that route



"As far as loading a non-running vehicle onto a trailer, that's what winches are for! and there will be MANY a TIME that the car your working on or going out to retrieve, won,t run well enough to drive up onto the trailer"
Ive used a chain jack or come along for 40 years and any good hardware store can sell you a 35 foot long section of high strength chain and matching swivel hook that both replaces the original chain on the come along jack and allows you to pull the car up full distance or use a rafters in your garage to pull engines .
remember to secure the car under tension for travel in all directions and thats why you need to SECURELY weld on tie down loops every few feet on the trailer perimeter

when loading a car with limited ground clearance,Your best bet is to unhook the trailer and raise the trailer tongue until the back of the trailer is as close as possible to the ground. and use as long as ramps as possible to reduce the load angle and transition, If you use this method, be sure to put supports under the front and back of the trailer so that the weight of the car doesn't lift the front of the trailer as you load and unload.

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http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=33003

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or if you want to get fancy

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=91905

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IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: your really can use a car transport trailer!

Postby grumpyvette » February 5th, 2010, 10:35 am

found this posted on a different site so be aware in FLORIDA, and some other states

ITS ALL ABOUT REVENUE

"Ok so I bought a new truck this week and while I am at the tag office the girl behind the counter ask me if I tow a trailer and I say ya why?She ask how much does it weigh?Well the state has decided to get more money out of lanscape people and racecar people,she says that the DOT and troopers are to start pulling over anyone towing a trailer and check the total GVW of truck on the registration and check the GVW on the trailer registration, and if your truck is not rated for the trailer weight .You have to unhook it and they call a tow truck to tow it for you and give you a $400.00 fine All this just to increase the falling revinue for the state?So for $35.00 extra I can put on my registration a GVW of 14999 even if the truck is not rated for that in the door????? I just don't get it
I ask how in the heck are they gonna know the weight they got scales or what?She says DOT does but troopers just go by trailer registration.. So watch out!!!!!!"
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: your really can use a car transport trailer!

Postby grumpyvette » September 10th, 2010, 8:30 am

before you go paying big bucks for a new car trailer, take the time to visit craigs list, and your local bargain trader magazines, on occasion you can find lightly used car trailers at outstanding prices, one of my friends, recently got a screaming deal, from a guy that moved from Wisconsin to Florida, and he towed his old non running car down here, the guy had purchased a lightly used almost new trailer for the trip and had no place to store it at his new house so he sold it for the same $800 he paid for it, and was thrilled that in effect he towed his car down here for zero vs the cost of shipping his car that he had been quoted.

most of these trailers below show obvious age,& use, but if you know the price of the new trailers and shop carefully you'll be amazed at the deals you can get occasionally, remember people move, lose jobs, change hobby's etc. so theres a constant source of new trailers on the market, just don,t get into a huge rush to buy one, wait for that good deal, and get a trailer a bit larger than the minimum, because you don,t know what YOUR future projects will be!
pay close attention to the condition of the tires and VERIFY the TITLE and OWNERSHIP, look for rust, indications of abuse or accidents, and be sure the trailers in good condition, you don,t need to buy the first or even any trailer until you find a BARGAIN meeting YOUR NEEDS at a GREAT PRICE! it would be foolish to pay more than 70% of the cost of a new trailer for the identical used trailer so shop new trailer first and take notes, look around then shop both new and used trailers until you get a good grasp on the market

heres a quick selection from todays list, almost every week youll see several new ones listed if your in or near a decent size city
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IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Joined: September 14th, 2008, 1:40 pm
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Re: your really can use a car transport trailer!

Postby grumpyvette » September 10th, 2010, 11:02 am

it should be rather obvious that youll need access to a truck to pull any car trailer, so having a relative, neighbor or a good friend, with a readily used pick-up truck with the correct trailer hitch is a huge plus.
If you've got the cash flow available , personally owning a truck as a second or third vehicle is great, having a truck with the correct load rating and trailer towing options, like a heavy duty cooling system, sway bars, and trailer light hook ups is a big help.
Its been my experience that a 3/4 ton rated 4x4 crew cab pick-up , with an adjustable height trailer hitch is about ideal
as the 4 wheel drive tends to come in very handy on steeper grades and wet or icy roads when towing a trailer, and having seating for 5 and a pick-up bed for cargo is a huge advantage.
remember to place a bit more than 1/2 the load weight forward on the trailer center-line balance point,so about 10% of the load is on the trailer hitch. I.E. 55%-60% weight forward of the balance point,and 40%-45% aft or to the rear of the balance point,this tends to reduce or prevents fish tailing


MORE DARN GOOD INFO IN THESE THREADS


viewtopic.php?f=27&t=25&p=5753&hilit=+trailer#p5753

viewtopic.php?f=27&t=25&p=4224&hilit=trailer+lights#p4224

viewtopic.php?f=27&t=25&p=2694&hilit=+trailer#p2694

http://www.hitchcorner.com/trailer-hitc ... sories.htm
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IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Posts: 14105
Joined: September 14th, 2008, 1:40 pm
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Re: you really can use a car transport trailer!

Postby grumpyvette » October 16th, 2010, 10:44 am

If youve got a car trailer you NEED a set of the correct size bearing buddy grease adapter caps on each bearing, these little gadgets are worth their weight in gold on long trips because the maintain a constant low pressure flow of grease, from the mini-reservoir under the pressurized spring piston into the roller bearings, and you can use a hand grease gun to refill them every few thousand miles, these things truly do , measurable extend wheel bearing life expectancy by easily 300% or more, simply taking the time to pump a bit of grease into the bearing buddy after every 1000-1200 miles adds YEARS to bearing life in my experience.
keep in mind most car trailers sit for weeks at a time then are required to haul tons of equipment at highway speeds for hours at a time, the long down time and high heat loads are bearing killers without the bearing buddys
these adapters simply replace the grease dust caps , after careful measurements are taken, to provide the correct fit, and provide a fast sure way to maintain grease on the roller wheel bearings

trust me, when I assure you if youve ever burned out a trailers wheel bearing hundreds of miles from home you won,t forget to add them to your car trailer or reload them with grease before any trips

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I know this is going to sound silly but I know guys with 30 years experience that still forget to flip the rear grease seal 180 when filling the damn guns ,then they act surprised when the guns leak grease all over the place,when stored, watch the video

http://www.machinerylubrication.com/Vie ... grease-gun
http://www.bearingbuddy.com/
http://www.bearingbuddy.com/installation.html
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HOW BEARING BUDDY® WORKS

The axle hub is filled with grease until the grease forces the Bearing Buddy® piston outward about 1/8 inch. Because the piston is spring loaded, the piston exerts a slight (3 psi) pressure against the grease, which maintains a slight pressure between the inside of the hub and the outside environment. When the hub is submerged, water cannot enter the hub because of this pressure.

An automatic pressure relief feature prevents over-filling and over pressurization. Bearing Buddy diagram Without this feature, the inner seal will be damaged. Grease can be added to the hub through an easily accessible grease fitting located in the center of the piston. Lubricant level (and pressure) can be checked quickly by pressing on the edge of the moveable piston.

If you can rock or move the piston, the hub is properly filled. Bearing Buddy® will last the life of your trailer. The outer barrel is made of steel and is triple chrome plated. Internal Bearing Buddy® parts are made of stainless steel. Bearing Buddy® is also available with a stainless steel barrel for maximum corrosion protection.

http://mibearings.com/ (bearings and hubs)

HOW TO SELECT THE RIGHT MODEL

Pick a genuine Bearing Buddy® to match your hub bore.

To convert a model number to the hub bore in inches (or dust cap diameter), simply place a decimal point after the first digit in the model number.

Model #1980, for example, fits a 1.980” bore hole diameter.

Our 2080T (threaded model 2080) will fit the Reliable oil bath unit that is on many of the EZ Loader trailers.
Model Hub Bore (mm) Outer Bearing Cone Outer Bearing Cup (race)
1980/1980A* 50.41 L-44643, L-44649, L-44640 L44610
1781 45.24 LM-11949 LM-11910
2328 59.25 LM-67048, hub not counterbored LM-67010
1810 45.97 LM-12749 LM-12711
1938 49.34 09067 09194, 95, 96
1968 50.08 M-12649, 07100 M-12610, 07196
1980T N/A All internally threaded hubs
2047 52.08 Various 07204
2080 52.92 900 series 900 series
2240 56.98 1700 series 1729
2441 62.08 LM-67048, hub counterbored, 15123 and others LM-67010, 15245
2562 65.07 48548 48510
2717 69.06 14124, 14125A 14276


A somewhat less accurate, alternative sizing method, uses our Size Gauge Card. The card can be used to select a Bearing Buddy® model based on the size of your dust cap.

*The 1980 and 1980A both fit a hub bore of 1.980 inches, however the 1980A has a blue ring which acts as a visual lubricant level indicator inside the hub.
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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trailer axles and wheel sizes

Postby grumpyvette » October 16th, 2010, 12:07 pm

If your thinking about building a car trailer ID sure like to point out a few factors you may not have thought thru, first is that theres a huge difference in the quality and strength and capacity between trailers so you can,t just say, this guys got a 18-20 ft long double axle car trailer, for lets say $2000, and some other guys got a a 18-20 ft long double axle car trailer, for lets say $3800, so obviously the less expensive trailers a better deal, trailers can be made from steel,aluminum or a combo, they can have brakes on only one or both axles, the tires size and axle load rating DOES MATTER a great deal, theres spring and torsion suspensions, theres strait and drop axle heights, the trailers may or may not need ramps to load the car, the trailer may lower for loading, it may have hydraulics, for loading, etc. theres dozens of factors so shop carefully or if your building a trailer think it thru carefully and add the features you need, and for darn sure learn how to weld correctly and spot bad weld jobs, most new guys think, hey my car weights about 3000-3700lbs, so Ill just buy the 2000-3500 lb axles and I only need brakes on one axle...forgetting that the trailer itself may weight almost as much as the car itself or that the trailer brakes should help slow the tow truck, not add to the load on its brakes, one trip thru the mountains should cure you of that stupid thought process. add the features from the design phase, don,t try to do mods later as it only costs more and takes more time and effort.
now your first time trailer buyer is usually 99% interested in the lowest price, but what are you buying?
can you drive the car up on the trailer and open the car doors to exit or do you need to crawl out a window?
can you disconnect and reconnect the tow truck easily?, are the brakes and lights on a singly easy plug?
how hard is it to load a car if the cars engine won,t start?
can the trailer be pulled over a field rather than only pavement?
(ground clearance and tire size matter)
a trailer that burns out wheel bearing or that flexes constantly, pulls,dives on hard stops, bounces, or has no or not adequate brakes, etc, can cause you to flip your towed car and tow truck! what are you risking, ........two cars and several lives???


as a general rule ID suggest,
a 18-20 ft length, with dropped axles,
DUAL AXLES rated at 5200lbs,
WITH BRAKES ON BOTH AXLES,
have more than minimal brake lights
verify brake lights and brake function before trips
remember to keep license plate valid , and registration handy
getting the trailer axles designed for a COMMONLY AVAILABLE WHEEL AND BEARING SIZE
and learning how to load a trailer correctly before making any trips



trailers

http://www.tjtrailers.com/store/car-car ... 18x80.html

http://www.stockcarracing.com/howto/scr ... index.html

http://knol.google.com/k/how-to-build-a-car-trailer#

http://www.circletrack.com/howto/78218_ ... index.html

http://www.circletrack.com/howto/78358_ ... index.html

AXLES
http://abctrailerparts.com/

http://abctrailerparts.com/trailer-axles.html

http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/ ... +axle-kits

http://www.axleinc.com/id6.html

http://www.axleinc.com/id9.html

http://www.easternmarine.com/em_store/a ... 2godL0jAMQ
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Posts: 14105
Joined: September 14th, 2008, 1:40 pm
Location: florida

Re: you really can use a car transport trailer!

Postby grumpyvette » December 21st, 2010, 5:04 pm

many guys have various car ramps , like the kwik lift, but Ive found that a car transport trailer can be modified to provide almost the same function as a car ramp or QUIK LIFT , giving you easy under the car access, if you have some skill with a welder,and ACCESS TO A WELDER, and some basic fabrication skills thus greatly enhancing the usefulness of a car transport trailer.
http://www.kwik-lift.com/index.html
viewtopic.php?f=27&t=26&hilit=ramps+corvette
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viewtopic.php?f=103&t=10288&p=41677&hilit=winch#p41677
adding a couple swinging support jacks to the forward corners of an open center car transport trailer ,if its properly designed , too allow its use as a car maintenance access ramp, for jobs like clutch jobs and oil changes, makes a car trailer very handy
but I know several guys who have built custom car trailers with DUAL FUNCTION that have a removable center FLOORING section, that allows the car trans port trailer to be used in a very similar manor to a KWIK LIFT for repair work yet also be used to transport the car, this dual purpose , custom design feature makes the trailer far more useful
having a winch on the trailer to draw non-running cars on to the trailer or up on the trailer if your using it as repair access ramps for under car access helps, and while neither of these trailers below are set up to act like quik lift ramps you can see the potential if you think about it and have welding skills
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http://www.harborfreight.com/2000-lb-ca ... 69782.html
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IF youve got a decent welder you can fabricate ramps from 2" angle iron and 2" box steel, long , sturdy gradual ramps and jacking the front of the trailer up as far as practical when loading a car tends to help get the car over the transition from ramp to trailer without damage to headers or suspension components.
just keep in mind the low under car clearance ,on cars like corvettes, in many cases the front of the car transport trailer will need to be jacked up and a couple sheets of 24" wide and 8 ft long 3/4" plywood will need to be placed on the load ramps to allow a corvette to roll up on the trailer easily, if the cars got exceptionally low ground clearance, when loading a car with limited ground clearance,Your best bet is to unhook the trailer and raise the trailer tongue until the back of the trailer is as close as possible to the ground. and use as long as ramps as possible to reduce the load angle and transition, If you use this method, be sure to put supports under the front and back of the trailer so that the weight of the car doesn't lift the front of the trailer as you load and unload.
Ive always preferred ramps that are welded to a hinge on the rear of the trailer, that fold vertical for transport, that have lower support braces, and that are locked up in place, during transport as that provides some bit of extra security from the car rolling off in transport,( LOOK AT THE TWO TRAILER PICTURES BELOW)but welding 3 (D) rings on the cars frame in conspicuousness locations on each side to act as solid tie down lock points , and 3-to-6 similar D rings on the trailer frame is also a very good idea
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getting the car up on the trailer can be a challenge at times , especially if its not running or the brakes don,t work ,so think it thru and do it safely, BTW its almost ALWAYS a mistake to try an load a car with FLAT TIRES, or ramps that are too short to provide the correct angle and clearance, on a trailer as this reduces the under car clearance to the point its almost guaranteed to cause under the car damage, during the load process, so even if the car does not run have a drive train, or a running engine ,you'll need to have at least 4 tires that are fully inflated as you load the car or your asking for problems, its STUPID to cause damage that will need to be repaired at your expense if a bit of care taken during the loading process will avoid it. its even dumber to fail to securely tie down the car, during transport, a sudden need to brake or turn can cause you thousands of dollars in damage or a law suit if the car comes off during transport, or rolls off the trailer into your car or someone elses in traffic
if its your trailer have a dozen strong cargo loops welded into the trailer frame
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http://www.uscargocontrol.com/Ratchet-S ... nting-Ring
Ive used a chain jack for 40 years and any good hardware store can sell you a 35 foot long section of high strength chain and matching swivel hook that both replaces the original chain on the come along jack and allows you to pull the car up full distance or use a rafters in your garage to pull engines

remember you NEED a few SOLIDLY WELDED D-RINGS as chain jack anchor points and decent ramps for loading the trailer help a great deal

obviously having the correct accessories and trailed design helps


if its your trailer have a dozen strong cargo loops (D RINGS) welded into the trailer frame and at least 4 more on the car frame of your race car.
have at least 4 tie down ratchets,and /or a few sections of 3/8" chain with hooks

http://www.harborfreight.com/9200-lb-ra ... -5511.html

http://www.harborfreight.com/3-8-eighth ... 40462.html
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http://www.uscargocontrol.com/Ratchet-S ... nting-Ring

btw U-haul and similar rental company's will usually rent a car transport trailer for under $70 a day, and in some cases thats a bargain vs having your car towed if you have a truck or a friend with a truck to pull it equipped with a solid hitch, and they usually take a standard 2" ball, hitch, and trailer light connector
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: you really can use a car transport trailer!

Postby grumpyvette » January 3rd, 2011, 12:42 pm

http://www.ehow.com/about_7231387_diffe ... tires.html

With all the selection and technology available on today's tire market, you might wonder why a specialized trailer tire should even be necessary. The fact that trailers (which simply get towed around as dead weight) even need a specialized tire seems counterintuitive; a 5,000 pound trailer shouldn't need any more support than a 5,000 pound car, especially considering the fact that it doesn't have to turn or accelerate. However, trailer tires are constructed the way they are for a very specific reason.

Basic Differences
1. Cars and trailers have two very different requirements. Car tires are engineered to provide traction in the forward-and-back (longitudinal) and side-to-side (lateral) directions whiles providing a comfortable ride. Trailer tires are engineered to support the weight of the trailer for many thousands of miles while not bouncing the trailer off the road, and that's about it.
Stiffness
2. One of the major ways in which trailer tires differ from car tires is that they have very stiff sidewalls. Those very thick sidewalls are designed to help support the trailer weight without flexing, but that lack of flexibility carries with it some inherent drawbacks. Car tires' sidewalls flex to allow more of the tire's tread to stay in contact with the road; a boon to performance but a liability where durability is concerned.
Rolling Resistance
3. Trailer tires are more durable than car tires for two reasons. The first is the aforementioned sidewall thickness, the second is the trailer tire's rubber compound. All rolling objects have a certain amount of "rolling resistance," which is the tire's tendency to stick to the road. While stickiness is good for performance and traction, it reduces fuel mileage and increases tire temperature while moving. Trailer tires have very hard rubber compounds, which helps to reduce rolling resistance but absolutely kills traction. One extreme example of low rolling resistance wheels are solid metal train wheels, which are very efficient at allowing the train to move but do little to grip the track.
Construction Types
4. Almost all car tires are "radially" designed, meaning that their interior belts are set at 90-degree angles to each other so that some are always pointed in the direction of travel. While you can buy radial trailer tires, many are the less sophisticated bias-ply type, which use belts set at 45-degree angles. Bias-ply tires are a bit more rugged and damage resistant than radials, but radials offer a better ride, better fuel economy, longer life, better traction and better trailer tracking.
Mixing Trailer and Car Tires
5. You can use light truck tires on a fairly lightweight trailer, but you'll want to subtract at least 10 percent of the tire's rated load capacity to account for sidewall flex. Passenger car tires flex even more, so you may need to subtract as much as 40 percent load capacity for safe running. You should never, ever, ever use trailer tires on a car. You might get a little better fuel mileage, but that will come to a quick end when you go flying off the road or get T-boned while sliding through an intersection.



Read more: Difference Between Trailer & Car Tires | eHow.com http://www.ehow.com/about_7231387_diffe ... z19zolinMW
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Re: you really can use a car transport trailer!

Postby grumpyvette » February 18th, 2011, 6:29 am

http://www.sporttruck.com/techarticles/ ... index.html
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Bolt-on hitches are available...

Bolt-on hitches are available for most trucks. This Draw-Tite kit can be installed on a 1999 Chevy Silverado with ordinary handtools. It&8217s rated to have a maximum towing capacity of 5,000 pounds (Class III). A hitch with a removable drawbar is often called a receiver hitch. With the drawbar removed, this type of hitch is compact and can be readily concealed behind a custom panel or a roll pan.

The Draw-Tite hitch is bolted...


The Draw-Tite hitch is bolted to the bottom flange of the Silverado frame with eight 9/16-inch bolts. Large steel backing plates distribute towing loads along the frame flange and prevent the carriage bolts from spinning during installation.

The Silverado installation...


The Silverado installation is straightforward, but an extra pair of hands makes the job much easier. If you&8217re on your own, a floor jack can be used to position the hitch against the underside of the frame.


The hitch is bolted through existing holes in the Silverado frame. Bolts shouldn&8217t be overtightened, and they should be checked occasionally to ensure that they maintain the recommended torque.
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Coupling a trailer can be...


Coupling a trailer can be difficult if you don&8217t have a spotter to help align the drawbar and ball with the trailer coupler. The SpeedHitch articulating drawbar makes this job a snap. This drawbar swivels and extends to mate with the coupler. The rig is then pulled forward until the drawbar swings into alignment. Backing toward the trailer locks the drawbar in place.
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Security is important when...


Security is important when you have a valuable trailer. In this department, more is always better, and there&8217s no such thing as too much. If you have a receiver hitch, a receiver pin lock will protect your drawbar (and trailer) from wily opportunists.

Although styling and performance will always be fundamental parts of a sport truck, the greatest appeal for many enthusiasts is the basic practicality of a truck. The vast majority of custom trucks are driven daily, and many are regularly expected to perform some kind of towing duty. With this kind of "real truck," it's important for you to understand basic towing principles and limitations.

It's one thing to cruise around in a cool-looking truck, but things can get complicated when you hook a load to the back of your pride and joy. First of all, the most fundamental considerations are the towing and trailering regulations required by your state vehicle code. The best place to check out state regs is the state highway patrol. If you stop by one of the stations, you might be given a booklet that details the rules and limitations relating to trailer or vehicle towing.

During this process you'll become aware of the many terms and expressions that are unique to working trucks and towing. Terms like gross vehicle weight, cargo weight, and gross axle weight can be confusing, and at times they may even seem to be conflicting. The most important thing is to be certain that you understand the ratings that apply to your specific truck and trailer combination. For instance, it's easy to confuse hitch ratings with vehicle tow ratings. It's not uncommon for a truck to be fit with a hitch that's rated well beyond the actual towing capacity of the truck. Of course, it's important that the hitch rating be sufficient for the load, but the safe towing limit is determined by the vehicle tow rating, not the hitch rating.

Important limitations: Gross axle weight ratings, gross vehicle rating, and so forth are usually listed in the owner's manual. In most cases, they're also posted on a tag that's attached to the latch-edge of the driver-side door or inside the door frame (usually on the latch pillar). Most midsize and fullsize trucks can pull loads up to approximately 2,000 pounds with relative safety. This weight point is a generalization, however, and it's important to realize that as the weight of the trailer load increases, two factors--gross trailer weight (GTW) and tongue weight--become increasingly crucial to safe vehicle handling.

Gross trailer weight is directly related to the towing capacity of the tow vehicle. The vehicle must be able to adequately accelerate, merge with traffic, climb typical road grades, handle reasonably well, and stop safely while pulling the weight of the trailer. Manufacturers determine the safe towing capacity through testing. If the towing capacity isn't published in the manufacturer's specifications, you can subtract the gross vehicle weight (as measured on a scale) from the gross combination weight rating, and the result will be the towing capacity.

Most trucks will pull loads beyond the manufacturer's tow rating, and if the engine has been modified to increase torque output, a truck may be able to move loads that are substantially beyond the safe capabilities of the suspension and brake components. The only way to ensure safety, especially if you're going to be towing a relatively heavy trailer rig, is to verify the weight of the trailer and compare it to the towing capacity of the truck.

Trailer manufacturers also provide weight specifications for their products. The most important ratings are the gross trailer rating and the useful load. In the case of a hauling trailer, the gross rating equals the empty weight of the trailer plus the useful load. For example, the empty weight of a trailer may be 1,500 pounds and it may be rated to a gross weight of 5,000 pounds. This means the useful load capacity is 3,500 pounds. When this trailer is loaded to the full useful load limit of 3,500 pounds, a truck with a towing capacity of 5,000 pounds or greater will be required to pull it safely.

Trailer loading is, however, a tricky business. It's surprisingly easy to load a trailer beyond its gross rating. Just like most trucks, the typical trailer will usually carry a load that's beyond the rated capacity. In certain circumstances this overloading can exceed both the trailer capacity and the truck towing capacity. It's easy to overlook load ratings or ignore actual loaded weights, but it's unwise. If you estimate that a load is near either the trailer or truck capacity, it would be wise to locate a vehicle scale to verify the actual weight (free standing). If you can't determine the actual weight, the safest approach is to lighten the load until you're certain the actual weight is less than the gross weight rating of the trailer and towing capacity of your truck.

In the case of a recreational trailer or a boat and trailer combination, the actual weight of the total rig can be deceiving. Even though the manufacturer provides a factory weight specification, this weight may not include options or modifications. And you must consider that the average recreational trailer acquires a lot of miscellaneous personal gear before it hits the highway. Similarly, the actual weight of a boat and trailer rig must include add-ons, miscellaneous gear, and the weight of onboard fuel.

The second weight factor to consider is trailer tongue weight. The weight of the loaded trailer is distributed between the axle (or axles) and the tongue. Most of the weight is carried by the axle, but as the cargo (or a portion of the cargo) is moved forward on the trailer, weight (downward force) is shifted from the axle to the tongue. In the same way, it's possible to shift the cargo rearward and reduce the weight on the tongue. For the tow vehicle to exert adequate control over the trailer, however, there must be some weight on the tongue. The recommended tongue weight for most trailers is about 10 to 15 percent of the gross trailer weight.

When a trailer is attached to a truck, the tongue weight is transferred across to the hitch and the rear of the vehicle. This additional loading behind the rear axle has two primary effects: First, It increases the downward force on the rear suspension and rear axle; Second, The additional weight behind the rear axle pivots across the rear axle, sort of like a teetertotter, reducing the weight bearing on the front suspension and axle (spindles). If the gross trailer weight and the tongue weight are kept within the rated limits, the truck will handle these effects. In extreme cases, however, overloading the rear of a truck may significantly reduce the steering response. These effects can be counteracted, within limits, by modern hitch technology.

When the gross trailer weight exceeds 1,000 pounds, most truck manufacturers recommend that the trailer be fit with its own brake system. Many states require auxiliary brakes when the gross trailer weight exceeds 3,000 pounds. Trailer manufacturers generally offer these systems as standard equipment or options.

There are two basic type of trailer brake systems: electric or hydraulic. Electric systems are activated by an electronic controller that monitors the brake system of the tow vehicle. Hydraulic systems can divided into three subcategories: surge, slave, or vacuum systems.

Surge-actuated systems are activated by a separate master cylinder at the trailer tongue. When the tow vehicle slows down, rearward pressure is passed through the trailer tongue to the auxiliary master cylinder on the trailer, which in turn, applies the trailer brakes.

Slave hydraulic systems are connected directly to the brake system of the tow vehicle and work in conjunction with the main system.

Vacuum systems are controlled by an auxiliary vacuum module connected to the vacuum booster of the tow vehicle. These systems are the most expensive and are most often used on very large towing rigs.

Electric and surge systems are the most common, and they're always a worthwhile if not mandatory investment. Slave hydraulic systems should be considered with caution. Most truck manufacturers don't recommend these systems. If there's insufficient capacity in the master cylinder or if any component in the system should fail, the brakes on both the trailer and tow vehicle could be compromised.

Trailer hitches are divided into two general categories: weight-carrying hitches or weight-distributing hitches. Weight-carrying hitches are commonly used with lighter trailers (3,500 pounds GTW or less). With this type of hitch, the entire tongue weight is directly supported by the hitch. As described above, the tongue weight is carried like virtually any other load placed in the bed of the truck.

For heavier trailers, a better choice is a weight-distributing hitch. This technology uses a pair of spring bars slung between the hitch and the trailer frame to form a flexing truss across the interface. In effect, the frame of the trailer and the frame of the truck are bound directly to each other, but the spring bars bend in the vertical plane, allowing the two frames to articulate separately. This flexible truss distributes the tongue weight along the length of the two frames. For example, if the tongue weight of a trailer is 600 pounds, when the trailer is hooked to a truck with a weight-distributing hitch, 200 pounds (approximately) of the weight will transfer to the front wheels of the truck, 200 pounds will transfer to the rear wheels of the truck, and 200 pounds will transfer back to the wheels of the trailer.

Hitches are also subclassified according to the gross trailer weight they can support. The class limitations established by the Society of Automotive Engineers are listed in the accompanying chart. In general, Class I hitches are suitable for light-hauling trailers, lightweight recreational, or fishing boat rigs and motorcycle/watercraft trailers. Class II hitches are suitable for medium-hauling trailers, small recreational trailers, and ski boat or light day cruiser rigs. Class III and IV hitches are for heavy-duty loads (see chart above).

The most important thing to remember here is that the maximum towing capacity of the vehicle is always determined by the lowest-rated element in the chain of hitch components. This chain consists of the trailer rating, the ball hitch rating, the hitch rating, and the towing capacity of the vehicle. The weakest, or lowest-rated, element in this chain always determines the maximum safe towing capability of the entire chain.

Quality aftermarket hitches are available from Putnam, Draw-Tite, Eaz-Lift, Reese, and others. These sources specialize in hitches that can be bolted directly to the rear framework of most popular trucks. As you'd expect, these designs must work around obstructions like the fuel tank, spare tire, and bumper mounts. In addition, most of these designs rely on stock holes punched or drilled in the frame by the vehicle manufacturer as convenient points to attach the hitch.

Some companies offer hitches that are welded directly to the rear framework of the truck. These designs must also work around factory obstructions. They aren't, however, dependent upon factory-located holes to attach to the framework. Often, this allows for fewer design compromises. On the other hand, expert welding--often within very tight spaces--is essential to ensure a top-quality installation. This isn't a do-it-yourself proposition, but it may be the best option when a heavy-duty hitch (Class IV) is required or when the rear frame or bodywork has been extensively modified.

Specialty companies, like HitchMasters in Van Nuys, California, can supply weld-on hitches for nearly any truck or custom requirement. Although these hitches are a little more expensive, they can provide the finest quality, and, within reason, they can be built to accommodate nearly any stock, specialty, or custom bumper or custom panel arrangement.

Ball Mount And Hitch Ball

Some weight-carrying hitches are available with removable draw bars. The drawbar is the hitch element that supports the ball. On a removable design, the drawbar is attached to a quick-connect mount built into the hitch. The drawbar mount is called a receiver, and these designs are generally known as receiver hitches. Removable draw bars are popular, obviously, because the hitch (with the drawbar removed) can be readily concealed behind a custom panel or rear roll pan. They also provide some small technical advantages. When the trailer is hooked to the hitch, the frame of the trailer should be roughly level. If the truck has been lowered, a standard hitch may lower the front of the trailer. An offset drawbar can raise the ball location, to bring the trailer back to a level stance. In addition, a removable drawbar design permits separate draw bars, with different size hitch balls, to be attached quickly and easily to the hitch.

The hitch ball diameter must match the inside diameter of the trailer coupler. Balls are available in three standard diameters. A 1-7/8-inch coupler and ball combination is common on small utility and boat trailers. The 2-inch-diameter ball is by far the most common and is generally used with couplers on trailers rated between 2,000 and 5,000 pounds GTW. A 2-5/16-inch ball is usually required for heavier trailers. A specific maximum weight rating is generally stamped into the top of the ball. For safe towing, this rating must meet or exceed the actual gross trailer weight.

In theory, modifications to the engine and brakes will alter the towing capacity of the vehicle. In practice, however, it's virtually impossible to measure the effect of these changes. Consequently, any modification should be viewed in an optimistically neutral manner. In other words, even though an engine or brake modification may potentially increase towing performance, the basic towing rating established by the manufacturer must still be observed.

Suspension modifications are another story altogether. Certain suspension mods can hinder the towing capabilities of a truck. The most common sport truck modification, lowering the suspension, reduces the static clearance between the rear framerails and axlehousing. Under light loading this may not be a problem, but if the trailer load is heavy enough to cause the frame to contact the axlehousing, the resulting damage can be severe. Adjustable airbags or air shocks may effectively raise the rear of the truck, increasing support for the trailer load, but a better solution is a weight-distributing hitch that would apportion some of the tongue weight to the other axles.

If the rear framerails have been cut to gain clearance above the axles, the towing capacity of the truck must be severely curtailed. Airbags or air shocks are commonly used with this type of modification, but they are not an adequate countermeasure for heavy loads added to the rear of the truck. They will stiffen the support at the rear axle, but excessive weight at the rear of the truck may simply bend or break the framerails, much like you can bend (break!) a stick by supporting it in the middle with your knee and pushing down on both ends.

A load-distributing hitch won't solve this problem. Redistributing the tongue load to the front truck axle and the trailer axle won't reduce the stress along the framerails. In such cases it's not uncommon for the framerails to bend or break at the cutout section. Needless to say, this is not easy to repair.

The bottom line here is pretty straightforward. As long as you firmly understand and respect the limitations of your truck, towing a trailer is pretty simple. If you have radically modified the suspension, reduce these limitations by a generous amount (at least 50 percent). And remember, the meaning of sport trucking is to have fun.
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
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Re: you really can use a car transport trailer!

Postby grumpyvette » August 10th, 2011, 10:34 am

BTW Id point out the need for at least two solidly anchored and welded to the trailer,minimum 3/8" link safety chains
because most 1/4" and 5/16" link safety chain pops like rotten string under the sudden shock loads a trailer at speed can easily apply to those safety chains, and the chains should be short enough to prevent the trailer ball hitch from contacting the road and digging in to help prevent the chains from snapping loose.

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and decent anchor links,with screw type locks, because its not all that rare for a trailer ball to pop off a trailer hitch on rough roads, or if the car swerves , and you don,t want to be sued or be responsible for someone death, if your trailer launches into on coming traffic

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chains hanging down this way with this type of hook are an invitation to disaster

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chains with forged hooks are better but still far from idea, if the chains too long simply twist it till its shorter before you hook it up, chains should be crossed under the trailer tongue to catch and support the trailer hitch if it pops loose, preventing it from falling and digging into the pavementl

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good safety chains on a trailer can save your life, or prevent you from killing some one else


http://www2.wsav.com/news/2010/jul/11/1 ... ar-566624/

http://www.trucktestdigest.com/TTDfeatu ... egally.htm
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
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Re: you really can use a car transport trailer!

Postby grumpyvette » November 7th, 2011, 11:12 am

If your around racers and car hobby guys youll eventually hear about guys getting trailers stolen or maybe be ripped off, now obviously you can,t absolutely prevent every potential threat but you can make things FAR MORE DIFFICULT FOR THIEVES
a GOOD WELDER will allow you to fabricate something secure to keep the wheels from turning or being removed and obviously locking the trailer with a heavy hardened chain, & pad lock and wheel and trailer tongue locks inside a locked fence worn,t hurt, look your trailer over as if you were the thieve and try to make its removal vastly more difficult
given time any thieve can over come most locks so motion detector lights and motion detector alarms and video cameras and a few dogs in a locked fence sure won,t hurt.
simply making the trailer far more difficult to move and unlock helps, but an alarm that detects movement, and making it very difficult to work on the trailer while undetected is also a big help, if you walk up to a trailer and see its lock into a heavy ring in a concrete deck, the trailer tongue has a lock, the wheels are locked and two dual 200 watt flood lights come on as you approach it and theres obviously video surveillance it makes the trailer far less appealing to thieves


viewtopic.php?f=27&t=7810&p=26824#p26824

http://www.sturdybuiltonline.com/Trimax ... p_792.html

http://www.sturdybuiltonline.com/Trimax ... p_790.html

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IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
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Re: you really can use a car transport trailer!

Postby northrnyankee » November 7th, 2011, 12:28 pm

recently there was a total of 5 GNs/T-Types stolen, and 3 trucks and trailers stolen from the GS Nationals..
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Re: you really can use a car transport trailer!

Postby phantomjock » May 14th, 2012, 8:30 pm

Grumpy -
An oldie - but Goodie Thread! And, I'm convinced I'll need a trailer. I've read through the other threads too, but have a question or two - if you don't mind.

I'm kind of space limited - so the 18 foot with dovetail etc, etc - won't fit into my garage. And even though I'm on the Red Neck Riviera - the neighbors would run me off If I kept it the front yard - so its gotta fit in the garage. So max length is closer to 19 feet OVERALL! Not deck plus, tongue, hitch, dovetails etc. MAX Overall!

And I'll be towing the C3 corvette.
So here are the questions:
1. Is this combination possible? Carry a C3--and store in the garage? What do you think?
2. How about starting with a set of plans from a 16 footer trailer - then cut those down?
3. Anything particular to pay attention to? Like placement of the Axles?
4. What about cutting down a U-Haul Car Hauler? They're pretty stout and go forever, infrequently available, but would that be a do-able project? Axle location would be fixed - but could "Bob" the tail maybe?
5. A Roll-Back would be nice and I thought I saw they might be available in a custom 14 foot length. More research needed here.
6. I've seen rigs that let you hinge the tongue - but that didn't look like it would adapt to something like the U-Haul.

Thanks for the links and insights!

Cheers - Jim

Yeah, I know I need a bigger Garage! That ain't happening anytime soon. :lol:
Returned - Baghdad, Iraq
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Re: you really can use a car transport trailer!

Postby grumpyvette » May 14th, 2012, 9:47 pm

your hardly the first guy to find that the car trailer needs to be able to be a bit shorter to fit into a garage and yes there is several ways thats done.
obviously having some fabrication skill a decent MIG WELDER and a bit of custom creativity helps,

IVe seen guys build custom tilt trailers where the whole front tongue either telescoped in under the trailer when parked, and locked into place out in the extended position when in use with several large bolts or pins or some where the trailer folded almost in half when not in use, theres also completely detachable, or just folding trailer tongues, a bit of creative fabrication can easily get you a trailer with a max stored length under 19 ft long

BTW your going to find that youll need to park the car trailer and most guys don,t want it taking up valuable pavement space in the drive way, but you don,t want the trailer sitting on dirt or grass as its a P.I.T.A. to keep the tires and bearings out of the moisture, so you can cover the wheels with a tarp to reduce sun light damage on the tires and I purchased (5) 24" sq concrete pavers and have the trailer parked so each trailer wheels on one and the tongue jacks on the 5th one
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a completely detachable tongue section and swing away support jacks on each corner would make that fairly easy
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it would not be very difficult to buy a trailer similar to this one and modify it so the entire tongue was a quick detachable design, and having 4 swing down jacks one on each corner to allow safely storing a car up on the trailer in a garage, if your garage door height allowed it, to be backed into the garage with the car on the trailer,in fact a bit of custom fabrication would allow the trailer to double as a low level lift to allow you to work on the car as if it were a typical 4 post lift , with access using a mechanics creeper .



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQm-JS1F0oE

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EULbcSVJ ... re=related

http://www.championtrailers.com/UTILITY ... R_KITS.HTM

http://www.tjtrailers.com/store/18-HYDRAULIC-TILT.HTML

http://www.youtube.com/watch?feature=en ... 4pjkPP2v48

viewtopic.php?f=103&t=10288

http://www.etrailer.com/Trailer-Coupler ... 40300.html
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IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
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Re: you really can use a car transport trailer!

Postby grumpyvette » August 12th, 2012, 4:44 pm

WHY WON,T THE TRAILER TOW DEAD SOLIDLY STABLE IN LINE BEHIND THE CAR?

its a fact that many guys don,t maintain the trailer bearings tires or brake lights very well, and its hardly rare to see brake lights on a trailer that don,t work,or a trailer loaded incorrectly so a great deal of weight on the tongue transfers to the read bumper of the tow vehicle making the tow trucks front brakes and steering far less effective.
load the trailer with too much weight to the rear and it tends to snake around, too much to the front it tends to dip and buck on roads and during braking, get the tire pressures un-even and it tends to pull to one side,
keep in mind a car transport trailer weights a good deal more than most people think and once you add a car to the trailer weight you could easily be looking at 4500lbs-6000lbs which is far heavier than the average 1/2 ton pick-up truck can safely handle, if your towing a car on a trailer its sometimes a far better idea to rent a truck and trailer than do something really dumb like sticking a 6000lb trailer behind something like a 1/2 ton rated pick-up truck designed to tow only 1550 lbs which I see occasionally, a one ton dually is usually required to safely tow a car on a trailer or a truck set up correctly for tow work. Id also point out that youll need to remember adding an extra 4500lbs-6000lbs easily triples your trucks braking distance , A car and trailer combo should not weigh more than about 60% -70%of what the tow truck weights and speeds in excess of 60 mph are rarely a good idea. if your tow trucks rear bumper droops under the loaded trailers weight more than a couple inches or the trailer doesn,t sit fairly level once loaded your looking to have trailer tow stability issues.
Id strongly suggest greasing wheel bearings and checking tires and D-rings well, and make 100% sure you have several good 3/8" chains to lock down the load to the d-rings and prevent the load center shifting , making it securely locked into place.
before any trips you should be inspecting the lights, brakes and all related components before scheduling an out of area car transport,verify the license and inspection stickers are current, and valid as you neither want to brake down or get tickets then add to that many guys have zero idea how to balance and center a load so the trailer tongue has only a few percentage points bias ,slightly more weight forward than the center of balance to help keep the trailer ball firmly locked to the trailer or how to connect safety chains or brake lights, etc. and your looking at a good deal of potential accidents traveling on the high way.
READ THRU THE LINKS

http://www.sherline.com/lmbook.htm

http://www.edmunds.com/how-to/how-to-tow-a-trailer.html

http://howtotow.com/car/

http://www.ehow.com/how_4829800_tow-car-trailer.html
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
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Re: you really can use a car transport trailer!

Postby grumpyvette » August 13th, 2012, 9:29 am

Ive always regretted selling that lemans/GTO clone and would love to have it back but finances and current prices make that a remote chance at best, post pictures of that trailer , seems like a deal.
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
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