how to wire a shop.



Re: how to wire a shop.

Postby grumpyvette » July 13th, 2011, 8:37 am

Indycars wrote:Could solid wire be run to just above the switch/receptacle and then switch to stranded wire for the last
few feet ??? In my situation, seems it would be hard to push stranded wire thru PVC conduit, so I would need to use
solid wire in the beginning of the run.


you almost never PUSH WIRE in conduit, we normally put a bit if plastic wrap , crumpled up like a loose fitting conduit size clump and tie some string to it, push it about 6" into the conduit and then use a compressor and nozzle Image to blow the strong string tied to the line (usually parachute cord,) thru the conduit then tie the string to the wire, tape the ends in a tapered tip, and pull it thru the conduit after coating the wire with a lube like dish soap liquid or WD 40 every few feet as its pulled thru the conduit, it helps a great deal to have one guy feeding and lubing the wire as it enters the conduit and a second guy pulling steadily
it also helps to have no more than 270 degrees of turns in conduit between access boxes and use long sweeps in turns


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IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
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Re: how to wire a shop.

Postby Indycars » July 13th, 2011, 10:17 am

To make life easier for me to pull new circuits in the future, I ran PVC conduit from my breaker box to the middle
of my attic. It stops about 3 feet from the attic access door. It was easy for me to push what I have so far, but while
I was there I included a pull string for the future. For me it's been easier to just push the cable, who knows when the
conduit get more circuits in them.

The biggest reason for using solid wire in my case would be the cost. But if can use stranded wire when I get close to
the box, then that would be more economical. That's why I was wondering if you could use both types of cables and
how would you join them in accordance with NEC code.

Here is what my situation looks like.

DSC00009a.jpg
Conduit90Elbo02a.jpg
DSC00015a.jpg
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Re: how to wire a shop.

Postby grumpyvette » October 14th, 2012, 6:22 pm

this wiring stuffs not hard to do, but use the correct gauge wire and the correct plugs and sockets for the application and ID strongly suggest using a MINIMUM of 10ga wire for 110 volt wiring and 3/4" metallic conduit (use the correct single breaker rating for the application on the 110 volt)
110 v outlet end
black/power to the gold screw
white/neutral to the silver screw
green/ground to the green screw

110v at the box
black/power to breaker
white/ neutral to neutral bar
green/ ground to ground bar

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In some cases youll want the option of wiring in a light switch that allows you to enter or leave by two different entrance doors yet turn on or off the lights with a switch at either entrance.

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GFI outlets are the PREFERRED style in any shop where the concrete or tile floor might get wet forming a good ground when using power tools or portable lighting or extension cords, etc. for safety reasons
GFI Features and Benefits
Automatically test the GFCI-receptacle every time the RESET button is pushed in. The GFCI-receptacle will not reset if the GFCI circuit is not functioning properly.
By blocking reset of the GFCI if protection has been compromised, Smart Lock PRO reduces the possibility of end-users incorrectly assuming that a reset GFCI outlet is providing ground fault protection when it actually is not.
A line-load reversal diagnostic feature is provided which prevents the GFCI-receptacle from being reset and stops power from being fed to the GFCI-receptacle face or through to downstream devices. A green LED indicator on the GFCI's face also illuminates to alert the installer to the line-load wiring reversal.
The trip latch mechanism in Smart Lock Pro GFCIs is a one piece "T" design for efficient operation.
There are 4 sets of contacts for load terminals and face. Smart Lock PRO GFCI-receptacles use a patented bifurcated bridge contact for efficient operation.
Trip threshold meets or exceeds UL requirements for tripping time.
Improved immunity to high-frequency noise reduces nuisance tripping.
Advanced electronics design provides superior resistance to electrical surges and over-voltages.
Expanded wiring options with nine back-wire holes (two for each line and load connection plus one for ground with an internal clamp).


EVERY OUTLET SHOULD BE GROUNDED TO THE METAL CONDUIT PLUS THE GREEN GROUND WIRE, so in most cases having these mini ground straps you can purchase cheaply helps speed up the wiring process

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http://www.homedepot.com/s/wire+stripper?NCNI-5
http://www.homedepot.com/p/Ideal-Stripm ... 819657-_-N
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having the correct tool to thread metallic outlet boxes for easy use of those ground screws helps
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
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Re: how to wire a shop.

Postby grumpyvette » November 20th, 2012, 10:37 am

now I recently looked back over my receipts and I found I purchased and installed

http://www.powerstream.com/Wire_Size.htm
in my 36 ft deep, x 75ft wide,x 16 ft tall shop
12 500 foot rolls of 10 ga stranded wire,
1200 ft of 3/4" conduit,
1100 ft of 00 gauge feed
4 10ft copper ground rods,
24 dual 120 volt outlets.
mounted every 10 feet along the walls
6- 230 volt outlets, for
(two air compressors, a mill, the welders, and the car lift)
21 quad florescent 4ft ceiling fixtures,
plus
18 60" industrial ceiling fans
two 2400cfm roof exhaust fans,
8 dual lamp motion sensor lights,
and a rather extensive alarm system,
plus a phone system.
a 200 amp service box with 24 breakers
I installed it myself (with the help of friends and my two grown sons ) over about a months time,
to better than building code required specs, and saved at least
70% of what the local electricians quoted but still had about $6K in electrical related materials
when I wired my shop a 500 ft roll of 10 ga stranded copper wire cost $67 each, I just priced them yesterday at $110 each per roll, no doubt the other components went up a similar amount, over the last few years time also.
but Id been quoted $15-$20K when I showed electricians what I wanted, with it all in conduit, all home run and all at least 10 ga copper stranded wire, and what I got quoted on was not nearly all that was installed because as I got into the project I kept adding additional lighting and outlets as I saw a need
the electrical inspectors were very impressed once it was done!
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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