storing a spare engine



storing a spare engine

Postby grumpyvette » October 29th, 2008, 6:02 pm

http://www.airpartskc.com/catalog-pdf/Page19.htm

http://store.yahoo.com/rodi/chmm012.html

viewtopic.php?f=51&t=7697&p=26187#p26187

THERE ARE LARGE HEAVY WALL PLASTIC BOXES DESIGNED FOR ENGINE STORAGE AND TRANSPORT
http://www.scribnerplastics.com/engcase.htm


HF SELLS RATHER LESS EXPENSIVE ENGINE STANDS

if its just a short block, assembly, or bare block,your storing,paint the non-machined surfaces after careful clean and degrease, cover the machined surfaces with LPS#3 then place the block in several layers of plastic engine bags
duct taped closed, first coat the cylinders and pistons with marvel mystery oil,or LPS #3, If its a long block, loosen all the rockers so no springs or lifters are under tension,then coat the cylinders and pistons with marvel mystery oil,assuming the heads are bolted on,the engine with the cylinder heads bolted on, will need upper cylinder lube, so, squirt about 3 teaspoons of marvel mystery oil into the spark plug holes,remove the oil pan and coat the crank and rods with marvel mystery oil, reinstall the oil pan with a minimum of 6 bolts, snug but not tight,
buy a can of LPS #3
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I usually, have the block high pressure spray and chemically cleaned before I carefully inspect it for cracks, if I see anything suspicious I have the block magnetically checked
[b]AFTER CAREFUL CLEANING, machines surfaces should be sprayed with a protective spray, and cast surfaces painted, if your asking can you spray it on a bare block to prevent rust from forming in honed bore walls the answer is yeah! Ive done that on most of the bare blocks in storage on the shelves in the shop then I've wrapped the blocks in trash bags and placed them in large plastic storage for long term storage

Image
Image the new wd40 rust preventative spray works far better than the older version
sprayed over all external machined surfaces[/b] then thread the old spark plugs into the plug threads finger tight, tape all openings like exhaust ports./intake ports, with duct tape,then, stick the block in a 40 gallon plastic trash bag sealed with duct tape, reseal the block twice more so that you have 3 separate 40 gallon trash bags over the block each sealed separately with duct tape. place the engine off the floor on a shelf or on an engine stand (screw the bolts right thru the plastic to mount it)
Ive stored engines for over 5 years this way and they come out in perfect condition ,
in an ideal world youll place the sealed block on a shelf up off the floor in a warm DRY AREA WITH GOOD VENTILATION
http://www.northerntool.com/images/product/images/145512_lg.jpg

if the engines a long block with the heads already installed and cam installed, if its coated with moly assembly lube it will usually be fine for years in storage. moly assembly lube actually gets into the micro pores in the metal and forms a protective barrier that won,t wash off easily, even in hot oil,kept in a dry place,like on an engine stand wrapped in several plastic bags so no rust forms, the moly assembly lube will sit on the lifters and cam lobes for years, its actually micro embedded in the surface
just add a good fresh oil and a zinc wear additive just prior to start up,and youll be fine, obviously it helps to pre prime it to fill the oil filter and blocks oil passages prior to starting it, and storing the engine with all the rocker loose so your not compressing springs while it sits and squirting a bit of marvel mystery oil in each spark plug hole just prior to installing the plugs and turning the engine over while its being re-primed helps
put a thin coat of LPS #3 oil on everything then use 2 garbage bags, and put them on in opposite directions.
that storing parts that are well oiled in double heavy duty plastic trash bags that are duct taped closed works reasonably well short term, but a good spray down with LPS #3
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lasts longer than oil
and use of larger plastic storage boxes, stored off the floor on shelving,
to place the parts in those trash bags in significantly helps reduce the chances of moisture intrusion
if your driving the car before you store it, finding a dry place to store the car where the cars temp will not fluctuate constantly, that can cause condensation to form.
adding some fuel stabilizer and 8 oz of marvel mystery oil to the fuel tank and running the car for a few miles prior to storage,helps prevent fuel system problems.
disconnect and remove the battery and make sure theres fresh anti-freeze coolant at at least a 50%/50% RATIO IN THE RADIATOR TO REDUCE CORROSION,
you really don,t need to get some special product to coat the cylinders with an oil protective film, just change your oil and filter the day before you store the car, and I,d add at least 1 quart of marvel mystery oil to the crank case and just before parking it, slowly dribble 4 oz or so of marvel mystery oil down the carb at idle, it will cause a good deal of smoke but it will also coat the pistons and combustion chambers with a protective oil film greatly reducing the chances of corrosion.
fill the tires with air and if you can put the car up on jack stands at a height that just allows the tires to set firmly on the floor with little suspension weight on them.
covering the car with a breathable but water resistant car cover , rather than plastic sheet helps

http://www.carcoversdirect.com/car-covers
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HEAVY MIL THICKNESS PLASTIC STORAGE BAGS ARE EVEN BETTER

http://www.competitionproducts.com/CP-H ... o/8101-10/


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http://www.homedepot.com/h_d1/N-5yc1v/R-202522825/h_d2/ProductDisplay?langId=-1&storeId=10051&catalogId=10053
read these links

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=4793&p=13024&hilit=+zinc+moly#p13024

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=1191&p=4497&hilit=+zinc+moly#p4497

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=282&p=2022&hilit=assembly+lube+moly#p2022

http://www.eastwood.com/paints/hi-temp- ... aints.html

http://www.northerntool.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/ProductDisplay?storeId=6970&langId=-1&catalogId=4006970&PHOTOS=on&TEST=Y&productId=19976
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: storing a spare engine

Postby grumpyvette » January 25th, 2009, 2:25 pm

STORING A CAR FOR MONTHS OR YEARS
give the car a good wash and wax job.
PLACING a BREATHEABLE car cover over the car and not storing anything ON the car is always helpful
IT CERTAINLY WOULD NOT HURT IN A WELL VENTILATED GARAGE, too remove or at least loosen the gas cap but Id also suggest adding some fuel stabilizer, and running some injector cleaner thru the tank and injectorsand putting the car on jack stands, as well as removing the battery from the car and loosening all the spark plugs and squirting a tablespoon of marvel mystery oil into each cylinder then rotating the engine several times and repeating adding the marvel mystery oil to the cylinders before replacing the plugs, before car storage.
and it sure won,t hurt to do an oil & filter change.
WHEN YOU GO TO START IT AFTER STORING IT,YOU'LL WANT TO REMOVE THE SPARK PLUGS AND REPLACE THE BATTERY , PROBABLY WITH A NEW BATTERY, ADD NEW FUEL, ETC, SPIN THE ENGINE WITH THE STARTER WITH THE PLUGS REMOVED FOR A FEW SECONDS TO GET THE OIL MOVING, then install NEW properly gaped spark plugs

IF it was my car ID fill the coolant with fresh antifreeze, and replace the transmission fluid and rear differential fluids and Id replace the oil and fuel filters, when I went to pour in the new oil ID include one quart of marvel mystery oil in the sump and ID add 6-8 oz to a full tank of fuel along with at least one can of injector cleaner and the rest of the oil in the engine would be any good quality oil like HAVOLINE,TEXACO,SHELL, OR MOBILE ONE, or a blend of almost any mix of those but change the oil the first time at no more than 3000 miles,to remove crud that may have accumulated and ID sure inspect for moisture or coolant in the oil the first few times I drove the car or ran the engine.
btw don,t be alarmed if it smokes a bit at first, its going to take a good 5-15 minutes for oil in the upper cylinders to burn off,the seals and gaskets to seat, swell and seal, and rings to free up after sitting for several years, in some cases and moisture to burn out of the exhaust

Ive replaced the fuel , and oil, spark plugs and fuel , air and oil filters, and battery, in cars that sat UN-touched for 3-5 years and they started up and ran , that doesn,t mean they were not damaged by corrosion by sitting for years, with moisture collecting in the engine.
I try to start and let my corvette engine run and get up to operational temp at least once a month and preferably once a week, as it helps lube seals and helps keep the battery charged and moisture out of the oil, but keep in mind in Florida there's high humidity 99% of the time and temps rarely drop below 75F and in a closed shop, and temps in the closed shop can easily exceed 100F at mid day.
if your humidity levels are lower once every two weeks to once a month should be fine as long as the battery stays charged
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: storing a spare engine

Postby grumpyvette » July 29th, 2009, 7:48 pm

btw if your storing an engine thats partly assembled for any length of time spray the clean surfaces down with marvel mystery oil and use two plastic trash bags and DUCT tape to seal it up during down times, that goes an amazing way toward preventing rust,
if its a used engine your storing,, once its on the stand, drain the oil, then turn it over several times to drain all the coolant, and refill it with about 7 qts of oil to insure the crank and bearings are covered,cover it with a couple plastic trash bags but don,t seal it until your 100% sure no moisture remains in the block, remove the spark plugs and squirt oil in each cylinder then turn the engine over several times to lube the rings and upper cylinders, back off the rockers to reduce the valve spring strain on the valve train, then loosely replace the plugs finger tight, once its been sitting for a month or so you can re-oil the valve train and re-oil the upper cylinders and use duct tape to seal the trash bags, just don,t make the mistake of storing a used engine with coolant in the block tightly wrapped in plastic or you'll unwrap a block of rusted crap in a few years.

LEAVE a EASILY SPOTTED NOTE TAPED to the engine and a duplicate copy stuck in the carburetor detailing what you did and whats required to do before starting the engine detailing what needs to be checked, filled, replaced and adjusted
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temporarily remove spark plugs and squirt a few tablespoons of marvel mystery oil into each cylinder and spin the engine over by hand to lube and coat the upper cylinders with oil to reduce rust and then replace the plugs finger tight, back off the rockers so the valve springs and valve train are not under load tape the exhaust ports with duct tape, and place a few taped garbage bags or a decent engine storage bag around the engine to reduce rust forming. place the engine stand in a fairly dry and well ventilated area.
Tips for "pickling" your Car/Engine for Winter Storage

http://www.dccarcare.com/tipowk/tipowk15.html

Here are some good tips to tell your customers about how to store their classic rod for the winter, or just for an extended period of time.



Here are some engine related tips for "pickling" a car for storage:

1.) Make sure your gas tank is full. Additives like STA-BIL will help as long as you run the engine to get it throughout the fuel system.

2.) Make sure your coolant mixture is correct - even if your car won't be stored under freezing conditions. This will inhibit corrosion. If you refresh of flush the radiator, make sure the engine runs long enough to cycle your new mixture throughout.

3.) Change the engine oil prior to storage. Dirty oil can cause premature bearing failure if left in an unused engine.

4.) Remove the plugs and spray some "upper cylinder lubricant" into the cylinders before replacing the plugs.

Your engine will provide years of trouble free performance if properly mantained. Take the time to pickle your engine if it's going into storage. You'll be glad you did!

– Tech Tip courtesy of Blueprint Engines
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: storing a spare engine

Postby grumpyvette » March 6th, 2011, 11:11 am

Long-Term Storage the Correct Way
1958 Chevy Impala

Unrestored classics like my 58 Impala didn't survive to win national championships by being stored improperly. I learned lots of my tips below from people that also owned and kept old cars in excellent condition, I salute them for sharing their knowledge and letting me see their cars!

Long-term storage to my way of thinking is anything over a month. In 30 days, lots of things can start going wrong if you don't store a car right. Modern cars have their own problems since they can run a healthy battery down in less than a week sometimes with all the memory functions that have to keep going if you don't disconnect the battery.

Without getting into boring detail, here are the basics of good long-term storage:

1. Vehicles are always better off being driven on a regular basis.
2. If you must store, store indoors where the wind can't get to your car.
3. Car covers are ONLY for indoors use out of the wind, no matter what they advertise!
4. It is better to let a car sit for months than to run it once a week for a few minutes. The reason is that you can't get the engine and other drivetrain parts warmed up enough to do any good and you will create condensation in the crankcase and exhaust that will help kill your car.
5. Give your car a bath and good coat of wax including chrome trim before storage. Use a product like Wurth Rubber care on the seals/rubber trim, and Vinylex on tires.
6. Clean the interior, use Lexol on the leather and Vinylex on the vinyl before storage. No need to go overboard and leave it dripping, just a normal treatment.
7. A pan of charcoal bricks (not the type with fuel in them though!) in a pie tin on newspaper inside the car will help soak up odors. Leave windows cracked just a little to let some air circulate and let window seals relax so they seal better in the spring.
8. Remove important papers from the car/glove box. Try to leave the HVAC system in OFF mode to help keep critters out.
9. Give the car a good run and get it fully warmed up right before storage.
10. Fresh fluids at this point are a good idea. Oil and filter, anti-freeze, power steering fluid, tranny fluid and brake fluid should all be changed right before storage. A week or two before storage is OK except the oil, make that as fresh as possible.
11. Once the car is parked where it will sit, remove the battery, store in a cool dry place and trickle charge it once a month. Be sure to check the water level and fill if necessary.
UPDATE: Reader Bill Wright reminded me that a modern trickle charger is a must have item for people that store vehicles for any period of time. In fact I have 6 Battery Tender Juniors on various old cars, and farm/lawn vehicles at my place. Since using them, dead batteries are a thing of the past and my batteries are lasting longer. Modern trickle chargers won't cause acid to boil away like a full fledged charger, but you should still check fluid every month just to be sure. We hope to carry a battery charger for this purpose in the near future.
12. Fill the gas tank before storing with fresh quality fuel. If you drive your car so little that last years gas is still mostly in the tank, then siphon it off and use it in the lawn mower or dispose of properly! Fresh gas will last a full year if kept at a fairly stable temperature below 80 degrees. Filling the tank helps prevent condensation which helps rust tanks and fuel systems. Fuel additives for storage are not needed if storing for less than a year.
13. With carburetor equipped cars, it sometimes helps to disconnect the fuel pump (plug the line so it doesn't drain) and run the car till the carb is dry. BUT, I have stored cars for many years without draining the carbs, and taken the carbs apart and found no deposits or "varnish" in the fuel bowls. Fuel will evaporate out of the carbs within a week anyway. On fuel injected cars, there is no bowl as such so don't worry about it.
14. Do NOT put your car on jack stands or blocks under the frame. This lets the suspension droop and puts the springs and bushings in an unnatural state. If you want to prevent flat spots on tires (not a problem with modern radials anyway) support the car at the outermost points of the suspension so the springs and shocks/struts are in a natural state. Be sure to keep tires (remember the spare) at the correct air pressure and try to keep them away from electric motors or high heat.
UPDATE: Bill Wright, a reader of these pages offers this from his experience: (NOTE: I have never had the dry rot that Bill mentions, when storing on a dry floor, but DRY is the key there. A good way to insulate a concrete or even dirt/gravel floor for better storage is to put down one or two layers of thick plastic sheeting under a layer of old carpet. The carpet won't blow around if the wind gets in when the door is open, and the plastic keeps moisture from coming up and rusting the underside of your vehicle, still, read what Bill has to say:

Much as I get "ridiculed" by friends, I always park all our seldom used vehicles with 1x10s (or 1x8s or 1x12s - whatever fills the bill) under the tires. In my mind, it keeps the tire tread surface (and surrounding area of the sidewalls) away from the concrete - and the moisture-absorbing characteristics of the concrete. (I suppose this would be less of an issue if I had a sealed/epoxy-coated floor in our storage building). I've left old/scrap tires sitting over in a corner of the building in the past and, after a period of time, discovered the portion of the tires closest to the floor became dry-rotted/cracked. I know they weren't this way prior to "going to the corner". Anyways, I have yet to experience any dry-rotting of tires, even some that have sat for years, after storing tires with wood under them. Seems to work fine for me!!

1. It's a good idea to put mouse bait/traps out in any garage. If you don't they will get under your car cover or sheets and make nests (usually near the base of the windshield), you will see their little pee spots on your hood! Left to run amok, mice can build nests in air intakes (seal them off with bags if you can get to them, and check airboxes/air cleaners before first starting), and even in the glove box or inside the seats.
2. When starting the vehicle back up after storage, remove all your covers, bags over pipes, intakes, pans of charcoal, put the freshly charged battery back in and check all fluid levels. If possible disable the ignition (or just don't set the choke on carb equipped cars) and let the engine crank to build oil pressure. I like the idea of a few cranks at slow speed with no oil pressure rather than the first few cranks at 3000 rpm with no oil pressure! Try to get the engine to a slow idle as soon as possible till things warm up. Of course on modern computer cars, you have no control over this. Make the first mile or so at slow speed and keep the rev's low till things warm up. Test the brakes before you get on the highway. Drums and disks WILL rust some unless you store your car in one of those sealed bags (not a bad idea, but I have found it unnecessary if you have a good garage) but that will go away after the first few stops.
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: storing a spare engine

Postby grumpyvette » April 3rd, 2011, 2:04 pm

rayquayle posted these pictures of a block he got shipped from summit racing

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heres an example of a newly machined block that was shipped without proper rust proofing
TOOLS TO REMOVE CRUD
viewtopic.php?f=51&t=125&p=155&hilit=+block+engine+paint#p155
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Features and Benefits:

Set includes following sizes: 1/2", 3/4", and 7/8"
Flexible filaments with a silicon carbide material are engineered to provide the correct pressure to create an ideal hone
Great polishing tool which provides excellent results when used for deburring and edge reducing
Great for a wide variety of automotive, hydraulic, valve, pipe and tube applications
The brushes have a sturdy, self-centering stem

Recommended RPM: 350rpm to 700rpm. All brushes have a 1/4" hex shaped quick disconnect shank. No tools needed to switch the brushes.

http://www.tooltopia.com/astro-pneumati ... lebase_18u
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http://www.harborfreight.com/6-piece-wi ... -1341.html
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http://www.harborfreight.com/10-piece-t ... 95947.html
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http://www.harborfreight.com/1500-watt- ... 96289.html

Image
http://www.harborfreight.com/4-piece-ai ... 95159.html
viewtopic.php?f=27&t=3724&p=44292&hilit=engine+stand+grade+eight#p44292

its a shame the block was not carefully rust proof barrier coated before it was packed and shipped, but from the pictures it appears to be cosmetic rather than functional damage, to the block surface, that should clean up with machine oil and emery cloth, just be sure to clean the internal oil passages and degrease and paint the blocks non-machined surfaces to prevent further oxidation and lock in micro crud, its always a good idea to paint the non-machined surfaces and clean the oil passages, and coat the machined surfaces with a rust protection barrier oil,and store the block in sealed plastic bag with some desiccant, hanging below the engine in a separate cardboard package not in contact with the block during even short term storage.
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LPS #3 leaves a grease/wax barrier that lasts for years on a well sealed engine block or crank machined surfaces
Image the new wd40 rust preventative spray works far better than the older version
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/MOR-99400/

Image

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http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=51&t=125
viewtopic.php?f=27&t=3724&p=44292&hilit=engine+stand+grade+eight#p44292

http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/item.a ... &catid=859

http://www.jegs.com/p/Moroso/Moroso-Eng ... 8/10002/-1

http://www.jegs.com/p/B-B/B-B-Engine-St ... 9/10002/-1

http://www.competitionproducts.com/CP-H ... o/8101-10/
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: storing a spare engine

Postby Indycars » April 3rd, 2011, 5:06 pm


With all the horses being abused in those pictures, its a wonder that PITA is not involved !!! 8-)
Rick
Too much is just enough!!!

- Check Out My Dart SHP Engine Project: viewtopic.php?f=69&t=3814
- Need a Dynamic Compression Ratio Calculator: viewtopic.php?f=99&t=4458
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Re: storing a spare engine

Postby grumpyvette » April 5th, 2011, 12:59 pm

rayquayle posted these pictures posted below

its nice to see the cosmetic damage was minimal, although I'm sure it took some time to refurbish the surface condition

If your wondering,After a bit of clean up, I think the block shipped will be alright:

Before
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After
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Before
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After
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Before
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After
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Before
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After
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[120]Before[/SIZE]
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After
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Before
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After
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Also, well done to Summit. They gave me a $100 gift certificate for a shipping problem with the block not being able to be shipped to my local airport and when I showed them the pictures of the block, they gave me another $200 gift certificate. These weren't amounts they offered, it is what I asked for and they agreed without any hassle. I can't say fairer than that.

thanks to Summit.
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: storing a spare engine

Postby grumpyvette » April 5th, 2011, 7:03 pm

:?: at this point Id degrease all the un-machined cast surfaces and carefully tape the machined surfaces,
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Id paint the un-machined surfaces, after installing shrapnel screens with EPOXY (J&B WELD)
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Id use 3/4" rubber corks to block the lifter bores and Id install BRASS freeze plugs
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and BRASS or steel oil passage plugs , and drill the pass side oil gallery plug with a .031 drill bit to lube the chain cam drive and prevent air from being trapped in the oil passages slowing oil from reaching the lifter bores.
Id install cam bearings
Id carefully groove the distributor lower bore about .050 wide and about .010 deep so oil sprays directly on the cam/distributor gear contact area.
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then ID oil the MACHINED SURFACES
BETWEEN work sessions, keep the engine in a dry reasonably warm area up on the engine stand

(1) spray machined surfaces with oil

(2) use an engine protective bag and DUCT TAPE

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http://www.usplastic.com/catalog/item.a ... &catid=859

http://www.jegs.com/p/Moroso/Moroso-Eng ... 8/10002/-1

http://www.jegs.com/p/B-B/B-B-Engine-St ... 9/10002/-1

http://www.competitionproducts.com/CP-H ... o/8101-10/

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IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: storing a spare engine

Postby grumpyvette » October 10th, 2012, 8:18 pm

HEY GRUMPY? I want to get a 327 that's been sitting for 7 years. Motor was fine when left. What steps should I take before g starting? Already have plans on spinning the oil pump to get oil flowing. Should I lube pistons? Any other tips? Thanx.

now Ive just got to point out that if the engine was just stored as it was when last used that several valve springs have been fully or near fully compressed for 7 years and several lifters and cam lobes have been under a rather significant surface load,next several cylinders have had the rings bear on the same section of the bore surface with minimal or little oil and if theres been coolant in the engine , it could have slowly rusted the external cylinder casting surface.
if you correctly store an engine you first over fill it with clean oil, fresh antifreeze and back off the rockers so the valve trains not under stress and ideally seal the cylinder and exhaust ports after removing the spark plugs and squirting some oil in each cylinder and rotating the engine, them plug the cars exhaust and air filters with something like a large trash bag and some rubber bands or tape.
the idea is to limit any moisture access, as moisture in the air will condense and cause issues in any engine thats not having the oil reach 215Ff to boil it off regularly if it has free access to outside moist air, just like a cool glass, outer surface collects moisture from the air.Id also replace the fuel filter and drain,flush the fuel lines and fuel tank and at least add a couple gallons of fresh fuel and some M.M.O. to fresh engine oil, and a good fuel system cleaner additive, .

If it was my engine ID pull it down and inspect it carefully,and reassemble it with fresh freeze plugs and gaskets,(rings and bearings would be replaced only if needed, and only if inspection showed it was required) but Id be the first guy in line to admit that Ive seen several cars that were stored 10 plus years just have minimal maintenance performed that ran ok after a few hours, but Ive also see several that developed issues from internal corrosion or bad gaskets, etc.

but at an absolute minimum ID suggest pulling the plugs and squirting some MARVEL MYSTERY OIL in the cylinders, and spinning it with the starter while the coil is disconnected before replacing the plugs with fresh ones, and doing an oil change, fuel and oil filters and fresh spark plugs and coolant, fresh fuel and resetting the valves and ignition timing and checking the belts and hoses
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: storing a spare engine

Postby grumpyvette » October 21st, 2014, 10:41 am

I got asked how to place a recent purchase of a salvage yard engine in the back of a pick-up truck so it won,t roll around and damage the engine or the truck bed?
if you have a spare engine stand you can mount the engine on that stand and place the whole stand with engine mounted in the pick-up bed,then tie it off securely and transport it that way,along with a engine crane you can tow or disassemble to lift it in and out of the pick-up bed. but I find most guys either don,t have or don,t want to use the one and only engine stand they own for that use!
yes if your the owner of a welder and a drill press you can sure fabricate an engine transport frame, and theres lots of options from movers dollys to engine stands
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this may sound rather "REDKNECK" but I see it done frequently, guys take two old used tires like from a corvette and stack them then tie rope thru the center so the center hole where the wheel normally fits on both tires stays lined up and then they just place that in the back of a pick-up truck and drop the engine so the oil pan centers on the wheel hole, the engine weight compresses the two tires, the rubber cushions the engine ,just be sure to tie it off so it can,t slide on hard braking or acceleration or sharp corners
that way youll have zero dollars invested in transporting the engine and no damage to the pick up bed!
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http://www.harborfreight.com/material-h ... 93888.html
lots of guys just throw spare engines on a car transport trailer and tie them down, rather than use a truck bed
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THERE ARE LARGE HEAVY WALL PLASTIC BOXES DESIGNED FOR ENGINE STORAGE AND TRANSPORT
http://www.scribnerplastics.com/engcase.htm

viewtopic.php?f=27&t=3724&p=44300&hilit=trailer+crane#p44300

viewtopic.php?f=27&t=845&p=1281&hilit=trailer+crane#p1281
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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