parts prep cleaning



parts prep cleaning

Postby grumpyvette » January 23rd, 2012, 9:40 am

" hey grumpyvette?
I have a new Melling oil pump for my engine rebuild. All other new parts I have installed, I washed first - pistons, cam, pushrods, rockers - with some pretty dirty looking crud coming off most of it.
I wash things in clean mineral turps in 1 half of a 20 litre plastic container that's cut down lengthwise, and all the dirt/metal/whatever shows up pretty clearly in the bottom of the clear liquid.
Should I pull a new oil pump apart, or install it as is? I don't have a small inch/lbs torque wrench and don't know what the torque would be anyway for the four small bolts that hold it together. Are they Loctited?
Or can I rely on it being clean enough from the factory?
"



this is a HUGELY over looked subject, thanks for bringing it up,for discussion.
anytime you want to see just how much craps trapped in those coatings on the surface, of a part, right out of a package, use a carefully cut, and cleaned, clear milk gallon bottle, or clean plastic dish pan or clean plastic bucket and a brush with solvent to clean a brand new part like an oil pump, so the sludge draining off the part leaves the residue in the bottle, youll be amazed at the trapped crud in many products, crud that would shortly be embedded in bearings if not removed prior to assembly.

parts like oil pumps and timing chains are very commonly coated with micro crud from shipping
most metal internal engine parts come from factory packaging with some type of wax or grease film on the surface to reduce or repel rust or oxidation forming on parts during shipping and storage , most of these protective films collect grit dust, dirt like a huge vacuum cleaner so yes its USUALLY mandatory to clean and inspect parts, before they get installed, now most people would be absolutely shocked to find the total amount of crud trapped in many new parts, Ive seen parts come back from machine shops so full of metallic dust, chips and grit it would destroy bearings in a new engine if the parts were installed as they came back from the machine shop and I have zero doubt that does occasionally happen
as always, ITS STRONGLY SUGGESTED you read the packaging instructions from the manufacturers, and never assume any new parts are clean as they come out of packaging

in most cases a paint brush can be used to spread a cleaning solvent with a solvent like mineral spirits and high pressure air, or a clean lint free shop rag can be used to remove the dissolved surface rust retardant, but obviously these formulas vary wildly so thats not 100% sure to remove all shipping coatings on parts.and remember most of the common petroleum based solvents are flammable

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http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/ ... _200365419
[b]ULTRASONIC CLEANER?


5 BOLT COVER BIG BLOCK PUMPS[/b] HAVE 12 TOOTH GEARS THAT WORK BETTER, than the smaller 4 bolt pump 7 tooth gear pumps at providing a smooth constant flow of oil, and CAN BE USED IN BOTH SBC AND BBC APPLICATIONS
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BIG block pumps have 5 bolt covers and the pick-up in the pump body

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there are pump rebuild kits but in most cases a pump thats worn enough to require a rebuild kits best replaced
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smoothing and radiasing sharp edges helps increase oil flow rates
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small block pumps have 4 bolt covers and the pick-up in the pump covers....BRAZING the pick-up to the pump body, after verifying a 3/8"-1/2" oil pan clearance, helps prevent a common issue of having the oil pump pick-up move over time

oil pumps should be disassembled cleaned and inspected, the gear edges deburred, then carefully washed the end cap to gear clearance should be checked to be at or under .001"-.0005" and the bolts holding the cover should have lock- tite thread sealant on the threads and or lock wires the gears should be re-installed with Vaseline on the surface to insure a quick prime, and the oil pumps pick-up to oil pan floor clearance should be verified then brazed in place, Ill post related links below that you should read thru
[/b]

http://www.harborfreight.com/pack-of-36 ... -4181.html
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http://www.harborfreight.com/10-piece-t ... 95947.html
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http://www.harborfreight.com/20-gallon- ... 98332.html
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READ THESE

viewtopic.php?f=51&t=3774&p=10002&hilit=taps+dies#p10002

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=4306&p=11353&hilit=lock+wire#p11353

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=2187

viewtopic.php?f=27&t=2886&p=12701&hilit=parts+washer#p12701

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=1800

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=1257&p=2704&hilit=shimming#p2704

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=3834

viewtopic.php?f=59&t=1264&p=2715&hilit=taps+dies#p2715

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=53&p=64#p64

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=615

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=852&p=21611#p21611
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
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Re: parts prep cleaning

Postby Indycars » April 4th, 2012, 10:23 am

They are new parts, I don't need to clean them!

After looking at the picture below, this should change your mind. The parts washer was new, the solvent
was new and ALL the parts were new that I washed. It was never left open when it was not in use.


PartsWasherDirt_2141.jpg

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Re: parts prep cleaning

Postby grumpyvette » April 5th, 2012, 10:52 am

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1EH6atYy ... _embedded#!

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3CxQzfrj ... re=related

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6YbzAGa5 ... re=related


READ THRU THESE

http://www.popsci.com/diy/article/2009- ... her-filter

http://www.amazon.com/Little-Giant-Part ... sbs_misc_3

http://www.harborfreight.com/20-gallon- ... erralID=NA




you might find these videos interesting
while I totally agree its not ultra sonic , at about 170 pulses per second vs something like 30,000 for a good ultra sonic cleaner, it gets a thumbs up for red-neck ingenuity

RELATED THREADS AND LINKED INFO

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=6255&p=21695&hilit=cleaning+parts#p21695

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=6847&p=22254&hilit=parts+washer#p22254

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=6255&p=19681&hilit=parts+washer#p19681

viewtopic.php?f=27&t=2886&p=12701&hilit=parts+washer#p12701

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There are an awful lot of greasy parts in the world. Cheap parts washers barely filter the cleaning chemicals and recirculate a solution of sludge. The nice parts cleaners have a filtering system, but cost hundreds of dollars. This is a simple design for a filtering system that will make up most of the gap between your cheap parts washer and the professional units without stressing your wallet.

The $50–$100 parts washers on the market consist of a tank, a pump, a hose and a brush. Only a small piece of gauze serves as a filter, and it is almost totally ineffective. In the parts washer of the $1,000 price range, the used cleaning solution drains into a barrel on which the parts washer sits. Cleaning solution is drawn through a filter element before recirculating back through the parts-washer brush. The filtration makes all the difference. So this design swaps the crappy gauze filter for an automotive oil filter and a remote oil-filter mount, mimicing the high-end mode of operation for around $75.

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Ingredients:

(If you would prefer to purchase the parts for this conversion all at once, I've put together parts washer filter kits available in the TE eBay store.)

A cheap parts washer. Presumably you already have this. I used mine, a well used Northern Tool 20-gallon model.
Perma Cool model 1213 remote oil filter mount. Jegs p/n 771-1213 $15.99
Chevy 2 Quart Oil Filter. Napa Oil filter 21794 or equivalent. $9.16
Around 10 feet of 3/8" Air, Water, and Oil hose. McMaster p/n 5138K64. $0.84/ft
Pipe to 3/8"-hose adapter suitable for the outlet of the existing parts washer. Most of these, including mine, are 1/4" NPT, which is McMaster p/n 5346K18. $9.19/10
1/2" NPT to 3/8" hose adapter. McMaster p/n 5346K21. $11.07/5
Hose Clamps for 11/16" OD hose. McMaster p/n 5388K16. $5.28/box
Rubber Grommets for 11/16" OD hose. McMaster p/n 9600K55. $5.89/25
4x 5/16" NC bolts 1" long, 4x 5/16" washers, and 4x 5/16" NC nuts
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Parts Washer Filter Holes: Vin Marshall

First, we'll need two holes in the side of the parts-washer tank through which the hose can pass. Drill these above the normal fluid level of the tank so that a perfect seal is slightly less important. The outer diameter of your grommets will determine the size of these holes. If you use the ones I specify above, the hole size should be 1". You can drill this with a holesaw.

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Next, we will mount the filter housing. Place this housing somewhere out of the way. I chose to mount it on the back leg of the parts washer. I chose the perma-cool remote oil filter mount used here because it will fit a two-quart oil filter used on diesel trucks. The inlet and outlet ports are 1/2" NPT. Thread into those two ports 1/2" NPT to 3/8" hose-barb adapter fittings. Use teflon tape or pipe dope on all of the threaded fittings in this project. The filter mount comes with the threaded filter mount separate from the housing. Install this threaded nipple into the filter housing as per the included instructions.

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The outlet from the pump on my parts washer is 1/4" NPT. I suspect most of these cheap parts washers are made using the same pump. Check the outlet of your pump to be sure and determine exactly what fitting you need here. From that fitting, adapt to the 3/8" hose with a barbed fitting. For my setup, that meant a 1/4" NPT to 3/8" hose barb. Install that NPT to hose adapter into the outlet of the filter pump using teflon tape or pipe dope. Run a length of thye 3/8" hose from this adapter through one of the holes in the side of the tank and onto another barb to NPT adapter already threaded into the "IN" port on the top of the filter mount.
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From the hose barb on the "OUT" port of the filter mount, run a hose back into the parts washer tank through the other grommet. Leaving enough hose to move the parts washer brush around, run that hose to the original brush. Use hose clamps on all of the hose connections.



5. Changing Filters

Depending on how filthy your parts are, you'll periodically need to change filters. If the filter head is mounted below the level of the parts washer tank as mine is, you'll need to clamp off the "IN" hose to stop the siphoning of liquid as you remove the filter. I use vise-grip pliers for this. You could also install a valve - if you find that you are changing filters very frequently - or just mount the filter higher than the tank.

Your parts washer is now ready to use. For around $75 in parts, your parts washer is filtering the cleaning solution like a pro.

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http://www.grizzly.com/products/7-Gallo ... stem/H8140

READ THRU THIS SUB LINK

viewtopic.php?f=27&t=6093&p=18813&hilit=chips+filter+mill#p18813
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
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Re: parts prep cleaning

Postby Indycars » April 5th, 2012, 11:18 am

Interesting......now that's thinking outside the box! Wonder how well it worked?
Rick
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Re: parts prep cleaning

Postby grumpyvette » June 30th, 2012, 5:54 pm

I used the parts cleaner for at least a couple hours, off and on today, after throwing a bunch of assorted bolts, and small metal parts, in a mix of diesel fuel, carb cleaner acetone and toluene in a 1 gallon can to soak over nite, I then removed the bolts and washed them in the parts cleaner , and used my drill with a wire brush to remove stubborn residue, separated by dunking parts in solvent and use of a drill and wire brush again,to remove crud from bolt threads and today . its absolutely amazing how much better parts go together and how consistent torque readings are if the parts are properly cleaned and lubed before assembly.
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http://www.mcmaster.com/#thread-forming-taps/=ke38k5
http://www.mcmaster.com/#standard-taps/=ke36u2
USE a thread cleaning tap and high pressure air to clean female threads, that works fine on female threads, but a wire rotary brush on a drill after soaking the bolts in a 50%/50% mix of diesel fuel and acetone for at least a few minutes,(throwing the bolts in a stainless steel pot you buy for that application, as they get removed so they soak the maximum time before you clean them is a good Idea) to loosen or dissolves crud and rust, (I purchased this set, gave the wife the smaller three and use the larger one as a bolt box thats almost always 1/2 full of diesel/acetone mix)
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http://www.harborfreight.com/stainless- ... 94829.html
obviously if you use power tools a face shield is a good idea.
you can,t get anything close to repeatable torque wrench readings unless all the threads are clean and your using the correct sealants or lubes
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http://www.harborfreight.com/adjustable ... 46526.html
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any time your working around power tools especially cutting tools a face shield is a good idea, cutting discs on die grinders and similar tools can shater UN-expectedly with painful results
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IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: parts prep cleaning

Postby grumpyvette » December 17th, 2012, 7:05 pm

POSTED BY "TRIPLE5"
"I've always believed in washing and cleaning new parts before they go into an engine, and today, I did a little experiment that demonstrated the value of this practice.

The picture below is of a container in which I just washed 8 new valves and springs (half a set).

After I washed them, the liquid still looked clean and I couldn't see anything in the bottom but, when I put a magnet under the dish and swirled it around a bit, this was the result.

These parts were brand new and went straight from their boxes into the washing dish.

I did the same with a new Melling camshaft and got even more from that, but didn't take a picture.

I'll now be taking all my new lifters apart and washing them too before the go in. And of course, I'll change the oil and filter after the first 30 minutes running.

Don't trust new parts for cleanliness.

Mike."





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IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: parts prep cleaning

Postby Indycars » January 8th, 2013, 7:41 pm


I have a couple of those high strength neo magnets from KJ Magnetics in my parts washer to pick up any metal. There was no doubt they were doing their job, because you could not see the magnet for all the metal attached to them.

I was changing out the solvent and wanted to clean the crud of the magnets, but could only get some of it off with a rag. I wanted to be perfectly clean before I start cleaning the valve body for my 200-4R trans. Then it hit me that I might be able to use the same modeling clay that I used to measure engine clearances with to wipe the magnet on to remove the metal.......it worked!!!

The clay would have looked a lot worse, but I had removed 80% of the metal with my rag before I used the modeling clay. Plus there is alot you can't see, since it's on the other side and internal to the clay.

Metal_In_ClayFromMagnet.jpg
MagnetClay.jpg


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- Check Out My Dart SHP Engine Project: viewtopic.php?f=69&t=3814
- Need a Dynamic Compression Ratio Calculator: viewtopic.php?f=99&t=4458
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Re: parts prep cleaning

Postby grumpyvette » January 8th, 2013, 8:29 pm

good idea!
Ive never tried that, and it is SO OBVIOUS, now that I see you do it!
I have usually just poured melted a 50%/50% mix or bees wax and paraffin I use as the basis of most cast bullet lube I use.
over the magnets, let it cool /harden and peal it off, after its hard, it surrounds and captures the fine metallic dust, locks it in place and once its hardened makes removal fairly easy, and you can use a heat gun to heat the wax in an aluminum muffin pan later with a magnet under the area holding the wax,this allows the fine metallic crap to sink and separate to the bottom, once cooled the ingot of wax can be removed and the bottom layer with the trapped crap is easily cut off, thus allowing re-use of the wax mix for its original intended use.
I have the wax mix handy because its used as part of the bullet lubricant and muffin pans and a furnace are used to melt lead ingots for bullet casting
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
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Re: parts prep cleaning

Postby Indycars » January 8th, 2013, 8:46 pm


Sounds like the wax would work even better if you have it handy, but either way, it gets the job done!

Rick
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- Check Out My Dart SHP Engine Project: viewtopic.php?f=69&t=3814
- Need a Dynamic Compression Ratio Calculator: viewtopic.php?f=99&t=4458
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Re: parts prep cleaning

Postby chromebumpers » January 8th, 2013, 9:04 pm

As I'm reading through all of this great information I was trying to answer on my own why are you usng an oil filter and not a fuel filter? Is it because of the filter mount available only with oil filters? Wouldn't a thin liquid, filter more efficiently through a fuel filter?
Rich
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Re: parts prep cleaning

Postby grumpyvette » January 9th, 2013, 9:06 am

chromebumpers wrote:As I'm reading through all of this great information I was trying to answer on my own why are you using an oil filter and not a fuel filter? Is it because of the filter mount available only with oil filters? Wouldn't a thin liquid, filter more efficiently through a fuel filter?


I think I know what your thinking, but an oil filter generally has many MANY times larger filter medium surface area. larger in and out flow path openings and can hold a great deal more crud than a average fuel filter can before it restricts flow, plus the thinner fluid viscosity flows thru it with almost zero restriction, because of the much larger filter surface area, the only potential problem I see is that the cheap oil filters use a paper filter medium that may fall apart if submersed in a mixture that might be partly detergent, and water based, but the synthetic filter mediums should not be as fragile

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HERES WHAT THAT OIL FILTER ELEMENT LOOKS LIKE UNDER A MICROSCOPE
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IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
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Re: parts prep cleaning

Postby grumpyvette » January 16th, 2013, 10:53 am

IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: parts prep cleaning

Postby grumpyvette » March 9th, 2014, 12:15 pm

thinking ahead to result of block prep
I recently helped a guy disassemble and inspect an engine that had had a cam he install fail, the internal damage to the bearings and block walls was very obvious, he thought we could just change the oil and flush the block with some diesel fuel, and install a new cam and new lifters and resisted my suggestion that we pull the block out, carefully clean and inspect it after removing all the oil passage plugs and bearings and pressure clean it before we carefully measured and ordered new bearings, passage plugs etc.If your rebuilding an older engine, especially one that's been sitting for years , in a car or in some guys shop, or had a bearing or cam fail, like an early hemi, or Pontiac 421 , or ford 427 that you just got a deal on, that sat in some guys shop for decades, be sure you totally dis-assemble and clean each of that engines component parts an amazing collection of crud can be , or have collected inside the rocker shafts and push rods and in places like the blocks oil passages in any engine thats 40-60 plus years old,.... get out the rifle bore brushes solvent and high pressure air , and solvents and REPEATEDLY CLEAN THE PARTS , several times.
the old oil mixed with metallic debris can be a hard or clay like mass clogging passages that hot oil will eventually dissolve and transfer to the bearings and cam/lifter contact area, piston rings etc, insuring rapid wear, or parts failure, and internal damage, if not removed prior to engine reassembly

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READ LINK

http://www.enginerepairshop.com/cleanin ... parts.html
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CLEANING ENGINE PARTS

Cleaning engine parts is one of the most basic procedures that your machine shop will do, yet it is also one of the most important parts of the engine repair procedure. Before you can really inspect the parts for your engine to determine what will need to be done to them, they have to be cleaned. If the parts aren’t clean, it’s hard to measure them and inspect them for defects etc.

If you are restoring an engine and want it to look original, then it must be completely cleaned of all rust, old paint etc so that you can refinish it after it is assembled.

Cleaning engine parts is also one of the most time consuming parts of the engine repair procedure so anything that can be done to make it easier will help reduce costs.

There are several methods that are generally used to clean parts in a modern Automotive Machine Shop.

THE SPRAY WASHER

Most shops have a “spray washer” that is used for quickly cleaning engine parts prior to inspection. This machine is basically a big dishwasher type of cabinet that has a strong soap and hot water solution in it. The parts are placed on a turntable and the solution is sprayed at them under very high pressure. This gets most of the oil, grease and other road dirt off the parts so that they can be worked on. This is what we use to clean cylinder heads before we check them for cracks and resurface them. We also use this machine to rinse engine blocks after machining to remove honing oil etc.
HOT TANK

Hot tanking is the traditional way to clean dirty cast iron engine blocks, heads etc. The hot tank is just a big metal tank with a very nasty, caustic hot water solution in it. The parts are submerged in the solution and allowed to soak for many hours with the solution slowly circulating around them. This is sometimes referred to “vatting” or "boiling" the block, because it is being soaked in a large “vat” of almost boiling liquid. A hot tank does a good job of cleaning engine parts but does not always remove all of the rust and old paint. Because of environmental rules and regulations, a lot of shops are doing away with this method of cleaning.

Aluminum parts cannot be cleaned in a hot tank as they will dissolve.
THERMAL CLEANING and STEEL SHOT BLASTING

Thermal cleaning of engine parts has been used in the automotive machine shop business for at least 25 years or so. In this method the parts are loaded into a large oven and baked at a temperature of about 500 degrees. This basically burns off all of the oil, grease, carbon, old paint etc. This is very similar to using the self cleaning cycle on your home oven. Some of these ovens will bake the parts for 7 to 8 hours, while others are constructed differently and use an open flame which can do the same job in about an hour.

Once the parts have been run through the oven, the next step is to put them in another machine called a steel shot blaster. This machine bombards the now dry parts with very small steel beads. This removes any remaining rust, paint etc as well as the burnt residue of oil and carbon. Once the parts come out of the shot blaster, they look like brand new castings.

One last very important part of this cleaning method is to “tumble” the parts in order to remove any remaining steel shot. Even the smallest particle of shot can cause damage to a new engine so it is imperative that every bit of it is removed. Some shot blasters have a tumble cycle built into them while others require the parts to be put in a separate tumbler that rolls them around to remove the shot. This is the type of system we use and have not had any issues with the steel shot.

The other very real advantage to this method is that there is no dirty cleaning solution to have to dispose of. All you end up with is some fine dust from the shot blaster and it can be disposed of in the trash.

Instead of an oven some shops will use a spray washer with a very strong caustic solution in it to clean the parts prior to shot blasting them. This method seems to work well as long as the parts are completely dried prior to shot blasting.
GLASS BEAD BLASTING

Cleaning engine parts with a glass bead cabinet has been done for many years in many industries. It is really the best way to clean aluminum cylinder heads even though the process of making sure that all of the glass bead particles are removed from the parts is VERY time consuming. This process also works well for many small parts such as engine valves.
SODA BLASTING

Soda blasting is a relative new process, especially for cleaning engine parts. It is very similar to using glass beads, but instead a specially made “baking soda” is used. This soda is coarser than that used at home and does a very good job cleaning parts without hurting the underlying metal in any way. Another advantage to using soda is that it easily dissolves in water so that a quick rinse is all that is needed and you don’t have to worry about left over cleaning material hurting your newly machined parts. This seems to be the up and coming method to clean parts, especially aluminum cylinder heads.
ULTRASONIC CLEANING

This is the same method that the jeweler uses to clean your Wife’s diamond rings.

Ultrasonic cleaning uses sound waves to create millions of small bubbles in a tank of cleaning solution. The parts to be cleaned are submerged in the solution and as the bubble are formed and “explode” they remove any dirt, grease, carbon etc. This method also works very well. The one disadvantage that I noticed with ultrasonic cleaning is that aluminum parts do not come out of the cleaning tank looking like new. They seem to have some discoloration to them even though they were clean. If you are going to paint the parts then this shouldn't matter.
OTHER MISCELANIOUS CLEANING METHODS

Most shops will also have a traditional parts washing sink in which a cleaning solution is circulated through a hose with a brush on the end and is used to manually clean parts. There are times that this is the only method that will really work.

We used to clean valves and some other parts in a parts tumbler type of cleaner. The parts would all go in a basket filled with large steel "beads" and then it would tumble everything together while submerged in solvent. This method worked well but I never liked the fact that it scarred up the valve stems somewhat. They do make little sleeves that you can put over the stems but its a lot of work. We find it easier and faster to just rinse the oil off the valves and then glass bead them. I can clean a set of V-8 valves in about 5 minutes this way and there is no damage to them.

So that gives you an idea as to the ways that your machine shop will clean the parts to your engine.

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READ THESE
http://www.enginebuildermag.com/2007/07 ... eal-world/

viewtopic.php?f=51&t=2919

viewtopic.php?f=51&t=125

viewtopic.php?f=51&t=976

viewtopic.php?f=51&t=7703

http://www.eastwood.com/paints/hi-temp- ... aints.html
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
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Re: parts prep cleaning

Postby grumpyvette » January 9th, 2015, 2:10 pm

IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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