broken bolt and screw plug removal



broken bolt and screw plug removal

Postby grumpyvette » November 17th, 2008, 3:15 pm

read the thread and each of its sub links BEFORE doing anything else

http://www.crankshaftcoalition.com/wiki ... _fasteners

Now the method that you use will vary with the location and type/size of the bolt, and how far below the surface it broke off, in some cases a NUT can be welded on and the combo of the larger grip surface and the heat of the welding will loosen the threaded section fairly easily.
In many cases USE OF ANTI SEIZE on the threads during the assembly process, prevents these problems, in the future.
THE TRICK with successfully using easy outs correctly is that you need to center the drilled hole (it should be about 2/3-3/4 of the bolt diam.)and drill it ALL the way thru the remaining bolt both centered and CONCENTRIC with the bolt center line and TO SOAK the bolt threads LIBERALLY over 30 minutes with a GOOD PENETRATING OIL that can reach both ends of the bolt (I strongly advise)
and use a COBALT drill with lots of oil, drill slowly and keep the bit wet or it will overheat and dull quickly

http://www.freealloil.com/ )

http://loctitefreezeandrelease.com/

Image
Image

if you can,t get free oil locally mix a 50% / 50% mix of MARVEL MYSTERY OIL AND ACETONE AS A SOLVENT/PENETRATING OIL

read this

http://www.plumbingsupply.com/pipethreadsizing.html

http://www.brokentap.com/easy-outs.html

most failures are due to rushing the job,
(not soaking a MINIMUM of 30 minutes)
(not using a good corrosion removing penetrating oil)
(applying too much torque to the easy out, if it won,t back out easily in most cases you did not use enougth oil or waited long enought)
(or and this is most of the time, not drilling the hole both concentric and all the way thru the bolt)

http://www.crustyquinns.com/tech/easyout.html

http://www.asashop.org/autoinc/may2003/techtotech.htm

"How would YOU go about trying to remove a cast iron exhaust manifold that has been in place for??? 20 years?"

well Id sure soak it down liberally and often over several days if I could wait that long,with a good penetrating oil, and Id use a small hammer to tap hard on each bolt head a good deal while I was appling that oil to allow the vibration to work the oil flow into more places,Id also get some rounded bolt head removal sockets

Okay how about tricks for keeping them from turning into the rusted ready to snap pieces of junk, in the first place?"

use grade 8 stainless and a coat of ANTISEIZE paste on the threads durringg assembly tends to prevent the problem

http://www.jegs.com/webapp/wcs/stores/servlet/CategoryDisplay?lang=-1&catalogId=10002&storeId=10001&categoryId=22449

are you aware that there ARE REVERSE TWIST drill bits available, that you can order, in many cases just drilling the broken bolt out with one thats just slightly smaller in diam. than the broken bolt section will cause the bolt fragment to back itself out of the hole its in.

http://www.texaspowerwagon.com/mnfldblt.htm

http://www.hermanscentral.com/department/left-hand-drill-bits-high-speed-steel-fractional-sizes-11545.cfm

http://www.hermanscentral.com/product/1964-3950.cfm

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=2204

http://www.toolprice.com/product/1226D/ ... Forge.html

1. Use the punch to make a dent in the center of the shaft of the bolt you wish to extract... this will help keep your drill bit centered.
in an ideal world youll have a decent center punch
Image
http://www.google.com/imgres?imgurl=htt ... 4&ct=image
so the drill won,t wander, off center in the first bit of drilling the hole for the bolt extractor

2. Use the drill supplied with the easy out kit or a similar hardened quality drill bit (it will be hardened) and drill as straight a hole as you can .. right down the center of the broken bolt for whatever distance the instructions recommend.then spray the bolt with the penetrating oil, hopefully it will soak into the treads from both ends

3.wait a few minutes then Re-Spray the bolt with liquid wrench, or free oil or the acetone trans fluid mix (sort of a lubricant for stuck bolts) and then start the reverse spiral easy out into the hole drilled in the bolt. Remember to turn the shaft counterclockwise. This will seat the easy out and tighten it up in the hole you drilled.

4. use a crescent wrench, or ideally a tap holder or something that fits the top of the reverse threaded shaft and start turning it slowly in a counter clockwise direction. This will tighten it in the hole and hopefully start unbolting the broken bolt. tapping on the easy out shank may help. heating with a torch then cooling with the penetrating oil, several times in succession usually helps

that's it... just don't break off the easy out, if it won,t budge don,t force it, just keep heating, cooling, soaking in penetrating oil and trying to turn it, it will eventually come loose.



a broken bolt/screw extractor of sufficient size, and some
http://loctitefreezeandrelease.com/


if sprayed directly on the plug it reduces the smaller parts temperature rapidly, this allows the part to shrink in diam. slightly , pulling away from the surrounding metal as the thread area won,t shrink along at the same rate due to the loss in conductivity along the thread area of heat transfer, this is exactly what happens with a steel part causing micro fractures in rust also

can be used to remove stuck pipe plugs once they are drilled
http://www.irwin.com/tools/screw-bolt-e ... 526-series

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=1480&p=6221&hilit=stripped+crank#p6221
Image
http://buy1.snapon.com/catalog/item.asp ... ir=catalog
Image

OK lets say you've screwed up and busted off a EASY-OUT hardened steel bit during the bolt removal process, now what?
obviously you'll quickly find out that standard drill bits won,t touch a l EASY-OUT hardened steel bit style bit as its far harder than most standard drill bits

you should know that hardened steel requires a slow drill speed (UNDER 300rpm in most cases) AND REQUIREs a constant flow of cooling oil, or a hardened drill bit will very quickly loose its edge, in seconds in some cases, YES IM WELL AWARE,that the tendency is to lean on the drill bit and spin it as fast as you can, which is exactly the wrong approach here, you need to apply steady pressure and low drill speeds and frequent lubrication, Ive used marvel mystery oil mixed with about 30% acetone as a lubricant for years with good results, but its very important to lube frequently,and drill slowly WD40 works as does CRC spray lube.
a hardened center punch helps center the bit and keep it from wandering off center.

http://www.ehow.com/video_4950955_drill ... steel.html

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D4q8UhbpaG0

When to Use a Carbide Drill Bit
By: Gene Rodriguez, III

Drill bits undergo a lot of stress when drilling a hole. The high-speed rotation of drill bits generates friction that, in turn, generates heat. The friction between drill bit and material leaves drill bits slightly duller after each use. The heating and cooling of the drill bit material can weaken the internal structure of the bit over time.

The Common Drill Bit
Common home repair drill bits are made of steel or High Speed Steel (HSS). Although inexpensive, common steel drill bits tend to wear out or break very quickly. HSS drill bits last longer than steel, but are more expensive. These types of drill bits are most effective when used on wood, drywall or plastics.

A Bit Stronger
Coated drill bits use another, harder material to coat steel or HSS drill bits. Titanium carbide or titanium nitride coatings can increase the lifespan of a drill bit by two to three times. These types of drill bits are useful when drilling hardwoods or thin metals.

When The Going Gets Tough
Carbide drill bits are among the strongest drill bits available for home use. Carbide drill bits are more expensive than steel or titanium coated drill bits, but will last longer and stay sharper.

Carbide drill bits are absolutely necessary when drilling stainless steel or other high-density materials. No other drill bit can handle the job.

Regardless of the material that you usually drill, a carbide drill bit will last up to 25 times longer than a common steel bit. This can make carbide drill bits an economical choice for woodworking, furniture building or other large-scale projects.

When cutting dense material, use a cutting lubricant to avoid generating excessive heat. Overheating a carbide drill bit will shorten its lifespan. Always let the drill bit do the work. Applying too much pressure will quickly dull your drill bit.

http://www.ncprogramming.com/drill_size_chart.html

http://www.thetoolhut.com/tap-drill-sizes.html

http://www.drillbitwarehouse.com/home?p ... egory_id=9
HERES A DIFFERENT OPTION

http://www.theinductor.com/

titanium drill bits, better than high speed steel but may not be hard enough

Carbide drill bits,very good but fairly expensive

diamond drill bits
--best, very expensive
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: broken bolt removal

Postby grumpyvette » November 30th, 2008, 10:13 am

If you've still got a reasonable bolt head to apply torque to with a wrench,and When everything else doesn,t seem to work on a stuck bolt, you can use or try too heat the bracket or major component with a torch or heat gun, and use gloves and hold DRY ICE , firmly against the bolt head, for several minutes.
Don,t forget to spray the threads with free oil, penetrating oil,

READ THRU THIS ALSO
http://loctitefreezeandrelease.com/
Image
http://www.freealloil.com/
Image

The difference in expansion and contraction due too the extreme temp,difference, quickly followed by a 6 point 1/2 drive socket on a breaker bar will very often allow stuck bolts to break free!
(you can usually find dry ice at major grocery stores and you wont need a great deal of it.)
and YEAH! while it seems like a P.I.T.A, to go thru all that trouble its usually faster, cheaper and less work than replacing the engine or other components, you'll ruin if you get crazy drilling it out carelessly.




read the thread and each of its sub links BEFORE doing anything else

short version, go to the local hardware store and ask for a reverse twist drill about 2/3rds the diameter of the bolt,and a matched EASY OUT BIT, use a punch to indent the center of the bolt thats broke off so the drill tip won,t wander,as you drill, be sure the drill is used concentric to the bolt center line,use it or a standard twist drill to drill completely thru the busted section of thread bolt left in the head, soak it in a solvent penetrating oil and use an EASY-OUT bit with a T-handle to spin it out

http://www.toolprice.com/product/8304D/ ... o_USA.html


"The April/May 2007 edition of Machinist's Workshop did a test of penetrating oils where they measured the force required to loosen rusty test devices. Buy the issue if you want to see how they did the test. The results reported were interesting. The lower the number of pounds the better. Mighty interesting results for simple acetone and tranny fluid! or marvel mystery oil and trans fluid, they both work with acetone as a carry and penetrating agent

Penetrating oil . Average load .. Price per fluid ounce
None ................. 516 pounds .
WD-40 .............. 238 pounds .. $0.25
PB Blaster ......... 214 pounds .. $0.35
Liquid Wrench ... 127 pounds .. $0.21
Kano Kroil ........ 106 pounds .. $0.75
ATF-Acetone mix.. 53 pounds .. $0.10

The ATF-Acetone mix was a 50/50 mix (1 to 1 ratio)."


http://www.jackstoolshed.com/index/page ... ll+Bit+Set

your local hard ware store probably has COBALT DRILL BITS, or DIAMOND DRILL BITS, but read the label you need, a bit rated for hard steel, take your time, drill a lower RPM speeds and keep the bit wet with spray oil AT ALL TIMES or it will burn and dull the edge, youll most likely need a 1/8" and a matching EASY OUT

http://www.diyfaq.org.uk/powertools/drillfaq.htm

http://www.askthebuilder.com/How_To_Dri ... ideo.shtml

http://www.secondchancegarage.com/public/671.cfm

http://www.texaspowerwagon.com/mnfldblt.htm

http://yachtsoftware.org/RemovingBrokenBolts.aspx

http://www.bimmerboard.com/forums/posts/17946

http://www.ehow.com/how_4563331_remove-broken-bolt.html

http://www.crustyquinns.com/tech/easyout.html

http://video.google.com/videosearch?oe= ... B0QqwQwAw#

http://video.google.com/videosearch?oe= ... B0QqwQwAw#

http://www.toolprice.com/category/screw ... drillbits/

http://www.toolprice.com/product/1218A/ ... moval.html

http://blog.bt-andf.com/blog/bolt-extractor/0/0/toolman

http://www.toolprice.com/product/8304D/ ... o_USA.html

Image

BTW crank pins and dowels can be removed with this tool

http://www.goodson.com/technical_suppor ... GA-600.pdf

IF youve ever rounded off a flare nut, on a master cylinder, brake caliper,transmission or radiator and you want to prevent it from happening again, theres a simple procedure for getting them loose that works about 90% of the time
IN THE FUTURE WHEN DEALING WITH FLARE NUTS, IF THEY ARE NOT EASILY TURNED, STOP AND FOLLOW THIS PROCEDURE

(1) spray with (this stuff penetrates very quickly and tends to free up stuck threads )
Image
http://www.freealloil.com/

(2) heat briefly with propane torch, being careful not to damage anything, (this expands the metal)placing a bit of water droplets about an inch or two out on the metal tubing and watching for it to evaporate gives you a guide on heat levels, and a stop heating point.
Image


(3) spray with

Image
(this stuff penetrates very quickly on the hot threads and tends to free up stuck threads and cool the nut and surrounding area contracting and breaking loose the metal surface contacts )

http://www.freealloil.com/

(4) wait 5 minutes MINIMUM and RE-SPRAY with
http://www.freealloil.com/

(5)spray for a minimum of 5-6 seconds with
http://www.loctitefreezeandrelease.com/
Image
http://www.amazon.com/Loctite-Freeze-Re ... B001VXU474
this RAPIDLY contracts the flare nut and it tends to turn easily now that its got lubricant on the threads and its cooled/frozen enough to contract to a smaller diameter, breaking the thread contact grip surface.

and immediately


(6) USE THE CORRECT WRENCH, a tubing or flare nut wrench has far more grip and contact area than a standard open end wrench so its less likely to round off the hex edges


http://www.csnstores.com/asp/show_detai ... ku=IHI1184


Image

before RE-INSTALLING COAT THE SPARK PLUG THREADS WITH ANTI-SEIZE PASTE, as it tends to prevent future problems
Image
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: broken bolt removal

Postby grumpyvette » November 1st, 2009, 5:52 pm

btw if youve ever tried to draw on a damper with a crank bolt from a local hard ware store this is frequently the result, that or stripped crank threads, ID strongly suggest use of the correct Damper tool, and use of ARP crank bolts once its properly installed, using the damper retaining bolt to draw on the damper usually results in stripped crank snout threads

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/OTC-6505/?rtype=10

http://www.atiracing.com/products/dampe ... ctions.htm

Image


next time BUY AND USE AN ARP BRAND BOLT

http://www.arp-bolts.com/

http://www.bt-andf.com/index.php

http://www.texaspowerwagon.com/mnfldblt.htm

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/ARP-134-2501/

http://www.sears.com/shc/s/p_10153_1260 ... 921x00003a

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/ARP-234-2503/

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=1798&hilit=damper

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=1480&hilit=+damper

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=1798
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Posts: 14105
Joined: September 14th, 2008, 1:40 pm
Location: florida

Re: broken bolt and screw plug removal

Postby grumpyvette » June 25th, 2010, 7:33 am

If you strip a carb mount stud the correct route to repair it is to have it tig welded and re-tapped, every shop needs a decent drill press and a set of taps, for doing those simple repairs, having a tig or mig welder set up for both steel and aluminum is a huge plus
you don,t weld in the stud, you fill the hole that's got the ruined threads with molten aluminum as you weld it into a solid mass and then, file the surface square and level with the existing carb mount surface, then re-drill and re-tap the original hole in the original location with new threads,to a depth of at least 2.5 times the stud diam.which is the minimum depth to assure the threads hold in aluminum, making it as good as new

OR

http://www.aluminumrepair.com/faqs.asp

http://www.aluminumrepair.com/technical.asp

http://durafix.com/demo/256.html

if its only partly stripped a helicoil might work,

http://www.emhart.com/pdf/Heli%20Coil/H ... ev%204.pdf

http://www.roadstarmagazine.com/modules ... le&sid=233

these may help



viewtopic.php?f=60&t=1562

http://www.ehow.com/how_5121714_remove- ... bolts.html


and if you screw up and bust the drill or TAP?
http://www.waltontools.com/

http://www.waltontools.com/prod.htm
keep in mind that a stud threaded into aluminum must have its threads engage to a depth of 2.5 times its diameter to have its maximum hold power in most aluminum and its a good idea to use red loc-tite on the threads, to prevent the stud easily backing out during the assembly process, bolts wear the threads faster
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Posts: 14105
Joined: September 14th, 2008, 1:40 pm
Location: florida


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