identify that cam?



identify that cam?

Postby grumpyvette » February 13th, 2013, 10:54 am

Im constantly amazed at the number of guys I talk with that are totally clueless about the identity of the cam shaft in the engine they have, or what cam is in their cars engine, or what cam to select for the next upgrade.
Now obviously if you buy the car used you have zero idea what parts were installed, and more than a few guys will be surprised to find the engine has a stock or aftermarket cam installed.
but I also find guys that have either had a friend select and install the cam, or build an engine or guys that have lost the documentation.
most aftermarket cams are stamped with ID numbers that can be used on the various manufacturers web sites to get a good idea about your cams specifications.
ok, if your engine runs good theres no real reason to worry about it, and it helps to keep accurate records if your the one doing the work on your cars engine, and you sure need to verify clearances during the assembly process.
keep good records as the info may prove to be very useful.
there are very good software cam profile programs available if you build engines frequently that would be well worth the cost to buy if you need to know what your dealing with, but for most guys theres two logical routes to take.
because a cam basically controls the valve train its function has a huge effect on the engine characteristics and power potential so it makes sense to know exactly what your dealing with, and to take the time and effort to verify the cams lift duration and lobe center-line is both known and correctly indexed and to take the time to verify your valve train geometry and clearances.
you will need to know factors like valve train clearance, spring load rates compression,displacement, intended rpm range, and drive train gearing before selecting a cam.
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[b]HAVING THE CORRECT TOOLS HELPS

You can start by verifying lift and duration at .050 lifter lift , with a dial indicator and test lifter tool, that won,t take long and verifying the lobe separation angle with the degree wheel will also help you identify the cam your dealing with,you can learn a good deal with a dial indicator, checking lifter and a degree wheel. btw look at both ends of the cam if its out of the engine as at times both ends have some info stamped
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MANY BUT NOT ALL cams will be stamped with ID info numbers like this crane cam, which may or may not be useful when compared to a catalog page like this one
http://www.cranecams.com/120-125.pdf

(1) you can buy a new cam, to replace the cam you currently have, and most guys will assume the manufacturer got it correct and the cam card that comes with the new cams correct.

(2) OR YOU CAN ACTUALLY BOTHER TO CHECK AND VERIFY WHAT CAM YOU HAVE INSTALLED CURRENTLY THRU SOME RESEARCH, KNOWING THE SPECS YOUR DEALING WITH AND MEASURING, LIFT DURATION AND L.S.A. (LOBE SEPARATION ANGLES)ACTUALLY DEGREEING IN THE CAM, PUTS YOU WELL AHEAD OF THE AVERAGE GUYS SKILL LEVELS
FOR THE GUYS THAT ACTUALLY CARE, A FEW TOOLS WILL BE USEFUL
and don,t assume that the info that might be stamped on the cam is correct, as cams can be re-ground, cam lobes wear and cams are frequently installed incorrectly

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KNOWING WHAT YOUR DEALING WITH HELPS
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related info, AND LINKS TO CAM CHECKING INFO
viewtopic.php?f=52&t=90

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=133&p=163&hilit=stock+chevy+cams#p163

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=5520&p=29274&hilit=cam+degree+tools#p29274

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=1070

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=5154

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=181

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=82

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=4299

http://racingarticles.com/article_racing-69.html

http://performancetrends.com/ca20.htm

http://performancetrends.com/cam_test_stand.htm
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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