Assembly lube summary



Assembly lube summary

Postby bytor » February 8th, 2012, 11:58 am

Maybe I missed it on the forum but is there a list describing what type of assembly lube to use and where, when building an engine? While doing research on this site and reading through a few engine build books, here’s what I have been able to determine. Am I missing anything?

Crank, main/bearings, rod journal/bearings and piston pin - For pre-assembly and checking clearances use engine oil. For final assembly, use a good moly based assembly lube. Mix moly based assembly lube with a little engine oil for easer application.

Cylinder bores – Engine oil or Marvel Mystery Oil.

Pistons – Dip in engine oil or Marvel mystery oil prior to installation

Valve train including push rod ends, rockers and valve stems – Moly assembly lube

Cam bearings and thrust bearing/plate – Moly assembly lube

Timing chain – Soak in engine oil and moly assembly lube mixture prior to installation

Lifters - Follow manufacture’s install and break-in instructions

Camshaft – Follow manufacture’s install and break-in instructions
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Re: Assembly lube summary

Postby grumpyvette » February 8th, 2012, 12:31 pm

IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
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Re: Assembly lube summary

Postby grumpyvette » January 6th, 2014, 3:47 pm

http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/moly-basics/

Home Blog Default Moly Basics
Moly Basics
Molybdenum Disulfide

Molybdenum is a very hard metal with a number of industrial uses.
It is combined with chromium in steel to make the steel harder and more resistant to bending. Most of the bicycle frames produced today use chromium and molybdenum steel. Because the steel is so much harder, the manufacturers can use less, thereby making the frame lighter.

Molybdenum Disulfide (Moly) has been used for decades in lubricating pastes and greases because it is slippery and forms a protective coating on metal parts.

Moly exists as microscopic hexagonal crystal platelets Several molecules make up one of these platelets. A single molecule of Moly contains two sulfur atoms and one molybdenum atom. Moly platelets are attracted to metal surfaces. This attraction and the force of moving engine parts rubbing across one another provide the necessary thermochemical reaction necessary for Moly to form an overlapping protective coating like armor on all of your engine parts. This protective armor coating has a number of properties that are very beneficial for your engine.

Image

The Moly platelets that make up the protective layers on your engine surfaces slide across one another very easily. Instead of metal rubbing against metal, you have Moly platelets moving across one another protecting and lubricating the metal engine parts.

This coating effectively fills in the microscopic pores that cover the surface of all engine parts, making them smoother. This feature is important in providing an effective seal on the combustion chamber. By filling in the craters and pores Moly improves this seal allowing for more efficient combustion and engine performance.
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This overlapping coating of Moly also gives protection against loading (perpendicular) forces. These forces occur on the bearings, and lifters. The high pressures that occur between these moving parts tend to squeeze normal lubricants out.



Eventually, there is metal to metal contact, which damages these moving parts and creates large amounts of heat. Fortunately, this is not the case with some lubricants.The layer of moly that forms on these moving surfaces can withstand pressures of 500,000 psi, without being squeezed out.

Engineers and scientists have tried for years to use Moly in motor oils but they had been unsuccessful because they could not find a way to keep Moly in suspension. Once Moly was put into suspension it would gradually settle out. It was easy to see it come out of suspension because a black sludge would collect on the bottom of the oil containers. In engines it would settle to the bottom of the crankcase or clog oil pathways and filters.

Engineers have overcome these obstacles. They have developed a process that keeps Moly in suspension and isn’t filtered out. Since that time theproduct has undergone extensive independent testing in labs and in the field for many years to insure that the product stands up to the rigorous needs of today’s engines. With the plating action of Moly reducing friction which reduces heat, this helps keep rings free from carbon buildup, prevents blow-by, decreases emission, and extends oil life.



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MoS2 Dry Film Lubricant

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What is Molybdenum Disulfide and why is it showing a good lubricating behavior?

Molybdenum Disulfide, also known as Molybdenum Disulphide, MoS2 and Moly, is one of the most widely used solid film lubricants. Like graphite and tungsten disulfide (WS2), MoS2 is a dichalcogenide. The lubricating properties of molybdenum disulfide lubricant are due to a weak atomic interaction (Van der Waals Force) of the sulfide anions, while the covalent bond within the molybdenum is strong.
Which are the easiest and widely recognized ways of applying MoS2 coating?

There are a number of ways to apply MoS2 low friction coatings to the desired substrate. These include:

Rubbing and burnishing
Impingement with or without inorganic binder
Spraying or dipping paint like substance containing the molybdenum disulfide as a lubricant
Physical vapor deposition

Some of the specifications covering this application are; MIL-PRF-46010, AS5272, AMS2526.
Why molybdenum disulfide coating is considered unbeatable in comparison to its competitors?

In moving/mating components, friction causes considerable loss of energy, poorer performance, and limits the wear life of the components. Molybdenum Disulfide can provide a low coefficient of friction, sometimes as low as 0.05 COF. This will be dependent on the humidity, cleanliness, and sliding conditions of your application.

Also molybdenum disulfide dry lubricant can:

Operate in a wide range of temperatures up to 600 deg F and maintain its lubricity in high load, high speed conditions.
Be very effective in inhibiting corrosion as well when combined with the proper resins and binders.

Lubrication relies on the slippage along the sulfur atoms. All of the properties of the lamella structure are intrinsic and no external form of moisture is required (as it is with graphite). Mos2 performs best when water vapor is not present, making molybdenum disulphide coating ideal for vacuum applications.

http://www.microlubrol.com/krytoxgpl205 ... 2-3-1.aspx
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
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Re: Assembly lube summary

Postby Indycars » January 7th, 2014, 8:43 am


Was wondering what a Lamella Structure was about and came across this article.



Solid Lubricants / Dry Lubrication

Graphite and molybdenum disulfide (MoS2) are the predominant materials used as solid lubricant. In the form of dry powder these materials are effective lubricant additives due to their lamellar structure. The lamellas orient parallel to the surface in the direction of motion.

Lemella01.JPG


Even between highly loaded stationary surfaces the lamellar structure is able to prevent contact. In the direction of motion the lamellas easily shear over each other resulting in a low friction. Large particles best perform on relative rough surfaces at low speed, finer particle on relative smooth surface and higher speeds.

Other components that are useful solid lubricants include boron nitride, polytetrafluorethylene (PTFE), talc, calcium fluoride, cerium fluoride and tungsten disulfide.

Typical applications
Graphite
Molybdenum Disulfide
Boron Nitride
PTFE
Application Methods
Self lubricating composites

Typical applications

Solid lubricants are useful for conditions when conventional lubricants are inadequate.

reciprocating motion. A typical application is a sliding or reciprocating motion that requires lubrication to minimize wear as for example in gear and chain lubrication. Liquid lubricants will squeezed out while solid lubricants don't escape and prevent for fretting corrosion and galling.
ceramics. Another application is for cases where chemically active lubricant additives have not been found for a particular surface, such as polymers and ceramics.

high temperature. Graphite and MoS2 exhibit high temperature and oxidizing atmosphere environments, whereas liquid lubricants typically will not survive. A typical application include fasteners which are easily tightened and unscrewed after a long stay at high temperatures.

extreme contact pressures. The lamellar structure orient parallel to the sliding surface resulting in high bearing-load combined with a low shear stress. Most applications in metal forming that involve plastic deformation will utilize solid lubricants.


Graphite

Graphite is structurally composed of planes of polycyclic carbon atoms that are hexagonal in orientation. The distance of carbon atoms between planes is longer and therefore the bonding is weaker.

Lamella02.JPG


Graphite is best suited for lubrication in a regular atmosphere. Water vapor is a necessary component for graphite lubrication. The adsorption of water reduces the bonding energy between the hexagonal planes of the graphite to a lower level than the adhesion energy between a substrate and the graphite. Because water vapor is a requirement for lubrication, graphite is not effective in vacuum. In an oxidative atmosphere graphite is effective at high temperatures up to 450ºC continuously and can withstand much higher temperature peaks. The thermal conductivity of graphite is generally low ~1.3 W/mK at 40ºC.

Graphite is characterized by two main groups: natural and synthetic. Synthetic graphite is a high temperature sintered product and is characterized by its high purity of carbon (99.5-99.9%). The primary grade synthetic graphite can approach the good lubricity of quality natural graphite.

Natural graphite is derived from mining. The quality of natural graphite varies as a result of the ore quality and post mining processing of the ore. The end product is graphite with a content of carbon (high grade graphite 96-98% carbon), sulfur, SiO2 and Ash. The higher the carbon content and the degree of graphitization (high crystalline) the better the lubricity and resistance to oxidation.

For applications where only a minor lubricity is needed and a more thermally insulating coating is required, then amorphous graphite would be chosen (80% carbon).


Molybdenum Disulfide

MoS2 is a mined material found in the thin veins within granite and highly refined in order to achieve a purity suitable for lubricants. Just like graphite has MoS2 a hexagonal crystal structure with the intrinsic property of easy shear. MoS2 lubrication performance often exceeds that of graphite and is effective in vacuum as well whereas graphite does not. The temperature limitation of MoS2 at 400ºC is restricted by oxidation. The particle size and film thickness are important parameters that should be matched to the surface roughness of the substrate. Large particles may result in excessive wear by abrasion caused by impurities in the MoS2, small particles may result in accelerated oxidation.


Boron Nitride

Boron Nitride is a ceramic powder lubricant. The most interesting lubricant feature is its high temperature resistance of 1200ºC service temperature in an oxidizing atmosphere. Further Boron has a high thermal conductivity. Boron is available in two chemical structures, i.e. cubic and hexagonal where the last is the lubricating version. The cubic structure is very hard and used as an abrasive and cutting tool component.


PTFE

PTFE is widely used as an additive in lubricating oils and greases. Due to the low surface energy of PTFE, stable unflocculated dispersions of PTFE in oil or water can be produced. Contrary to the other solid lubricants discussed, PTFE does not have a layered structure. The macro molecules of PTFE slip easily along each other, similar to lamellar structures. PTFE shows one of the smallest coefficients of static and dynamic friction, down to 0.04. Operating temperatures are limited to about 260ºC.


Application methods

Spraying/dipping/brushing: Dispersion of solid lubricant as an additive in oil, water or grease is most common used. For parts that are inaccessible for lubrication after assembly a dry film lubricant can be sprayed. After the solvent evaporates, the coating cures at room temperature to form a solid lubricant. Pastes are grease like lubricants containing a high percentage of solid lubricants used for assembly and lubrication of highly loaded, slow moving parts. Black pastes generally contain MoS2. For high temperatures above 500°C pastes are composed on the basis of metal powders to protect metal parts from oxidation necessary to facilitate disassembly of threaded connections and other assemblies.

Free powders: Dry-powder tumbling is an effective application method. The bonding can be improved by priory phosphating the substrate. Use of free powders has its limitations, since adhesion of the solid particles to the substrate is usually insufficient to provide any service life in continuous applications. However, to improve running-in conditions or in metal forming processes a short duration of the improved slide conditions may suffice.

AF-coatings: Anti-friction coatings are "lubricating paints" consisting of fine particles of lubricating pigments, such as molydisulfide, PTFE or graphite, blended with a binder. After application and proper curing, these lubricants bond to the metal surface and form a dark gray solid film. Many dry film lubricants also contain special rust inhibitors which offer exceptional corrosion protection. Most long wearing films are of the bonded type but are still restricted to applications where sliding distances are not too long. AF-coatings are applied where fretting and galling is a problem (such as splines, universal joints and keyed bearings), where operating pressures exceed the load-bearing capacities of ordinary oils and greases, where smooth running in is desired (piston, camshaft), where clean operation is desired (AF-coatings will not collect dirt and debris like greases and oils), where parts may be stored for long periods of time.


Composites

Self lubricating composites: Solid lubricants as PTFE, graphite, MoS2 and some other anti friction and anti wear additives are often compounded in polymers and all kind of sintered materials. MoS2 for example is compounded in materials for sleeve bearings, elastomere O-rings, carbon brushes etc. Solid lubricants are compounded in plastics to form a "Self lubricating" or "Internally lubricated" thermoplastic composite. PTFE particles for example compounded in the plastic form a PTFE film over the mating surface resulting in a reduction of friction and wear. MoS2 compounded in Nylon reduces wear, friction and stick-slip. Furthermore it acts as a nucleating agent effecting in a very fine crystalline structure. The primary use of graphite lubricated thermoplastics is in applications operating in aqueous environments.


http://www.tribology-abc.com/abc/solidlub.htm

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Re: Assembly lube summary

Postby grumpyvette » January 7th, 2014, 9:48 am

THANKS! GREAT POST!

BTW Ive seen guys advise the use of lithium axle grease as bearing assembly lube on cams, lifters rockers and bearings occasionally, at times , this is VERY BAD ADVICE , ITS SIMPLY the wrong lubricant to be used, when guys substitute white lithium bearing grease for moly assembly lube, (white lithium bearing grease) is generally not automotive oil soluble,its a soap base grease, that clumps up like old peanut butter in the oil pan, and it quickly plugs oil passages, in lifters and, clogs filter mediums in oil filters, and can and does completely clog shrapnel screens causing oil to, fail to drain back into the oil pan sump, and it can and will clog oil pump pick-up screens
EXAMPLE
Image

ASSEMBLY LUBE USED ON CAMS AND LIFTERS ROCKERS< BEARINGS ETC. like CRANE CAM LUBE, has molybdenium disulfide in assembly lube, that helps maintain a strong heat resistant high pressure lubricating support film on sliding surfaces, BUT assembly lube is NOT INTERCHANGEABLE WITH MOLY AXLE GREASE
which has other ADDITIVES, in some cases its mixed with non-compatible lithium grease base,
you must use a moly based assembly lube thats designed to mix with automotive oil to provide a strong surface film on sliding surfaces

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lithium-based_grease


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IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
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