cam bearing install tools & install info



cam bearing install tools & install info

Postby grumpyvette » April 1st, 2009, 8:30 am

Youll need a cam bearing installation tool or your local machine shop can install the bearings for you, if your not doing this regularly, have them do it, as its cheaper and easier,on a one time install basis, but if you are doing it frequently GET a decent tool and learn how to use it, keep in mind its MANDATORY that the oil feed holes in the block align with the feed holes in the cam bearings once they are installed,but theres an oil feed groove thats machined in the block that must be lined up with the oil feed hole,from an engineering perspective the ideal location for the oil feed holes to provide the max cam journal support are indicated in the diagram posted below and most cam bearing sets come with instructions, in most cases that locates the cam bearing feed hole in the 12o,clock to -2 o,clock location with the block in its normal orientation,THIS IS WHERE THE CAM BEARING MANUFACTURERS SUGGEST YOU INSTALL THE BEARINGS FOR MAXIMUM CAM JOURNAL SUPPORT AND DURABILITY ,AS THIS LOCATION ALLOWS THE MAX OIL WEDGE SUPPORT TO BE FORMED AND MAINTAINED, AS THE ENGINE RUNS, you certainly don,t want the oil feed hole located where the max oil film support needs to be or in a location restricting flow to the bearing, but read thru the links provided, and be aware that the cam bearings are FREQUENTLY a different diam. for at least one and frequently several locations in the block so they must be located in the matched locations[/b]
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Keep in mind chevy cam bearings are NOT interchangeable to all locations in the block, read the instructions and measure the bearings and the install location

download/file.php?id=2011

http://www.rodandcustommagazine.com/tec ... g_oil.html

Rod & Custom, November 01, 2004 wrote:
By placing the bearing's oil hole at roughly the 2:00 position (anywhere between 2:00 and 3:00 is fine), oil is fed into the clearance between the cam journal and cam bearing as the cam rotates clockwise, creating an oil wedge that travels down and supports the cam much better during cam rotation. This forces a superior oil wedge under the cam, to provide oil support at the bottom (6:00) position.


with the block in its normal operational position
any oil needed will easily travel thru the passages and grooves,on the back side of the cam bearing, obviously if theres no oil groove in the rear of the bearing shell or block you have zero choice but to align the oil feed to the cam bearing oil feed holes. I would keep the bearing feed holes as previously indicated if these a oil feed groove.
many cam bearings and many blocks are grooved to provide oil flow to the bearing feed holes, direction of the feed flow to the bearing is less important than maintaining the oil wedge under the cam journal at the area of max loads


REMEMBER the pressure in any portion of an hydraulic system is equal throughout that system., your oil pump will maintain pressure and oil flow to the bearings, changing the flow direction of the oil feed passages has little effect

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If there's the groove in the block under the cam bearing, it provides the route pressurized oil takes around the bearing that feeds oil to location past that point in the oil distribution,and supplies the feed to the cam bearing, the ideal oil feed is indicated in the upper diagram, if there's no groove in the block under the bearing, your forced to line the holes in the block that feed oil up to the bearing, to the holes in the bearing, or bearing feed hole location.

any and all of the rear 4 bearing oil feed holes will work located in the 12-to-2 0.clock location
looking at the block from the front in its normal operating orientation with the oil pan down, heads on top
the front bearing , feeds back into the lifters so the diagram below may help clarify this, in fact some guys drill a third hole
and locate the bearing holes with a 10-,12,-2 o.clock hole location, the reason this is done is that if you bust a push-rod and the lifter gets thrown clear of its lifter bore (which while rare does happen) all the lifters farther fore ward in the block on that side ,of the block, drop to a lower oil pressure reading without that reverse oil feed, modification being installed,helping to maintain flow to the lifter feed oil passage,, and while its not going to be perfect it will help during the few seconds it takes you to realize the engine in trouble
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I get asked all the time if you can re-used cam bearings, well its your call but I feel its a dumb move to do so, if you have the engine out and your refurbishing it, the oil passages should be cleaned anyway,any time you have the block stripped its almost a mandatory task to replace cam bearings and clean out oil passages, any time you damage a cam bearing its best to replace it as and surface damage tends to result in lower oil pressure and less bearing support, remember theres easily 1000-2000 ft lbs of valve spring pressure on those cam bearings at all times, so if you can,once you've inspected a damaged cam bearing, Id replace that, damaged cam bearing,(S) you've put too much effort and money into doing things correctly to use a damaged cam bearing, the cost of a full set, even if you damaged new bearings during the engine assembly process ,that youll need too get, is just not that high, neither is it difficult to replace , with the engine out of a car on an engine stand,and yes it will drop your oil pressure a bit if left damaged, I don,t know how much it would reduce the pressure but for something that cheap and easy to replace I would NEVER even consider using it in that condition.


Image usual cost of about $32
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/AAF-A ... /?rtype=10
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http://www.summitracing.com/parts/CLE-S ... refilter=1
READ THRU THIS LINK

http://www.dura-bondbearing.com/Portals ... lletin.pdf

http://www.mellingdurabond.com/Portals/ ... arings.PDF

READ these four related threads

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=52

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=2187

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=64

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=3536



http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EyZm7uqEiBw

Optimum Placement Of Camshaft Bearing
Oil Feed Hole Location
The AERA Technical Committee offers the following important information on
optimum placement of camshaft bearing oil feed hole location during installation.
This information should be considered any time camshaft bearing replacement is
being done.
Maximum camshaft support will be realized by installing the cam bearing oil feed
hole to the optimum clock location. Blocks and heads using a 360° oil groove
located behind the bearing oil feed, allow one to move the clock position of the cam
bearing oil feed hole. This way you can adjust the clock position during cam
bearing installation to make sure that the optimum location for the best
hydrodynamic wedge is selected. Locating and installing the cam bearing to take
advantage of this hydrodynamic wedge will supply the maximum support for the
camshaft during engine operation. The direction of camshaft rotation and the
engine oil entry point into the bearing control the placement of the hydrodynamic
wedge.
Note: If the oil feed passage in the block or head is just a hole without a 360°
groove, the bearing oil hole must line up with the oil feed passage in the block or
head. In some instances, the bearing oil feed hole in the cam bearing also lines up
with a groove cut in the camshaft journal. In those instances, the location of the
bearing oil feed hole in the bearing is also very critical fore and aft and may not
match up 100% with the hole in the block or head.
The illustration in Figure 1 below shows the optimum engine oil feed hole location


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with the block in its normal operational position
(oil pan at the 6 0,clock location)
place the cam bearings in the blocks cam bore exactly like the picture shows
the groove on the back helps to eliminate the total loss of oil reaching the cam journals if it is indexed into the block incorrectly, but having the oil flow enter at the top 1/3rd of the rotation provides the best possible hydraulic oil film. load support
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Its generally a very poor idea to locate the oil feed hole at the bottom or 6 ),CLOCK as thats where the oil wedge needs to be the strongest and where the oil feed will be most restricted due to thousands of pounds of valve spring loads on the cam core, trying to seal off the oil feed hole, placing the bearing oil feed hole at between 12 o,clock and 2 o,clock provides the largest possible clearance and oil flow rate plus allows the full 180 degrees of the bearings lower surface to support the cam journal
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in a properly set up block a pressurized oil film supports the cam and main bearings
heres the block with the oil pan mounting surface at 12 o,clock or upside down, look at the correctly located oil feed holes in the cam bearings, notice they match the diagram, and two red arrows that show where the dual oil feed holes should be, on bearings with only one feed hole the 12 o,clock to 2 o,clock oil feed hole index is correct, the load is mostly on the cam bearings lower 180 degrees so you sure don,t want oil film strength lowered in that area, by having a oil feed hole that can act like an oil pressure release point in some conditions, you want a maximum thickness oil wedge formed under and supporting the cam journal
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be aware both the sbc and bbc engines may not have the block machined for an oil feed groove under the cam bearings in some locations
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http://www.lislecorp.com/uploads/instru ... 726DB5.pdf

http://www.kmjent.com/cart/product.php?productid=597 (good value)

http://www.dura-bondbearing.com/Portals ... lletin.pdf

http://www.pbw-india.com/theory.htm

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any time you go to install new cam bearings in an engine you first take detailed notes and a few pictures of the OLD cam bearing in the block under good lighting to note the location of the oil feed holes and and grooves, then as they are removed you number them each as its removed and measure them as on many engine they are NOT INTERCHANGEABLE between all main cap locations

http://www.amazon.com/Competition-Cams- ... B000A8MQFY
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keep in mind that I was recently quoted these prices for a cam bearing install, at about $110 a set installed it won,t take long to justify buying a decent cam bearing tool

Cam bearings $ 30.00
Cam bearing remove & install $75.00


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http://www.summitracing.com/search/?key ... tool&dds=1

http://www.summitracing.com/search/?key ... ings&dds=1

http://books.google.com/books?id=G2kUib ... q=&f=false

http://store.summitracing.com/partdetai ... toview=sku

http://store.summitracing.com/partdetai ... toview=sku

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=57bn-7Az43M

http://www.jegs.com/i/Proform/778/66794/10002/-1

http://www.rodandcustommagazine.com/tec ... index.html
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READ THESE LINKS AND THREADS[/color]

http://www.jegs.com/i/Proform/778/66820/10002/-1

viewtopic.php?f=51&t=125

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=2187&p=5890#p5890

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=2727&p=7078&hilit=magnets+screens#p7078

viewtopic.php?f=51&t=2919&hilit=cleaning+passages+lifters

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=2727&p=7078&hilit=magnets+screens#p7078

http://video.google.com/videosearch?oe= ... Q&start=40

Cam bearing tools

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http://store.summitracing.com/partdetai ... toview=sku

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http://store.summitracing.com/partdetai ... toview=sku

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http://store.summitracing.com/partdetai ... toview=sku


http://www.aptfast.com/Flyer_HowTo_Dir/ ... arings.htm

http://rodcustom.automotive.com/75500/0 ... index.html

the oil holes should be at the 12 oclock-2 o-clock with the block in the normal position and looking from the front with the block right side up,that allows the oil to form a support wedge under the cam load, on a sbc but carefully verify that the oil passages align with the oil holes in the bearings

[color=#008000]bearings are frequently numbered,#1 to #5
*1 is the front one ,The cam bearings are just slightly different in diameter, so you have to make sure you install them in the correct order.the diam. are listed in the link below if you got them mixed up, Make sure the oil holes are lined up when you put them in.12 oclock-3 o-clock with the block in the normal position and looking from the front


read thru this link below carefully

http://static.summitracing.com/global/i ... 900130.pdf

QUOTE
CNC BLOCKS N/E"

"We put our cam bearings in at 4 O'clock and we tap our front galley plugs 1/4 inch pipe and use red locktite and snug them up.

We use just a 1/4X18 pipe tap which is a standard tap and it really does not cut a deep thread is why we use the lock tite.

Be careful on the middle plug as you can put the pipe plug in to far and shut the oil off to the front main bearing and number 1 rod bearings. As I have seen that done before."


http://www.midwestmotorsportsinc.com/order_part.php?item=CH8&line=DUR

http://store.summitracing.com/partdetail.asp?part=CLE%2DSH1349S&autoview=sku

http://store.summitracing.com/partdetail.asp?part=DUR%2DCH%2D12&autoview=sku

http://store.summitracing.com/partdetail.asp?part=CLE%2DSH287S&autoview=sku

http://store.summitracing.com/partdetail.asp?part=FEM%2D1255M&autoview=sku

http://www.aptfast.com/Flyer_HowTo_Dir/ ... arings.htm

http://www.rodandcustommagazine.com/tec ... index.html

http://www.chevyhiperformance.com/tech/ ... to_03.html

http://members.shaw.ca/ritc1/bearingtool.html

cam bearings are easily swapped IF you have the correct tools but its generally cheaper to have the local machine shop replace them than to buy the correct tool unless your doing the job fairly regularly.


http://www.toolsource.com/universal-...l-p-67768.html

if you have access to a lathe you can fabricate a tool for your application for under $20 in parts a 36" section of 1/2" thread rod a couple washers and nuts and a custom turned bearing holder made on the lathe will do the job
BTW its common for the bearings to be different sizes at different locations,some are numbered, some may require the oil feed hole location to differ, etc, so measure the bearings,take note of the oil hole locations on the old cam bearing before you remove them, don,t just take one, new one randomly out of the package and start beating it into place
Ive even seen parts from these kits

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=35555

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=92387

http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/cta...emnumber=95853

used to install them

read thru this link below carefully

http://static.summitracing.com/global/i ... 900130.pdf
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DART BLOCKS HAVE A DIFFERENT OIL ROUTE
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the engine needs to come out to replace cam bearings because the rear cam tunnel freeze plug needs to be removed for tool access
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in a properly set up block a pressurized oil film supports the cam and main bearings
oil flows around the outer bearing in the groove in the back of the bearing and the matching groove in the cam journal cut in the block

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HERES A GUY THAT FEELS A FAR MORE RIGID STAND IS A BIGGER ADVANTAGE THAN HAVING IT FOLD UP SMALLER FOR EASY STORAGE
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http://www.northerntool.com/shop/tools/ ... _200305213
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IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: cam bearing install tools & install info

Postby grumpyvette » January 12th, 2010, 4:54 pm

Cam Bearing And Installation - Under Pressure

viewtopic.php?f=51&t=1479&p=9346&hilit=tool+bearings#p9346

http://www.rodandcustommagazine.com/tec ... index.html

Even if the block has been solvent-washed, be sure to wash the block thoroughly, inside and out, using hot, soapy water and soft, clean brushes (small "rifle" brushes can be used to clean oil passages). Rinse the block completely and dry it using compressed air; make sure that all oil and cooling passages are thoroughly blown dry. Immediately afterwards, coat all surfaces with light oil to prevent surface rusting.

Next, you'll need to install the crankshaft main caps, tightening all main cap bolts to specification. Since the main caps will be installed and torqued during final assembly anyway, it's best to have the main caps in place and fully tightened prior to inserting the cam bearings and cam, just in case any distortion occurs within the block due to main cap bolt clamping. Basically, tightening the main caps before messing with the cam serves to pre-stress the block closer to its final state. If any distortion is present, it's better to find out now rather than later.

Before installing cam bearings, wipe all cam bores with a fast-drying solvent to create a clean and dry bore surface. Installation of cam bearings into the block must be done carefully to avoid shaving material from the outside diameter of the bearings. This galling action can easily cause a buildup of excess material between the bearing and the block's bearing bore, which will "squeeze" the bearing, resulting in oil clearance reduction at the bearing inside diameter.

Before attempting to install the cam bearings, make sure that the leading edge of each bearing bore features a slight chamfer (25-30 degrees) to ease bearing installation. Depending on the engine, the cam bearings may be "stepped" (different size for each cam bore) or they may feature the same bore size, front to rear. If the bores are stepped, arrange the cam bearings in the order in which they are to be installed. Remember, when installing cam bearings, always work your way from the rear of the block forward.

On engine blocks that do not feature an oiling groove on the bearing bores, it is vital that each cam bearing is installed in the correct clock-position, so that the bearing's oil hole accurately aligns with the cam bore oiling hole. If the cam bore features a groove, the bearing should be installed with its oiling hole placed at the 2:00 position (when viewed from the front of the block that features clockwise rotation).

Cam Bearing And Installation - Under Pressure
Beating Those Bad Bearing Blues
February 24, 2009
By The R&C Staff
0411 RODP 01 Z BEARING

Cam Bearing Selection And InstallationThe task of replacing camshaft bearings during an engine rebuild may appear to be a no-brainer, but the more intelligent approach is to handle the job with as much planning and precision as you would when replacing main or rod bearings. If not, your engine is likely to wind up with a damaged camshaft and/or main and rod bearings in a relatively short period of time.

"Simply knocking out the old bearings and installing fresh ones with little regard to bearing selection, sizing, or alignment is a big mistake," says Jeff Schaerer, Engine Bearing Product Development manager at Clevite Engine Parts. "For example, ill-fitting cam bearings can result in too little or too much oil clearance, which can damage both the camshaft and/or main and rod bearings. If excessive cam bearing clearance exists, a severe reduction in oil pressure can result in insufficient oil delivery to the rest of the motor."

Mindful of the critical role that proper cam bearing selection, sizing, and alignment can have on engine longevity and performance, let's compare the attributes of two different types of materials commonly used in cam bearing construction. By doing so, you'll be in a better position to determine which type of cam bearings best meet your performance needs.

Bearing SelectionClevite's Schaerer explains that in previous years, the vast majority of cam bearings were manufactured with a "babbitt" lining. Babbitt is a soft, slippery material composed primarily of lead and tin. This soft material does an excellent job of being able to withstand particle contamination and less-than-ideal lubrication on initial engine startup. However, performance engines often operate at higher temperatures and feature higher valvetrain loads, which places babbitt material at a disadvantage. These operating conditions sometimes result in fatigue or deformation (extrusion) of the soft babbitt material.

In order to address higher loads and temperatures, babbitt, for the most part, has been replaced with an aluminum alloy. This specially developed alloy is much stronger than babbitt and can withstand much higher loads. The trade-off lies in the fact that aluminum alloy is harder than babbitt but is less forgiving with regard to contamination, cam bearing bore misalignment, and less-than-ideal lubrication. The benefits of aluminum cam bearings, however, far outweigh the compromises. You simply need to pay more attention to details when installing aluminum cam bearings and be certain to verify critical tolerances.

Traditional babbitt is designed to withstand approximately 1,800 psi of load. By contrast, Clevite's AL-3 material has been designed to withstand up to 5,000 psi. Schaerer says extra oil grooves are not needed with the AL-3 bearings, providing yet another benefit: the bearing affords a larger "footprint" at the cam bore wall, which more efficiently transfers heat away from the bearing. In addition to bi-metal aluminum cam bearings they've also developed tri-metal bearings that combine the strength of aluminum alloy with a babbitt overlay. The tri-metal bearings are able to withstand loads in excess of 8,000 psi.

Cam Bearing InstallationIf you're planning to work on an engine block that has been newly reconditioned, you'll definitely need to replace the camshaft bearings, as the old bearings must be removed beforehand to allow the block to be properly cleaned. The following can be used as a guide for installing cam bearings properly.

The installation process begins after you've accomplished any machining that might be needed (cylinder boring and/or honing, align-honing, deck resurfacing, cam bore alignment, etc.). Before starting, make certain that the block is totally clean. If it's not, then foreign particles trapped between the bearings and bearing bores will cause bearing deformation and reduce oil clearance.


By placing the bearing's oil hole at roughly the 2:00 position (anywhere between 2:00 and 3:00 is fine), oil is fed into the clearance between the cam journal and cam bearing as the cam rotates clockwise, creating an oil wedge that travels down and supports the cam much better during cam rotation. This forces a superior oil wedge under the cam, to provide oil support at the bottom (6:00) position.

As a case in point, earlier small-block Chevy blocks might feature only an oil-feed hole that aligns with the main cap oil passage, in which case the cam bearing's oil hole must align with the saddle's oil hole. By comparison, the '92-97 Chevy LT1/LT4 features a full-circle oil groove, which might lead you to think that exact clock position of the cam bearing oil hole is not important (since oil will feed into the space between the bearing and cam journal and will travel along this groove, eventually feeding into the bearing's hole anyway). However, even if a full-circumferential groove is present, as we mentioned earlier, it is necessary to position the cam bearing's oil hole at a specific position (at approximately the 2:00 position as viewed from the block front) in order to allow cam rotation to create a slight oil "wedge" during operation. This more efficiently creates an oil film between the cam journal and its corresponding bearing. Also, if the oil holes in a full-groove-type setup are aligned exactly (oil hole in the bore saddle and oil hole in the cam bearing), oil pressure can potentially feed-back, momentarily preventing oil from traveling around the journal, which can minimize the necessary oil wedge.

Cam Bearing And Installation - Under Pressure

When fitting aluminum cam bearings, it's important to allow sufficient bearing-to-camshaft clearance, since the harder aluminum alloy bearings won't wear in as rapidly as babbitt bearings to make their own clearance. Minimum clearance should be 0.002 inch for stock engines and 0.003-0.004 inch for high-performance engines.

Our Clevite bearing expert stresses that you should not apply oil to the block's camshaft bores or to the outer diameter of the cam bearings. The cam bearings must feature a dry installation at the block's cam bores. Schaerer also says to make sure you have the proper tools for installing the cam bearings. For example, he recommends using a dedicated cam bearing driver tool, which is available from any engine specialty tool supplier.

At this point, Schaerer says to apply a coating of lubricant to each of the cam bearing's exposed face (the inner diameter of the bearings where the cam will ride). You can use either clean engine oil or, preferably, dedicated engine assembly lube. "A quality assembly lube will cling to the bearing faces better than oil," explains Schaerer. "Granted, you'll be lubing the camshaft's journals prior to inserting the cam anyway, but it never hurts to protect the bearings while you have access to them. Think of it as a bit of added insurance, just in case you should forget to apply lube to one or more of the journals."

Ensuring Optimal Bearing FitWhen replacing cam bearings, it's a good idea to check camshaft-to-bearing fit, even if you purchased your car new, and this is the very first time you are replacing its cam bearings. Clevite's cam bearing expert explains why: "Many rebuilders and do-it-yourselfers are unaware that original equipment engine manufacturers (OEMs) may sometimes install unfinished-size cam bearings into the block, and then machine the cam bearing inside diameters in order to establish correct size, shape and alignment," says Schaerer. "In the industry, this is referred to as 'finished in place,' or FIP, cam bearing installation.

"During the rebuilding process, FIP bearings are removed and replaced with precision cam bearings that have already been manufactured to size," explains Schaerer. "While replacement cam bearings are manufactured to precise tolerances, it is still advisable to check camshaft-to-bearing fit so as to identify potential camshaft journal diameter variances among the replacement camshafts."

If cam fit is too tight, bearing material can be removed by reaming. Schaerer says that honing bearings to size is not recommended, because honing stone grit can easily be trapped in the bearing surface, and its presence there can lead to premature camshaft journal wear.

Another method of "shaving" cam bearings to accept the camshaft journals involves the use of a modified spare/old camshaft of the same application, provided that the old cam's journals are within original diameter specification. In this instance, you begin by cutting a diagonal groove across each camshaft journal, about 1/8-inch deep, then relieve the journal surface on one side of each groove, thereby creating a single cutting edge on one side of each groove.

This modified camshaft is then inserted and used as a reamer. Afterwards, you'll need to attach a used cam sprocket to the cam and carefully turn the cam by hand, in the direction of normal engine rotation, in order to cut clearance in the new bearings.

Clevite's bearing expert says there are also other variables to consider when replacing cam bearings. Casting shifts, for example, can occur in a cast-iron or cast- aluminum block as the block "seasons" during its initial use. The block can become distorted due to temperature extremes (overheating) and improper cylinder head installation where excessive or unequal cylinder head fastener tightening had occurred.
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: cam bearing install tools & install info

Postby grumpyvette » January 12th, 2010, 4:54 pm

Cam Bearing And Installation - Under Pressure

Just as a block's main bores can become out of round or misaligned (creating the need for align-boring or align-honing), the cam bores can be subjected to similar geometry changes. This is why camshaft fitment problems sometimes occur when dealing with a used block. However, with a little patience and a close attention to detail during the cam assembly, you can readily overcome such problems.

Correcting Cam Bore AlignmentIf the cam bores need to be aligned, it is possible to enlarge them to establish bore roundness and front-to-rear bore alignment. However, remember, when you enlarge the cam bores, you will also need to address the difference created by the larger bores. This is accomplished by installing oversize-o.d. cam bearings or by sleeving the larger bores to accept standard o.d. bearings.

Due to the popularity of the small-block Chevrolet engine in performance applications, Clevite offers special oversize-o.d. cam bearings that permit align-boring the block's cam bores to one size (matching the No. 1 cam bore, which is the largest cam bore in the block). These oversize-o.d. cam bearings are available in both +0.010- and +0.020-inch sizes.

Clevite's SH-1352S cam bearing kit includes five bearings that are all the same size. Blocks must be bored to 2.029-2.031 inches (0.010 inch larger than the original No. 1 cam bearing bore). The Clevite PN SH-1401S cam bearing kit includes a +0.020 inch oversize, requiring cam bores to be bored to 2.039-2.041 inches.

In addition, Clevite offers a third cam bearing option for small-block Chevrolet engines, PN SH-1528S. These are special tri-metal bearings that feature a +0.010-inch oversize o.d. for cam bores that have been enlarged to 2.029-2.031 inches. These premium tri-metal bearings, though priced higher than aluminum alloy bearings, offer a thin electroplated babbitt overlay for improved bearing surface properties in combination with the high strength of aluminum alloy.

Installing The CamshaftOnce all of the cam bearings have been installed, you're ready to tackle the job of placing the camshaft into position. If the camshaft is new, it is usually safe to assume that the shaft is straight. However, if you plan to install a used camshaft, be sure to check it for runout. Begin by resting the camshaft on its front and rear journals, on clean V-blocks. Next, place a dial indicator at the center cam journal. Preload the gauge at about 0.050 inch, then zero the gauge. Slowly rotate the camshaft a full 360 degrees, noting the runout on the indicator. "Generally speaking, if the cam shows more than 0.001 inch of runout, it should not be used, because the slightest bit of runout beyond this point will likely create a fitment problem," says Schaerer.

Remember to clean the camshaft thoroughly before installation. Cleanliness is critical, so take your time, making absolutely certain that the camshaft is clean and free of any foreign particles.

The next step is to coat the cam, using the type of camshaft assembly lube specified by the camshaft maker (this is often included in a camshaft kit). "Coat the whole stick," says Schaerer in reminding us to apply the lubricant to the entire camshaft, including the cam gear, journals, and lobes.

Now you're ready to install the camshaft. Keep in mind that it is very fragile. The camshaft must be inserted slowly, taking care to avoid dragging the lobes across the bearing faces. Any scratches or nicks can result in unwanted escape paths for oil, which will lead to insufficient oil pressure at the cam bearing locations. It's advisable to use a special camshaft installation tool to ease this task. The tool attaches to the cam nose and provides a convenient handle to help in guiding the cam into the bores while maintaining better control of the cam angle.


Cam Bearing And Installation - Under Pressure

You'll need to carefully insert the camshaft into the cam bores until fully seated, but don't push too far as you might dislodge the rear soft plug at the rear cam bore opening. Since the crank is not in the way at this stage of the installation, you'll have convenient access to the rear of the cam, which you can use to help guide the stick through the bore holes.

Once the cam is fully inserted (be sure all journals are centered on their respective bearings), rotate the camshaft by hand to check for fit. The camshaft should turn easily. A slight bit of resistance is acceptable. If you find the camshaft is difficult to turn, however, you may have one or more bearings that are too tight on the i.d. (inner diameter). In that case, carefully remove the camshaft and check each bearing for any sign of a burr at the front or rear edge.

If a burr is found, you can trim the edge burr with a deburring tool. However, Schaerer adds a word of caution, saying, "If you do this, don't get too carried away. A very slight trim is all that's needed." Afterwards, clean the area, re-insert the cam, and once again check the fit.

In any performance engine, it's always a good idea to "degree" the camshaft in order to verify the timing of valve opening and closing. For performance purposes, it may be necessary to retard or advance the camshaft timing in order to increase low-end or high-end engine performance. While we don't have room in this article to address camshaft degreeing, the steps involved in this procedure can be obtained from the camshaft maker's instruction sheets or on the cam maker's Web site.

LiftersYou should always install new lifters along with your new camshaft. This is especially important when dealing with a "flat-tappet" solid or hydraulic camshaft, since lifters rotate during operation and establish distinct wear patterns at each camshaft-lobe-contact area. If you're working with roller lifters, however, you may re-use them as long as they are in good condition and are appropriate for the specific replacement camshaft. In any case, make certain that the components you are using are compatible. Always use flat-tappet solid lifters with a flat-tappet solid lifter cam, flat-tappet hydraulic lifters with a flat-tappet hydraulic cam, and roller lifters with a roller camshaft.

Though it's not recommend, if you choose to install used flat-tappet lifters, do so only if the original flat-tappet camshaft is also being installed. In this scenario, it is vital that each lifter location matches the original installation. If you're planning to reuse the original cam and lifters, inspect them carefully to make sure they are in good condition. Remember, too, that the lifters must be mated only to the specific cam lobe to which they were mated originally.

"Flat"-tappet lobes and lifters are only "flat" to the eye. In reality, each lobe features a slight taper, approximately 0.001 inch to 0.007 inch. Each lifter also has a slight crown. This combination of a tapered lobe and domed lifter face is a design feature that causes the lifter to rotate in its bore during engine operation, enabling it to avoid concentrated scuff wear.

Regardless of the type of lifters being installed, you are advised to coat each lifter liberally with the proper type of assembly lubricant before insertion. If roller lifters are being installed, each lifter must be guided (via a lifter guide bar) in order to place the roller tip in alignment with the cam lobe, and to prevent the lifter from rotating in its bore. If a roller lifter rotates in its bore, severe lifter and camshaft damage will occur. Always check each lifter in its bore for smooth up-down movement, and also confirm that each flat-tappet lifter will rotate smoothly in its bore.

Now you're ready for the finishing touches. With lifters in place, install the pushrods and adjust the valve lash according to the engine manual or the cam maker's instructions. Avoid "over-rolling" the engine, to minimize loss of cam lubricant from lobes and lifter faces.

Camshaft "Break-in"If the camshaft and lifters feature a flat-tappet (solid or hydraulic) design, camshaft break-in is absolutely critical to camshaft longevity. It's also important to make every effort to ensure that the engine will start during the first attempt.

Once the engine has fired, keep it running and immediately bring engine speed to within 1,500-2,200 rpm, especially if a flat-tappet cam and lifter system is employed. Maintain engine speed within that range, varying up/down, for about 20 minutes. This will help to properly "seat" rings, bearings, and the camshaft/lifters. If an engine with a flat-tappet camshaft and lifters is operated below about 1,500 rpm during the initial run, there may not be sufficient oil lubrication to the cam lobe/lifter contact areas to allow the lifters to rotate.

Increased oil pressure resulting from elevated engine speed helps the lifters to rotate, rather than scuffing against the lobes in a locked (non-rotating) position. If the lifters are not lubricated properly and don't rotate during this first run, they can initiate a wear path at the lobe, which will quickly damage the cam lobe(s). "Don't kid yourself about this," says Schaerer. "If the engine is insufficiently lubricated at the lifter-to-lobe contact area, you can cause permanent damage to the lobes and lifter within a few seconds of startup, and you can destroy a flat-tappet camshaft and its lifters in less than a minute."

If the cam and lifters are of the roller design, where each lifter features a roller bearing at its camshaft lobe contact, camshaft break-in is much less demanding (some will argue that roller cam break-in is simply a non-issue). That's because instead of the lifters scuffing across the cam lobes while trying to establish a mating pattern, roller lifters "roll" across the lobes, virtually eliminating any lobe/lifter frictional mating concerns. Nonetheless, it's still wise to elevate the initial run for a few minutes, even when dealing with a roller cam setup, if only to ensure that the oil pressure is sufficient to aid in the lifter roller-tip operation.

Clevite's Schaerer offers this final bit of advice, "The golden rule that applies to starting up a fresh motor is simple: Slow down and take your time in carefully performing a complete pre-flight check. Remember, any extended period of cranking can cause oil to be wiped from critical load bearing surfaces, such as cam lobes and lifters. The goal is to achieve smooth engine startup on the first try."
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Re: cam bearing install tools & install info

Postby NYH1 » February 18th, 2010, 9:11 pm

I just ordered a cam bearing installation & removal tool from Summit yesterday. When I had the machine work (and new cam bearing installed) done on my block I was planning building a 350. I got a little extra cash so I bought a 383 Scat Rotating assembly. I did the rod/block clearance work myself, which was no big deal. Now I want to removing the cam bearings to clean the block better and make sure no metal shavings are behind the cam bearings. My machinist is very busy now, plus I want to do as much work on my block/motor as possible .

I planned on marking each one of the bearings with a black marker to note their "clock position" in the block before I remove them. Then install them to the same position after I clean everything. Does this sound correct?
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Re: cam bearing install tools & install info

Postby grumpyvette » February 18th, 2010, 10:17 pm

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THIS IS WHY OIL FEED HOLES SHOULD BE IN THE 12-2 o,clock location
thats a good idea, just be aware that they differ in diameter in some locations, so number each bearing and make notes on both the bearing location and how the oil supply holes located

http://www.autozone.com/autozone/repair ... le=replace

look thru all the linked info but study this

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http://static.summitracing.com/global/i ... 900130.pdf

read thru this link CAREFULLY

viewtopic.php?f=51&t=1479

NOTE
Some engines, such as the small block Chevrolet V-8, have a rear cam bearing bore that is wider than the bearing. Failure to correctly align the bearing oil hole, in the rear cam bearing to the blocks oil feed groove can result in a total loss of oil pressure in this engine.

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the location of the oil holes effects the OIL WEDGE and LOAD SUPPORT EFFICIENCY

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theres a GROOVE UNDER THE CAM BEARING SO IT CAN BE INSTALLED WITH THE HOLES IN ANY LOCATION,(2 0,clock is generally preferred) but some locations offer greater load support.(5 O,clock to -8 O,clock is the worst) and not all bearing will fit all locations, because they are not the same diameter, and some don,t have the same number of oil feed holes
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I looked into doing installing roller cam bearings when I built my current corvette 383 as I was sure going into the build that it would be a good idea, but once I really researched the costs of the machine work, parts and special cams etc. it rapidly became obvious that on anything used mostly for transportation or drag racing its pissing money down a rat hole compared to a dozen other options you could spend the money on. the process involves having a machine shop bore the block cam tunnel larger, for the larger roller bearings , installing them and using a larger custom made cam, between the the cost of the cam, bearings and machine work you can easily spend $600-$900 on the upgrade, now if I was racing at SEBRING or the 24 hours at daytona where the engine would be under max stress 70%-90% of the time, theres no question that the idea has SOME merit, as would the billet roller cam and larger and stiffer cam core, allowing larger cam lobes and .904 chrysler style roller lifters, which while not mandatory are a good idea on an endurance application.
the lower friction cam bearing are supposed to give you about 3-4 extra hp and reduce oil temps a couple degrees , and reduce friction but the main gains are in the larger bearing size that allows larger cam lobes and reduced lifter acceleration rates, less cam flex and a more stable valve train


"Typical steel-backed lead babbit cam bearings do an excellent job in everyday use but have a number of shortcomings in severe-duty applications. First, in many engine designs, oil is routed from the oil pump to the cam, then to the main bearings, and then to the rod bearings, in that order. In a highly stressed mill, it should be the other way around. The rotating assembly spins twice as fast as the cam and is much more heavily loaded than the cam journals.

Second, whenever radical cam profiles are used, so too are high-pressure valve springs. As they maintain order within the valve train, stiff springs also create plenty of extra friction between the lifters and cam lobes. This is transferred directly to the cam bearings where accelerated wear can result.

Finally, there is the issue of oil temperature. We all know that petroleum-based motor oil can break down if things get too hot. Eliminating much of the friction caused by the spinning cam yields a measurable decrease in oil temperature for added longevity and safety.

All three potential problems are eliminated when you switch to rollerized cam bearings. It eliminates the oil flow leakage around the cam bearings, providing full volume to the rotating assembly, and the superior construction of the roller bearings will handle up to 900 pounds of valve-open spring pressure without problems. (Numbers over 1,000 pounds can be tricky, but youÂ’ll never go there unless youÂ’re fielding a Pro Stocker.) The reduced friction can drop oil temperature by as much as 20 degrees, allowing dry sump users to carry and pump less oil.

Are rollerized cam bearings for you? If your motor lives life one quarter-mile at a time, probably not. The block machine work, cam bearing kit, and specific camshaft can cost upward of $700. You could spend the money more effectively elsewhere. But if you stay on it for miles on end, roller cam bearings are a definite engine-saver. Typical users include Bonneville racers, Silver State entrants who run WFOT for 90 miles, and Sprint Car racers who run balls-out for 30 laps. WeÂ’d be remiss if we didnÂ’t mention the end-all endurance crazies of NASCAR. Every last one of them relies on rollerized cam bearings. In this story, Gene Ohly and Jaime Gonzalez of Evans Speed show us the right way to enjoy the benefits of rollerization."
you must use a billet cam core, if not the roller bearings will chew up the softer material.
Read more: http://www.hotrod.com/techarticles/bonn ... z1tQnpcQXr

http://www.compcams.com/catalog/COMP201 ... 12_374.pdf

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/CCA-5412/

http://www.hotrod.com/techarticles/bonn ... s_install/

http://www.performanceblocks.com/CNC_En ... rsion.html

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PN 350RCB from Comp Cams. http://www.summitracing.com/parts/CCA-350RCB-KIT/

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Roller Cam Bearings For Maximum Endurance
This comparison demonstrates the superior load-bearing capacity of the needle bearings. The larger outside diameter necessitates machining the cam housings and cam tunnel. The altered inside diameter also requires a camshaft with specifically matched journals. Make sure you get in touch with a cam-grinder who can supply you with the right cam before you permanently modify your block.


CNC BLOCKS POSTED THIS
"We do a lot of cam tunnel blue print work and the babbit cam bearings seem very common among engine builders today,

Look at the LS type engines they have bigger cam journals and higher rocker ratios.

As mentioned the babbit cam bearing take away unwanted harmanics out f the vavle train and the cam is floating on a film of oil VS having oil in the needle bearings which you may have up to 50 or more needle bearings per bearing and tring to roll all those needles in oil does take more power now times 5 roller bearings

Plus the bigger cam cores don't flex or twist like the smaller journals do which is a big plus.

We machine alot of 010 block with the BBC cam tunnels for mostly flat tappet engines as we can run 1.8 and 1.9 rocker ratios with out tearing the nose of the cam off.

Going with a 60MM cam core will require special bushings that are taller so the oil band on the lifter does not come up out of the lifter hole and because the oil band is higher in the lifter bore it also requires a higher grove in the bushing as the oil band on the lifter is higher then oil feed holes.

55MM cam cores are most common with the BBC and most guys are using the babbit cam bearings P/N Durabond GMP-55-T which requires a 2.283 housing bore which takes a roller cam bearing in the same housing bore.

If you step up to the 55MM cam core I would suggest going to the .904 lifters with the bigger wheel which is like having an extra half a point of rocker ratio, You must let your cam grinder know what size wheel your using as the bigger wheel pick up on the ramp earlier and leaves later.

And the .904 uses a bigger body and bigger wheel and axel make for a much dependable lifter plus going with a bigger cam core is much easier on the lifters.

There are pretty good gains going with a bigger cam core from the feed back I have gotten from other engines builders we have done work for. "
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
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Re: cam bearing install tools & install info

Postby NYH1 » February 25th, 2010, 1:01 am

My father, my son (8) and I used the cam bearing tool tonight to remove my cam bearings. It was pretty easy. I think installing them after I clean the block will be pretty easy as well. It's installing the rear freeze plug behind the rear cam bearing that I'm worried about.

The rear freeze plug at the end of the cam tunnel is what determines how far the cam sits in the block right? How do I set the correct depth?
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Re: cam bearing install tools & install info

Postby grumpyvette » February 25th, 2010, 7:49 am

I think your making a major mistake if you don,t replace the cam bearings and flush out the block passages
new cam bearings are less than $20 in most places
example
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/DUR-CH-8/

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/SUM-173000/

you can buy or rent the tool to install them
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/SUM-900130/

remember the rear cam tunnel freeze plugs not a 2" freeze plug its something like 2 1/32"
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/DRT-3 ... 5.7L%2f350
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notice theres a SLIGHT STEP the plug seats against in most cases the rear of the plug seats even with the block surface
IVE always seated the plug edge just level with or a bit deeper than flush with the back of the blocks plug recess boss and found that works, remember to use a brush on sealant on the plug edge, and use a punch in three places to lock it in place
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viewtopic.php?f=57&t=869&p=1357&hilit=+sealant#p1357

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keep in mind the GROOVE under the cam bearing must aline with the oil feed hole in the bearing

Got Cam Bearing Problems?
After hearing about a fellow sprint car racer’s bearing troubles with two of his engines, I asked a few questions and thought I might know his problem. Upon looking at his block (GM 3970010 Chevy), I knocked the cam bearings out and found what I expected.

The oil passage drilled from the main bearing bore to the cam bearing was a 1/4˝ diameter passage like always but the passage from the main galley to the cam bearing bore was only 3/16˝ diameter. This, I believe was a contributing factor in his bearing problem.

Our shop has always checked this passage during disassembly and taken a 6˝ X 1/4˝ drill bit and drilled that passage on every Small Block Chevy, whether it was street or race application. Most early 265, 283 and 327s have the 3/16˝ diameter passage. Some 307, 327 and 350s also have the 3/16˝ diameter passage. Just make sure which diameter that oil passage is while you have the cam bearings out and if it’s the small one take that moment to take a drill and 6˝ X 1/4˝ dia. bit (as it will reach all the way through from the main bore) bit to open it up to 1/4˝.

I also check the depth of the groove that passes the oil around the cam bearing at that time. If it’s a race engine I like it to be at least .200˝ wide X .125˝ deep for adequate oiling.

Norm Johns



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IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
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Re: cam bearing install tools & install info

Postby NYH1 » February 25th, 2010, 12:34 pm

So I take it that the timing chain gear on the cam controls how far the cam go into the block?
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Re: cam bearing install tools & install info

Postby grumpyvette » February 25th, 2010, 12:47 pm

NYH1 wrote:So I take it that the timing chain gear on the cam controls how far the cam go into the block?



the depth is controlled both by the cam button,placed in the center hole of the cam gear,(either chain or gear drive) keeping the cam from moving forward and the back of the cam gear, and constant oil pressure behind the cams rear end from moving to the rear,thats one reason Ive always suggested drilling the front pass side oil passage plug with a #64 drill so extra oil is constantly sprayed on the rear of the cam gears to limit wear, between the cam timing set and the blocks front cam bearing boss.
allowing for extra oil spraying onto the timing chain assembly by drilling small holes in the forward oil passage plugs is an old engine builders mod that even the factory in some rare cases used.
its simply a reasonable way to get extra lubricant to the timing chain assembly, which because its spinning tends to throw off oil rapidly so its in constant need of more oil flow. its designed to get most of its oil in the form of a constant oil fog in the crank case,generated by the spinning rotating assembly and theres a larger upper hole in the block wall and the oil pan forward section that allows oil to slosh onto the timing chain when you hit the brakes, but unless your running right up at the full mark on the dip stick that oil sloshing tends to be limited, so adding the hole to the oil passage forward plugs tends to help.
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viewtopic.php?f=27&t=1170

a number #64 or #65 drill is about correct

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you may want to READ THESE again
viewtopic.php?f=54&t=2187

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=1793&p=4553&hilit=button+cam+cover#p4553

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=282

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=181

viewtopic.php?f=52&t=90

viewtopic.php?f=53&t=2209&p=6925#p6925

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http://www.summitracing.com/parts/CLO-9 ... /?rtype=10
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http://www.summitracing.com/parts/CCA-202/

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/CCA-200/
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http://www.summitracing.com/parts/CCA-4605/

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http://www.summitracing.com/parts/PJJ-327-1C/?rtype=10
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
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Re: cam bearing install tools & install info

Postby grumpyvette » September 20th, 2010, 11:03 am

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IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
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Re: cam bearing install tools & install info

Postby grumpyvette » September 27th, 2010, 7:24 pm

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I can see where building a custom cam bearing tool would not be overly difficult

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obviously if your mechanically inclined and have access to a lathe, building your own cam bearing installation tool to be used to draw the bearings into place using a 24" section of 1/2" thread rod is just not that difficult to do, you need a bearing holder like the diagram above, and a couple large fender washers and youll need a couple thread nuts , but its hardly a difficult concept, to use the threads to draw the bearing holder into the block to seat the bearing in the block recess, carefully read the previous linked info in this thread
the tools use is more a tweak or refinement than mandatory, but increasing cool lubricant flow to the lifter contact area can,t hurt a bit!I bought mine simply because I liked the idea, and its proved to be useful.
I usually groove my blocks lifter bores lower 1/3rd regardless of the lifter type used, but Id point out that the grooves are shallow and designed to flow extra cooling lubricant, so you'll want to also use a windage tray to control the extra coolant flow volume.
I don,t think they are as big a benefit to roller cam applications, as the flat tappet lifter applications but obviously your more or less stuck with the grooves in the lifter bores even if you change lifter types after the lifter bores grooved unless you sleeve them.

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The cam bearings are just slightly different in diameter, so you have to make sure you install them in the correct order. The smallest in back, largest in front. Make sure the oil holes are lined up when you put them in


Tips for Maximizing Cam Bearing Performance in High Performance and Stock Engines

For many years, nearly all camshaft bearings were manufactured with a lining of babbitt. Babbitt is a soft slippery material made up primarily of lead and tin and is quite similar to solder. As a bearing surface layer, babbitt possesses the desirable properties necessary to survive under adverse conditions such as foreign particle contamination, misalignment and marginal lubrication on start up.

The trend in modern engines has been toward higher operating temperatures and higher valve train loads. Babbitt is limited in its ability to survive under these conditions due to its relatively low strength. When babbitt cam bearings are installed under these demanding conditions, the lining may extrude or fatigue. Fatigue can be identified by craters in the bearing surface where sections of lining material have flaked out.

To meet the demands of higher loads and operating temperatures in modern engines as well as the requirements imposed by high performance, babbitt has been replaced by an alloy of aluminum. This aluminum alloy is much stronger than babbitt and will withstand several times the load which causes babbitt to fatigue or extrude. However, this added strength is obtained at the expense of some of the more forgiving properties of babbitt. The aluminum alloy is harder, making it somewhat less compatible with dirt, misalignment and marginal lubrication. This is typical of the compromises or trade offs that are frequently necessary when selecting a bearing material to suit the requirements of a specific application and in this case, higher loading.

Typically, whenever a higher level of loading is encountered, greater precision is required to maintain reliability. Conditions such as cleanliness, alignment, clearances, journal surface finishes and lubrication must all be controlled more closely. Following are some recommendations to help optimize performance when using aluminum alloy camshaft bearings.

Sufficient clearance is necessary in the initial installation. These stronger bearings will not wear in rapidly to make their own clearance like softer materials. Minimum clearance should be .002" for stock engines and .003" for high performance. Optimum clearance range for high performance applications is .003" to .004". Because of the stack up of tolerances on the block, shaft and bearing it is impossible to control clearance to this range in the manufacture of the bearing alone. Clearances must be measured at installation.

Honing the ID's of cam bearings to increase clearance is not recommended because hone grit may become embedded in bearing surfaces which will cause shaft wear. Bearing ID's may be reamed, but the most practical means is to adjust camshaft journal diameters by grinding. Even if not ground to provide additional clearance, camshaft bearing journals should be polished to a surface finish of 10 micro-inches Ra or better with the camshaft rotating in the same direction it will rotate in the engine.

Like clearance, alignment is also extremely important especially for high performance applications. Any block that has needed to have its main bearing bore alignment corrected due to distortion is likely to have experienced cam bearing bore distortion as well. Adequate clearance will help compensate for minor misalignment of less than .001". Special cam bearing sets with oversize outside diameters are available for Small Block Chevrolet engines to allow align boring the camshaft bearing housing bores in these engines. SH-1352S contains 5 bearings which are all the same size. Blocks must be bored to 2.030/2.031" (.010" larger than the original #1 position) in all 5 positions. Similarly, SH-1401S offers a .020 oversize (2.040/2.041" housing bore).

A third special cam bearing set also available for the small block Chevy is the SH-1528S. These are special trimetal bearings with .010" oversize OD for blocks align bored to 2.030/2.031". These premium trimetal parts are priced higher than the aluminum alloy parts but offer the added advantage of a thin electroplated babbitt overlay for improved bearing surface properties in combination with high strength.

Installation of bearings into the block must be done with care to avoid shaving metal off the backs of the bearings. This galling action may cause a build-up of metal between the bearing OD and the housing bore which will result in a reduction in clearance. To prevent galling, check housing bores for a proper 25 to 30 degree lead-in chamfer before installing cam bearings. On blocks without grooves behind the cam bearings, care must be taken to insure that oil holes line up between the bearings and block. Where the block has a groove behind the bearing, the bearing should be installed with the oil hole at the 2 o'clock position when viewed from the front for normal clockwise camshaft rotation. This will introduce oil into the clearance space outside of the loaded area and allow shaft rotation to build an oil film ahead of the load.

Clean the block and all components thoroughly. Hot water and detergent are best for cleaning blocks, crankshafts and camshafts to remove grit from honing, grinding and polishing. After cleaning, blow dry and coat with oil immediately to prevent rusting. Coat all bearing surfaces with Clevite Bearing Guard and all camshaft lobes and lifter faces with Cam Guard to provide a prelubricant to these critical surfaces. It is also recommended that engines be primed by externally driving the oil pump or pressuring the system externally through the pressure sensing port before initial start up. Engines should be operated at approximately 1500 to 2000 RPM for the first 15 minutes to insure proper lubrication during the initial stages of break in.
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
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Re: cam bearing install tools & install info

Postby grumpyvette » May 19th, 2011, 10:30 am

"GRUMPYVETTE?
I pulled my Old cam of my engine to install my new cam and timing set,

I found the Cam bearings looked worn and have some scuff marks

Can I replace the cam bearings when the motor still in the car and Do they make a tool for that?"


THIS is a good example of what happens to bearings if the oil passages are allowed to push small metallic debris, from wear like rockers,valve tips,cam and lifter wear thru the engine, use of a few small magnets, and shrapnel screens helps reduce or eliminate this

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cam bearings are only sold in complete sets.
BTW they are not all the same and not interchangeable in location or oil hole indexing in most cases
the cam bearing should all be replaced if ones worn significantly and that will generally require the block being out of the car on an engine stand, as most of the common cam bearing tools used to install the cam bearing require the rear cam tunnel freeze plug being removed for access

http://static.summitracing.com/global/images/instructions/sbc%20cam%20bearing%20position%20info.pdf

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/SUM-173000/
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heres some related info, READ THE LINKS

Id be concerned that any cam bearing damage was not limited to a single location, ID suggest inspecting them and heres an inspection tool to do it with


http://www.toolrage.com/prodview.asp?sku=SLI-PV300
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http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=50&t=1513&p=3556&hilit=tool+inspect#p3556

http://www.google.com/products/catalog? ... IMBEPMCMAA

http://www.tooltopia.com/atd-tools-8620 ... lebase_18u

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http://www.summitracing.com/parts/AAF-A ... /?rtype=10
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http://www.summitracing.com/parts/CLE-S ... refilter=1

READ THIS THREAD AND SUB LINKS, pay especial attention to the location of the oil feed hole locations and the fact that bearing locations are not interchangeable
viewtopic.php?f=51&t=1479


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I know this will sound absolutely crazy, but I purchased the tool above (in the read case) decades ago for $45, that tool now sells for $170 and while it works great,and it works on almost any engine or bearing size Ive also used a custom fabricated hand made , cam bearing tools like this one pictured below , that my dad made on a lathe for me for less than $20 and at least 4-5 other tools and they all work, so ID just get the cheap one or make your own if you have lathe access, but a 24" long section of 3/4" thread rod is a better choice than a smaller diam.
the cheap ones generally push the bearing into place once its aligned with a few hammer taps, the more expensive ones generally use a threaded rod to draw the bearing into place giving a more precise placement but with practice either style tool works, just be aware that on many engines the bearings are NOT interchangeable for all locations in the block as sizes vary


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IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
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Re: cam bearing install tools & install info

Postby LEJ ZO6 » May 22nd, 2011, 7:39 am

I still have one of the Snap-On cam bearing install tools for sale if anybody is interested in aquiring one. They are a high quality tool and work on almost any engine.

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Re: cam bearing install tools & install info

Postby grumpyvette » June 26th, 2012, 6:21 pm

the pictures of your cam install tool no longer show?
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
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Re: cam bearing install tools & install info

Postby grumpyvette » June 26th, 2012, 6:23 pm

the pictures of your cam install tool no longer show?
can you repost those?


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Cam Bearing Selection And InstallationThe task of replacing camshaft bearings during an engine rebuild may appear to be a no-brainer, but the more intelligent approach is to handle the job with as much planning and precision as you would when replacing main or rod bearings. If not, your engine is likely to wind up with a damaged camshaft and/or main and rod bearings in a relatively short period of time.

"Simply knocking out the old bearings and installing fresh ones with little regard to bearing selection, sizing, or alignment is a big mistake," says Jeff Schaerer, Engine Bearing Product Development manager at Clevite Engine Parts. "For example, ill-fitting cam bearings can result in too little or too much oil clearance, which can damage both the camshaft and/or main and rod bearings. If excessive cam bearing clearance exists, a severe reduction in oil pressure can result in insufficient oil delivery to the rest of the motor."

Mindful of the critical role that proper cam bearing selection, sizing, and alignment can have on engine longevity and performance, let's compare the attributes of two different types of materials commonly used in cam bearing construction. By doing so, you'll be in a better position to determine which type of cam bearings best meet your performance needs.

Bearing SelectionClevite's Schaerer explains that in previous years, the vast majority of cam bearings were manufactured with a "babbitt" lining. Babbitt is a soft, slippery material composed primarily of lead and tin. This soft material does an excellent job of being able to withstand particle contamination and less-than-ideal lubrication on initial engine startup. However, performance engines often operate at higher temperatures and feature higher valvetrain loads, which places babbitt material at a disadvantage. These operating conditions sometimes result in fatigue or deformation (extrusion) of the soft babbitt material.

In order to address higher loads and temperatures, babbitt, for the most part, has been replaced with an aluminum alloy. This specially developed alloy is much stronger than babbitt and can withstand much higher loads. The trade-off lies in the fact that aluminum alloy is harder than babbitt but is less forgiving with regard to contamination, cam bearing bore misalignment, and less-than-ideal lubrication. The benefits of aluminum cam bearings, however, far outweigh the compromises. You simply need to pay more attention to details when installing aluminum cam bearings and be certain to verify critical tolerances.

Traditional babbitt is designed to withstand approximately 1,800 psi of load. By contrast, Clevite's AL-3 material has been designed to withstand up to 5,000 psi. Schaerer says extra oil grooves are not needed with the AL-3 bearings, providing yet another benefit: the bearing affords a larger "footprint" at the cam bore wall, which more efficiently transfers heat away from the bearing. In addition to bi-metal aluminum cam bearings they've also developed tri-metal bearings that combine the strength of aluminum alloy with a babbitt overlay. The tri-metal bearings are able to withstand loads in excess of 8,000 psi.

Cam Bearing InstallationIf you're planning to work on an engine block that has been newly reconditioned, you'll definitely need to replace the camshaft bearings, as the old bearings must be removed beforehand to allow the block to be properly cleaned. The following can be used as a guide for installing cam bearings properly.

The installation process begins after you've accomplished any machining that might be needed (cylinder boring and/or honing, align-honing, deck resurfacing, cam bore alignment, etc.). Before starting, make certain that the block is totally clean. If it's not, then foreign particles trapped between the bearings and bearing bores will cause bearing deformation and reduce oil clearance.

Even if the block has been solvent-washed, be sure to wash the block thoroughly, inside and out, using hot, soapy water and soft, clean brushes (small "rifle" brushes can be used to clean oil passages). Rinse the block completely and dry it using compressed air; make sure that all oil and cooling passages are thoroughly blown dry. Immediately afterwards, coat all surfaces with light oil to prevent surface rusting.

Next, you'll need to install the crankshaft main caps, tightening all main cap bolts to specification. Since the main caps will be installed and torqued during final assembly anyway, it's best to have the main caps in place and fully tightened prior to inserting the cam bearings and cam, just in case any distortion occurs within the block due to main cap bolt clamping. Basically, tightening the main caps before messing with the cam serves to pre-stress the block closer to its final state. If any distortion is present, it's better to find out now rather than later.

Before installing cam bearings, wipe all cam bores with a fast-drying solvent to create a clean and dry bore surface. Installation of cam bearings into the block must be done carefully to avoid shaving material from the outside diameter of the bearings. This galling action can easily cause a buildup of excess material between the bearing and the block's bearing bore, which will "squeeze" the bearing, resulting in oil clearance reduction at the bearing inside diameter.

Before attempting to install the cam bearings, make sure that the leading edge of each bearing bore features a slight chamfer (25-30 degrees) to ease bearing installation. Depending on the engine, the cam bearings may be "stepped" (different size for each cam bore) or they may feature the same bore size, front to rear. If the bores are stepped, arrange the cam bearings in the order in which they are to be installed. Remember, when installing cam bearings, always work your way from the rear of the block forward.

On engine blocks that do not feature an oiling groove on the bearing bores, it is vital that each cam bearing is installed in the correct clock-position, so that the bearing's oil hole accurately aligns with the cam bore oiling hole. If the cam bore features a groove, the bearing should be installed with its oiling hole placed at the 2:00 position (when viewed from the front of the block that features clockwise rotation).

By placing the bearing's oil hole at roughly the 2:00 position (anywhere between 2:00 and 3:00 is fine), oil is fed into the clearance between the cam journal and cam bearing as the cam rotates clockwise, creating an oil wedge that travels down and supports the cam much better during cam rotation. This forces a superior oil wedge under the cam, to provide oil support at the bottom (6:00) position.

As a case in point, earlier small-block Chevy blocks might feature only an oil-feed hole that aligns with the main cap oil passage, in which case the cam bearing's oil hole must align with the saddle's oil hole. By comparison, the '92-97 Chevy LT1/LT4 features a full-circle oil groove, which might lead you to think that exact clock position of the cam bearing oil hole is not important (since oil will feed into the space between the bearing and cam journal and will travel along this groove, eventually feeding into the bearing's hole anyway). However, even if a full-circumferential groove is present, as we mentioned earlier, it is necessary to position the cam bearing's oil hole at a specific position (at approximately the 2:00 position as viewed from the block front) in order to allow cam rotation to create a slight oil "wedge" during operation. This more efficiently creates an oil film between the cam journal and its corresponding bearing. Also, if the oil holes in a full-groove-type setup are aligned exactly (oil hole in the bore saddle and oil hole in the cam bearing), oil pressure can potentially feed-back, momentarily preventing oil from traveling around the journal, which can minimize the necessary oil wedge.

When fitting aluminum cam bearings, it's important to allow sufficient bearing-to-camshaft clearance, since the harder aluminum alloy bearings won't wear in as rapidly as babbitt bearings to make their own clearance. Minimum clearance should be 0.002 inch for stock engines and 0.003-0.004 inch for high-performance engines.

Our Clevite bearing expert stresses that you should not apply oil to the block's camshaft bores or to the outer diameter of the cam bearings. The cam bearings must feature a dry installation at the block's cam bores. Schaerer also says to make sure you have the proper tools for installing the cam bearings. For example, he recommends using a dedicated cam bearing driver tool, which is available from any engine specialty tool supplier.

At this point, Schaerer says to apply a coating of lubricant to each of the cam bearing's exposed face (the inner diameter of the bearings where the cam will ride). You can use either clean engine oil or, preferably, dedicated engine assembly lube. "A quality assembly lube will cling to the bearing faces better than oil," explains Schaerer. "Granted, you'll be lubing the camshaft's journals prior to inserting the cam anyway, but it never hurts to protect the bearings while you have access to them. Think of it as a bit of added insurance, just in case you should forget to apply lube to one or more of the journals."

Ensuring Optimal Bearing FitWhen replacing cam bearings, it's a good idea to check camshaft-to-bearing fit, even if you purchased your car new, and this is the very first time you are replacing its cam bearings. Clevite's cam bearing expert explains why: "Many rebuilders and do-it-yourselfers are unaware that original equipment engine manufacturers (OEMs) may sometimes install unfinished-size cam bearings into the block, and then machine the cam bearing inside diameters in order to establish correct size, shape and alignment," says Schaerer. "In the industry, this is referred to as 'finished in place,' or FIP, cam bearing installation.

"During the rebuilding process, FIP bearings are removed and replaced with precision cam bearings that have already been manufactured to size," explains Schaerer. "While replacement cam bearings are manufactured to precise tolerances, it is still advisable to check camshaft-to-bearing fit so as to identify potential camshaft journal diameter variances among the replacement camshafts."

If cam fit is too tight, bearing material can be removed by reaming. Schaerer says that honing bearings to size is not recommended, because honing stone grit can easily be trapped in the bearing surface, and its presence there can lead to premature camshaft journal wear.

Another method of "shaving" cam bearings to accept the camshaft journals involves the use of a modified spare/old camshaft of the same application, provided that the old cam's journals are within original diameter specification. In this instance, you begin by cutting a diagonal groove across each camshaft journal, about 1/8-inch deep, then relieve the journal surface on one side of each groove, thereby creating a single cutting edge on one side of each groove.

This modified camshaft is then inserted and used as a reamer. Afterwards, you'll need to attach a used cam sprocket to the cam and carefully turn the cam by hand, in the direction of normal engine rotation, in order to cut clearance in the new bearings.

Clevite's bearing expert says there are also other variables to consider when replacing cam bearings. Casting shifts, for example, can occur in a cast-iron or cast- aluminum block as the block "seasons" during its initial use. The block can become distorted due to temperature extremes (overheating) and improper cylinder head installation where excessive or unequal cylinder head fastener tightening had occurred.

Just as a block's main bores can become out of round or misaligned (creating the need for align-boring or align-honing), the cam bores can be subjected to similar geometry changes. This is why camshaft fitment problems sometimes occur when dealing with a used block. However, with a little patience and a close attention to detail during the cam assembly, you can readily overcome such problems.

Correcting Cam Bore AlignmentIf the cam bores need to be aligned, it is possible to enlarge them to establish bore roundness and front-to-rear bore alignment. However, remember, when you enlarge the cam bores, you will also need to address the difference created by the larger bores. This is accomplished by installing oversize-o.d. cam bearings or by sleeving the larger bores to accept standard o.d. bearings.

Due to the popularity of the small-block Chevrolet engine in performance applications, Clevite offers special oversize-o.d. cam bearings that permit align-boring the block's cam bores to one size (matching the No. 1 cam bore, which is the largest cam bore in the block). These oversize-o.d. cam bearings are available in both +0.010- and +0.020-inch sizes.

Clevite's SH-1352S cam bearing kit includes five bearings that are all the same size. Blocks must be bored to 2.029-2.031 inches (0.010 inch larger than the original No. 1 cam bearing bore). The Clevite PN SH-1401S cam bearing kit includes a +0.020 inch oversize, requiring cam bores to be bored to 2.039-2.041 inches.

In addition, Clevite offers a third cam bearing option for small-block Chevrolet engines, PN SH-1528S. These are special tri-metal bearings that feature a +0.010-inch oversize o.d. for cam bores that have been enlarged to 2.029-2.031 inches. These premium tri-metal bearings, though priced higher than aluminum alloy bearings, offer a thin electroplated babbitt overlay for improved bearing surface properties in combination with the high strength of aluminum alloy.

Installing The CamshaftOnce all of the cam bearings have been installed, you're ready to tackle the job of placing the camshaft into position. If the camshaft is new, it is usually safe to assume that the shaft is straight. However, if you plan to install a used camshaft, be sure to check it for runout. Begin by resting the camshaft on its front and rear journals, on clean V-blocks. Next, place a dial indicator at the center cam journal. Preload the gauge at about 0.050 inch, then zero the gauge. Slowly rotate the camshaft a full 360 degrees, noting the runout on the indicator. "Generally speaking, if the cam shows more than 0.001 inch of runout, it should not be used, because the slightest bit of runout beyond this point will likely create a fitment problem," says Schaerer.

Remember to clean the camshaft thoroughly before installation. Cleanliness is critical, so take your time, making absolutely certain that the camshaft is clean and free of any foreign particles.

The next step is to coat the cam, using the type of camshaft assembly lube specified by the camshaft maker (this is often included in a camshaft kit). "Coat the whole stick," says Schaerer in reminding us to apply the lubricant to the entire camshaft, including the cam gear, journals, and lobes.

Now you're ready to install the camshaft. Keep in mind that it is very fragile. The camshaft must be inserted slowly, taking care to avoid dragging the lobes across the bearing faces. Any scratches or nicks can result in unwanted escape paths for oil, which will lead to insufficient oil pressure at the cam bearing locations. It's advisable to use a special camshaft installation tool to ease this task. The tool attaches to the cam nose and provides a convenient handle to help in guiding the cam into the bores while maintaining better control of the cam angle.

You'll need to carefully insert the camshaft into the cam bores until fully seated, but don't push too far as you might dislodge the rear soft plug at the rear cam bore opening. Since the crank is not in the way at this stage of the installation, you'll have convenient access to the rear of the cam, which you can use to help guide the stick through the bore holes.

Once the cam is fully inserted (be sure all journals are centered on their respective bearings), rotate the camshaft by hand to check for fit. The camshaft should turn easily. A slight bit of resistance is acceptable. If you find the camshaft is difficult to turn, however, you may have one or more bearings that are too tight on the i.d. (inner diameter). In that case, carefully remove the camshaft and check each bearing for any sign of a burr at the front or rear edge.

If a burr is found, you can trim the edge burr with a deburring tool. However, Schaerer adds a word of caution, saying, "If you do this, don't get too carried away. A very slight trim is all that's needed." Afterwards, clean the area, re-insert the cam, and once again check the fit.

In any performance engine, it's always a good idea to "degree" the camshaft in order to verify the timing of valve opening and closing. For performance purposes, it may be necessary to retard or advance the camshaft timing in order to increase low-end or high-end engine performance. While we don't have room in this article to address camshaft degreeing, the steps involved in this procedure can be obtained from the camshaft maker's instruction sheets or on the cam maker's Web site.

LiftersYou should always install new lifters along with your new camshaft. This is especially important when dealing with a "flat-tappet" solid or hydraulic camshaft, since lifters rotate during operation and establish distinct wear patterns at each camshaft-lobe-contact area. If you're working with roller lifters, however, you may re-use them as long as they are in good condition and are appropriate for the specific replacement camshaft. In any case, make certain that the components you are using are compatible. Always use flat-tappet solid lifters with a flat-tappet solid lifter cam, flat-tappet hydraulic lifters with a flat-tappet hydraulic cam, and roller lifters with a roller camshaft.

Though it's not recommend, if you choose to install used flat-tappet lifters, do so only if the original flat-tappet camshaft is also being installed. In this scenario, it is vital that each lifter location matches the original installation. If you're planning to reuse the original cam and lifters, inspect them carefully to make sure they are in good condition. Remember, too, that the lifters must be mated only to the specific cam lobe to which they were mated originally.

"Flat"-tappet lobes and lifters are only "flat" to the eye. In reality, each lobe features a slight taper, approximately 0.001 inch to 0.007 inch. Each lifter also has a slight crown. This combination of a tapered lobe and domed lifter face is a design feature that causes the lifter to rotate in its bore during engine operation, enabling it to avoid concentrated scuff wear.

Regardless of the type of lifters being installed, you are advised to coat each lifter liberally with the proper type of assembly lubricant before insertion. If roller lifters are being installed, each lifter must be guided (via a lifter guide bar) in order to place the roller tip in alignment with the cam lobe, and to prevent the lifter from rotating in its bore. If a roller lifter rotates in its bore, severe lifter and camshaft damage will occur. Always check each lifter in its bore for smooth up-down movement, and also confirm that each flat-tappet lifter will rotate smoothly in its bore.

Now you're ready for the finishing touches. With lifters in place, install the pushrods and adjust the valve lash according to the engine manual or the cam maker's instructions. Avoid "over-rolling" the engine, to minimize loss of cam lubricant from lobes and lifter faces.

Camshaft "Break-in"If the camshaft and lifters feature a flat-tappet (solid or hydraulic) design, camshaft break-in is absolutely critical to camshaft longevity. It's also important to make every effort to ensure that the engine will start during the first attempt.

Once the engine has fired, keep it running and immediately bring engine speed to within 1,500-2,200 rpm, especially if a flat-tappet cam and lifter system is employed. Maintain engine speed within that range, varying up/down, for about 20 minutes. This will help to properly "seat" rings, bearings, and the camshaft/lifters. If an engine with a flat-tappet camshaft and lifters is operated below about 1,500 rpm during the initial run, there may not be sufficient oil lubrication to the cam lobe/lifter contact areas to allow the lifters to rotate.

Increased oil pressure resulting from elevated engine speed helps the lifters to rotate, rather than scuffing against the lobes in a locked (non-rotating) position. If the lifters are not lubricated properly and don't rotate during this first run, they can initiate a wear path at the lobe, which will quickly damage the cam lobe(s). "Don't kid yourself about this," says Schaerer. "If the engine is insufficiently lubricated at the lifter-to-lobe contact area, you can cause permanent damage to the lobes and lifter within a few seconds of startup, and you can destroy a flat-tappet camshaft and its lifters in less than a minute."

If the cam and lifters are of the roller design, where each lifter features a roller bearing at its camshaft lobe contact, camshaft break-in is much less demanding (some will argue that roller cam break-in is simply a non-issue). That's because instead of the lifters scuffing across the cam lobes while trying to establish a mating pattern, roller lifters "roll" across the lobes, virtually eliminating any lobe/lifter frictional mating concerns. Nonetheless, it's still wise to elevate the initial run for a few minutes, even when dealing with a roller cam setup, if only to ensure that the oil pressure is sufficient to aid in the lifter roller-tip operation.

Clevite's Schaerer offers this final bit of advice, "The golden rule that applies to starting up a fresh motor is simple: Slow down and take your time in carefully performing a complete pre-flight check. Remember, any extended period of cranking can cause oil to be wiped from critical load bearing surfaces, such as cam lobes and lifters. The goal is to achieve smooth engine startup on the first try."
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
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Re: cam bearing install tools & install info

Postby elisalvador » August 12th, 2013, 8:15 am

ok ,, after reading the post. i have a 350 i removed the cam bearings, the #1 and #5 bearings were located at the 12 o clok position , #2,3,4, were located on the 6 o clock position , the cam, bearing bores do have a 360 groove on it , so does this mean that i can place the #2,3,4 cam bearings in the 2 o clock position ??? the cam bearings im using are speed pro bearings, and the bearings them selfs do not have a groove behind them,,, just the actual bearing bore has the 360 grooove ,,, thanks
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