engine oil temps.



engine oil temps.

Postby grumpyvette » October 1st, 2008, 1:25 pm

having the oil temp cycle between about 190F-215F is about ideal,for street driving, but anything under 245 F on the high temp side is nothing to worry about, under high performance conditions as long as your using a quality oil (SYNTHETICS DO TEND TO BREAK DOWN OVER TIME BUT AT A SLOWER RATE) and you should change it and the filter out at at least every 4500-5500 miles, with the standard oils ,now the synthetic oils usually fine for about double that mileage if you swap to a new filter every 3000miles or so, but crud does accumulate, and oil does break down, so generally pushing over about 7000-12000 miles even with oil filter changes is a bad idea

I know many of you gentlemen would rather, jump out a 12 floor window than read linked info, so short answer
any quality oil that will maintain 20 psi at idle rpms while the engines oil temp remains in the 180F-210F range will normally be fine as thats the most effective lubrication range, but OIL MUST OCCASIONALLY reach 215F to burn off acids & moisture
temps above about 245F tend to break down most oil over time, synthetics can usually handle temps in the 245F-270F range far longer than mineral base oils, but ALL oil tends to break down and get fouled with acids,ash,and bits of crud over time and so it must be filtered and changed regularly.
ADDING AN auxiliary oil cooler and a high capacity baffled oil pan or a deeper ribbed aluminum transmission pan and transmission fluid cooler with its own electric fan will not only help reduce engine and transmission temps it also tends to reduce the thermal loads on the current radiator, normally reducing over all engine temps slightly or in some cases very noticeably
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MORE INFO IN LINK

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=296
oil needs to reach and exceed 215F to prevent moisture from forming acids from the exhaust gases and particulates trapped in the oil.
coolant temps in the 190F-220F range are perfectly normal.
adding a separate powered fan version trans cooler generally drops the engine temp noticeably simply because the hot trans fluid tends to raise the coolant temp running thru the block significantly

http://www.digitalcorvettes.com/forums/showthread.php?t=81691&highlight=cooler

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=1396&p=3221&hilit=+switch#p3221

http://www.gi.alaska.edu/ScienceForum/ASF7/747.html

http://www.volvoclub.org.uk/engine_oil_history.shtml

http://www.upmpg.com/lubricationnews/wh ... index.html

Image


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http://temp.corvetteforum.net/c4/vader86/160.html

http://www.ifitjams.com/radiator.htm

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=8463&p=29691&hilit=piston+squirters#p29691

swap to a 10w30 or 10w40 synthetic if you have not yet done so,adding a 7-8 qt baffled oil pan will help (BIG TIME), keep in mind most synthetics handle temps up to about 270f -280f quite easily while some mineral base oils tend to slowly degrade at constant temps over about 245f and Id suggest getting a decent oil cooler installed before you damage the cars drive train, adding a high volume oil pump and brazing the oil pump pick-up so its a minimum of 3/8"-1/2" from the oil pan floor is a good idea, and CHECK your ignition timing MILD detonation raises engine temps.you might as well get a dual trans and oil cooler, trans fluid temps over about 190F tend to effect transmission life.
BTW HERES AN IMPORTANT TIP, IT is really common for guys to use lines to oil coolers that are far to small, that restrict flow oil flow or select a transmission or oil cooler that has to small of internal passages, shop carefully you want a MINIMUM of 1/2, or AN8 line size and 5/8" or AN10 is BETTER


http://www.kevko.net/wetsump_chevy.htm

http://www.digitalcorvettes.com/forums/showthread.php?t=85963

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Lubricant

http://www.stefs.com/products.html

http://www.moroso.com/catalog/categorybrowse.asp?CatCode=11000

http://www.milodon.com/oil-pans/oil-pans-from-milodon.asp

Image OIL COOLER
Perma-Cool 12318 $195.95

http://store.summitracing.com/partdetail.asp?autofilter=1&part=PRM%2D12318&N=700+115&autoview=sku

Perma-Cool 13311 $169.95

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OIL AND TRANS FLUID COOLER

btw if you want to run nitrous this would be a good idea

http://www.kb-silvolite.com/article.php ... ad&A_id=64


keeping the engine oil cool, basically comes down to having the oil flow thru both the engine and the cooler but having the surface area of the cooler large enough and the number of passes thru the cooler long enough to ,allow the oil to transfer most of the heats its absorbed in the engine back out into the air flowing thru the cooler,before its routed back to the engine,and that generally requires ducting cool air into the cooler and placing it where the flows not restricted, on my corvette I removed the rear spare tire, and built a mount that allowed a good deal of clearance and no significant engine heat, with it working all the time I had problems getting the heat over 220 f and it mostly stayed at or near 200f, theres basically about 3 qts in the upper engine and oil passages at any time , absorbing heat so having a similar volume in the cooler, releasing heat during the same time makes sense,and having a similar amount in the baffled oil pan sump and filter sure helps, naturally if you have the oil routed to spend more time with the majority of the oil being heated and less of the oils times spent cooling average temperatures rise rapidly
BTW one frequently overlooked factor, in cooling your engine or adding an additional oil cooler, is your alternator size,in amps and wiring the alternator correctly, if your running a 70amp-100 amp stock alternator and using electric fans to cool the engine,its not going to provide the power required to spin the fans nearly fast enough to cool the engine like a better 200 amp alternator can

first suggestion is to get a second temp gauge and check the temperature reading is really is as indicated, if it is swap to a decent synthetic oil in the 10w30 range or at least the thinnest viscosity that maintains 20 psi at hot idle temps, as SYNTHETICS don,t generally start breaking down until about 280F PLUS while mineral base oils tend to start degrading after repeated 250F use, and the thinner the oil the faster it circulates thru the clearances, and the faster heats absorbed and transferred out off the hotter components
and Id need to know more about the complete engine parts list, clearances, etc. but Id sure want to verify the fuel/air ratio is at about 12.6:1 not alot leaner and your ignition timing was carefully checked to not be a couple degrees advanced from ideal., and that your running a 7-8 quart oil pan, heres the oil cooler I use and I had to install a thermal switch or it OVER COOLED my engine oil in FLORIDA where average outside air temps closer to 90F,

my oil pan looks similar to this
http://canton.carshopinc.com/product_in ... 88bb985ecf
Canton Oil Pans
11-120 and 11-120T Oil Pans
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but I extended the sump forward with 14 ga steel and a tig welder to add 4 inches extra to the sump to get 10 qt capacity

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/PRM-1 ... mage=large


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But I was always under the impression that Chevys liked thicker mineral oils, and I should avoid synthetics? Not true then?

NOT TRUE, TRY THE THINNER SYNTHETIC OIL, as LONG AS YOU HAVE A MINIMUM of 20 PSI at hot idle your fine!
IVE run a MIX of 90%/ synthetic 10% mineral oil in my race cars for many years

usually 1 qt MARVEL MYSTERY OIL, 9 qts MOBILE 1 10w30 synthetic

http://www.marvelmysteryoil.com/

https://www.mobiloil.com/USA-English/Mo ... /Oils.aspx
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: engine oil temps.

Postby grumpyvette » October 9th, 2008, 1:58 pm

IF your oil temps tend to stay over about 215-230F all the time it looks like time for an oil cooler install, especially if the oil temps regularly hit over 245F
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heres a old post with bits of info

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=615

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coolant temps should IDEALLY be kept in the 190F-220F range,only occasional OVER 230F coolant temps make me worry, OIL TEMP in the 215F-240F range for both the best power and the best lubrication, SYNTHETIC OIL DOES HAVE A WIDER AND HIGHER TEMP RANGE, if you use SYNTHETIC OIL, occasional peak temps up to 260F are nothing to worry about, AIR TEMP entering the engine, should be routed from outside the engine compartment directly to the carb and fuel temp should be as low as you can manage
oil (especially synthetic)has improved dramatically over the last 15-20 years and thinner oil tends to BOTH absorb and carry away heat from the bearing surfaces quicker due to the faster movement thru those clearances, and those more modern formulas of thinner oils do protect your engine far better than the older oils did. keep in mind PRESSURE is a measure of the OILS RESISTANCE to being forced under pressure thru your engines clearances, and thinner oil reduces the resistance to both flow thru those clearances and pumping losses the moving parts have sliding over the oil films surface, remember the oil molecules are very small, and theres hundreds of layers stacked in that thousandth or so of bearing clearance.
a quick way to get an idea on your clearances is to look at your oil pressure AFTER the engine reaches the proper operating temps which should be about(between 215F and 240F...... OIL TEMP NOT COOLANT TEMP)
and use the thinnest QUALITY oil that maintains about a 20 psi at idle (700-900 rpm)
! keep in mind you want the OIL temp to reach a MINIMUM of 215F to burn off moisture, and that OIL FLOW does MUCH of the critical cooling in the ENGINE, so if your running hot, a larger baffled oil pan, with its far greater surface area and oil voluum can also aid in the total cooling process, just swapping from a stock 5 qt to a aftermarket 8 qt pan is usually worth about a 10-15 degree drop in engine temps
the oil temp is more critical than the coolant temp(with-in limits of course) but don,t allow the oil temp to fail to reach and stay in the 215F-240F range once the engines up to operating temp. or it can,t do its clean/lub job correctly
coolant temps in the 180f-210f range are about ideal according to G.M. test for HP and LONG ENGINE LIFE

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http://www.vtr.org/maintain/oil-overview.html

Oil weight, or viscosity, refers to how thick or thin the oil is. The temperature requirements set for oil by the Society of Automotive Engineers (SAE) is 0 degrees F (low) and 210 degrees F (high).

Oils meeting the SAE's low temperature requirements have a "W" after the viscosity rating (example: 10W), and oils that meet the high ratings have no letter (example SAE 30). An oil is rated for viscosity by heating it to a specified temperature, and then allowing it to flow out of a specifically sized hole. Its viscosity rating is determined by the length of time it takes to flow out of the hole. If it flows quickly, it gets a low rating. If it flows slowly, it gets a high rating.

Engines need oil that is thin enough for cold starts, and thick enough when the engine is hot. Since oil gets thinner when heated, and thicker when cooled, most of us use what are called multi-grade, or multi-viscosity oils. These oils meet SAE specifications for the low temperature requirements of a light oil and the high temperature requirements of a heavy oil. You will hear them referred to as multi-viscosity, all-season and all-weather oils. An example is a 10W-30 which is commonly found in stores. When choosing oil, always follow the manufacturer's recommendation.

WHAT VISCOSITY GRADE SHOULD I USE ? WILL A HIGH VISCOSITY GRADE (20W-50) PROVIDE BETTER PROTECTION ?

A. Mobil recommends that you follow your engine manufacturer's recommendations as indicated in the owner's manual. For maximum wear protection and maximum fuel economy, use the lightest oil viscosity that is recommended by the engine manufacturer for the temperature range expected. Heavier oils can lower fuel economy and rob horsepower. For normal driving conditions, 5W-30 and 10W-30 are the primary current recommendations of automotive manufacturers.


BTW
http://minimopar.knizefamily.net/oilfilterstudy.html

if your running a auto trans its important to keep that fluid UNDER 180F for long trans life


a trans fluid cooler helps immensely (I was forced to mount mine where the spare usually goes)
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on a CORVETTE using the TCI cast aluminum deep pan with the ribs ,it will lower the temp simply because it places the bottom 1.5" into the air flow under the corvette, rather than tucked up into the area behind the cross frame in the trans tunnel, BTW MY CORVETTES already have a trans fluid cooler factory installed,and I installed a larger one with its own electric fan also, and the pan still helped both slow the heat rise rate and lowered the max temp it reaches, in fact I have a hard time exceeding 180f now
and yeah your application may be different, Im only running about 430 rear wheel hp off nitrous
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heres an older, related post on oil pressure

first ID point out that the PRESSURE results from the RESISTANCE to the FLOW of oil thru the engines clearances ,....... and the oils viscosity and tempeture ,has a great deal to do with the results youll see .... it should ideally be about 20-25 PSI at IDLE, but if its at least 15 PSI at 215F its fine,IT MUST be MEASURED with the engine up to operating temp. which means the oil has reached at LEAST 215F.(if its to high reduce the oils viscosity as thats a sure way to get the oil presure to drop and get more oil flowing over the clearances faster on start up! YOU DON,T NEED THICK OIL,I.E. 20w 50 or similar viscosity in a modern engine, SNTHETIC oil quality has improved a significant amount from the oil used even 10 years ago and its totally differant fron the mineral oil gunk we used in the 1970s.

now IM well aware this old post, reposted below,.... below has to do with the earlier corvette gen 1 engines but a good deal of the info,fits the newer engines



read this over carefully
IVE POSTED MOST OF THIS BEFORE BUT IT FITS HERE AS A SOURCE OF INFO FOR THE NEWER GUYS
http://www.melling.com/highvol.html
http://www.melling.com/engoil.html

ok lets look at a few things, pressure is the result of a resistance to flow , no matter how much oil is put out by the oil pump there is almost no pressure unless there is a resistance to that oil flow and the main resistance is from oil trying to flow through the bearing surface clearances and once the pumps output pressure exceeds the engines ability to accept the oil flow at the max pressure the oil return system/bypass spring allows the oil circles back through the pump ,now the amount of oil flow necessary to reach the furthest parts in the engine from the oil pump does not go up in direct relation to rpm, but it instead increases with rpm at a steadily increasing rate that increases faster than the engine rpm due to centrifugal force draining the oil from the rods as they swing faster and faster since energy increases with the square of the velocity the rate of oil use goes up quite a bit faster due to the greatly increased (G-FORCES) pulling oil from the rod bearings over 5000rpm going to 8000rpm than the rate of oil flow increases from 2000 rpm to 5000rpm (the same 3000rpm spread) and remember the often stated (10 lbs per 1000rpm)needs to be measured at the furthest rod and main bearing from the pump not at the pump itself, next lets look at the oil flow itself, you have about 5-6 quarts in an average small block now the valve covers never get and hold more than about 1/3 to 2/3 of a quart each even at 8000 rpm (high speed photography by SMOKEY YUNICK doing stock car engine research with clear plastic valve covers prove that from what Ive read) theres about 1 quart in the lifter gallery at max and theres about 1 quart in the filter and in the oil passages in the block, that leaves at least 2 quarts in the pan at all times and for those that want to tell me about oil wrapped around the crankshaft at high rpms try squirting oil on a spinning surface doing even 2000rpm (yes that's right its thrown off as fast as it hits by centrifugal force, yes its possible for the crankshaft WITHOUT A WINDAGE SCREEN to keep acting like a propeller and pulling oil around with it in the crank case but that's what the wrap around style milodon type windage screen is designed to stop)the only way to run out of oil is to start with less than 4 quarts or to plug the oil return passages in the lifter gallery with sludge or gasket material! now add a good windage tray and a crank scrapper and almost all the oil is returned to the sump as it enters the area of the spinning crankshaft! forming a more or less endless supply to the oil pump, BTW almost all pro teams now use DRY SUMP SYSTEMS WITH POSITIVE DISPLACEMENT GERATOR PUMPS that are 3,4,or 5 stage pumps each section of which has more voluum than a standard voluum oil pump because its been found total oil control is necessary at high rpms to keep bearings cool and lubed

NOW I POSTED THIS BEFORE BUT IT NEEDs REPEATING
ok look at it this way,what your trying to do here is keep an pressureized oil film on the surface of all the bearings to lube and cool them and have enough oil spraying from the rod and main bearing clearances to lube the cam and cylinder walls/rings. now a standard pump does a good job up to 5000rpm and 400 hp but above 6000rpm and 400hp the bearings are under more stress and need more oilflow to cool and because the pressure on the bearings is greater you need higher pressures to maintain that oilfilm.lets look at the flow verus pressure curve. [color:"red"] since oil is a liquid its non-compressable and flow will increase with rpm up to the point where the bypass circuit starts to re-route the excess flow at the point were the pressure exceeds the bypass spring pressure. but the voluum will be equal to the pumps sweep voluum times the rpm of the pump, since the high voluum pump has a sweep voluum 1.3-1.5 times the standard pump voluum it will push 1.3-1.5 times the voluum of oil up to the bypass cicuit cut in point,that means that since the engine bearings leakage rate increases faster as the rpms increase because the clearances don,t change but the bleed off rate does that the amount of oil and the pressure that it is under will increase faster and reach the bypass circuit pressure faster with the high voluum pump. the advantage here is that the metal parts MUST be floated on that oil film to keep the metal parts from touching/wearing and the more leakage points the oil flows by the less the voluum of oil thats available for each leakage point beyond it and as the oil heats up it becomes easier to push through the clearences.now as the rpms and cylinder pressures increase in your goal to add power the loads trying to squeeze that oil out of those clearances also increase. ALL mods that increase power either increase rpms,cylinder pressures or reduce friction or mechanical losses. there are many oil leakage points(100) in a standard chevy engine.
16 lifter to push rod points
16 push rod to rocker arm points
32 lifter bores 16 x 2 ends
10 main bearing edges
9 cam bearing edges
16 rod bearing edges
2 distributor shaft leaks
1 distributor shaft to shim above the cam gear(some engines [/color] that have an oil pressure feed distributor shaft bearing.)
so the more oil volume the better,(AS LONG AS ITS TOTALLY UNDER CONTROL ON BOTH THE PRESSURE AND RETURN/SCAVENGING SIDES OF THE SYSTEM
chevy did an excellent job in the design but as the stresses increase the cooling volume of the extra oil available from the larger pump helps to prevent lubrication delivery failure, do you need a better pump below 5000rpm or 400hp (no) above that level the extra oil will definitely help possible deficient oil flow and bearing cooling and a simple increase in pressure does not provide a big increase in volume that may be necessary to keep that oil film in the correct places at the correct volume at all times.the stock system was designed for a 265cid engine in a passenger car turning a max of about 6000 rpm but only having the stress of under 300hp transmitted to the bearings, Im sure the original designers never thought that the sbc or bbc would someday be asked to on occasion hold up to 450-800hp and 6000-8000 rpm.nore did they forsee valvesprings that placed 500lbs and up loads on the lifters and the use of over 9 to 1 compression ratios in the original design so the oil voluums and pressures necessary to cool those valve springs and bearings at those stress levels were never taken into account for that either.

Continued (oil Pan/pump)
the oil pump can only pump as much oil as the engine clearances allow at the max pressure that the oil pump bye -pass circuit will allow, and no more. for your idea to be correct (which it could be under some conditions)the oil flow through the engine clearances would need to be so great that the pump turning at 3500rpm,7000rpm engine speed(remember the pump spins 1/2 the speed the crank does)and most likely pumping at max pressure could lower the oil level to the point that the pick-up becomes uncovered or a vortex as you call it forms and the pump starts sucking air.


now under hard acceleration it is very possiable for the pickup on ANY oil pump to to become uncovered in a oil pan that has less than 5qt capacity and with no oil control baffles as the oil rushes to the rear of the oil pan if the pick-up is located in mid pan or under hard brakeing if the pick-up is located at the rear of the pan on a non- oil baffle controlled pan.

I will grant you that it is possiable for ANY oil pump to pump a good amount of oil into the lifter gallery at high rpms IF THE OIL RETURN PASSAGES IN THE HEADS AND LIFTER GALLERY ARE BLOCKED, preventing its normal return to the crankcase

, but running a high volume oil pump will have little or nothing to do with how much oil is in the pan if the engines drain back holes are clear and your useing a milodon style windage screen. I have several times had that same complaint about lack of oil pressure under acceleration but it is caused by a non-baffled pan or the pickup mounted so close to the pan bottom that the pump cant get a good intake flow, if you carefully check youll find that on a dyno runs it seldom happens,because the oil is constantly removed by the windage screen is returned to the sump, most of the oil pumped into the system exits at the rod and main bearing clearances or at the cam bearings and from the lifter bores lower ends, its not the constant oil flow or lack of oil into the rocker arms that has the big effect on total oil flow as SMOKEY YUNICKS PHOTOGRAPIC RESEARCH PROVED YEARS AGO,its the oil flowing from the bearings and lifters and that oil flow is quickly returned to the sump by a windage screen scrapeing it off the spinning crank and rods as the spinning assembly passes over the windage screen. in effect most of the oil in an engine works like your timeing chain in that it constantly cycles top to botton and back never getting higher than the cam bearing lifter area.

now what does quite frequently happen [/color] is that the guys installing a high volume oil pump just swap out the standard pump, reinstall the stock or simular pick-up and bolt on the pan with the pick-up in the stock possition on the oil pump. the stock pick-up is mounted about 3/8" off the pan bottom,the high volume pump is normally equiped with impeller gears about .3 inches longer than stock, the high volume pump body is that much lower in the pan, resultting in the pick-up being only about 1/8" from the pan bottom. the result is that on a normal chevy oil pump pick-up this leave a space of about 1/8" x 2.5" for oil to flow into the pump. at low rpms this works but as the rpms climb the pick-up that can,t get any oil to pump cavitates as it spins and fails to pump oil, result oil pressure drops untill rpms are lowered no matter how much oil is over the pick-up. simply checking to make sure that anout 1/2" of space is under the pick-up when the pan is installed cures that problem (a simple trick is to weld a 1/2" thick nut to the oil pump Pick-up base and test fitting the pan BEFORE WELDING THE PICK-UP TO THE PUMP BODY)

what it comes down too in every case that Ive looked into so far is a improperly positioned pick-up or a non- baffled oil pan without a windage screen or less than 5 qts of oil in the system, not a problem of all available oil being pumped into the lifter gallery and valve covers like some people would like you to think.

the MELLING COMPANY HAS THIS TO SAY

Most of the stock automobile engines are designed to operate from idle to 4500 RPM. The original volume and pressure oil pump will work fine in this type of application. As the demands on the engine increase so does the demands on the oiling system and pump.
The oil pump's most difficult task is to supply oil to the connecting rod bearing that is the farthest from the pump. To reach this bearing, the oil travels from three to four feet, turns numerous square corners thru small holes in the crankshaft to the rod bearing. The rod bearing doesn't help matters. It is traveling in a circle which means centrifugal force is pulling the oil out of the bearing.

A 350 Chevy has a 3.4811 stroke and a 2.111 rod journal. The outer edge of the journal travels 17.5311 every revolution. At 1000 RPM, the outer edge is traveling at 16.6 MPH and 74.7 MPH at 4500 RPM. If we take this engine to 6500 the outer edge is up to 107.9 and at 8500 it is 141.1 MPH. Now imagine driving a car around a curve at those speeds and you can feel the centrifugal force. Now imagine doing it around a circle with a 5.581, diameter.

The size of the gears or rotors determines the amount of oil a pump can move at any given RPM. Resistance to this movement creates the pressure. If a pump is not large enough to meet the demands of the engine, there will not be any pressure. Or if the demands of the engine are increased beyond the pumps capabilities there will be a loss of oil pressure. This is where high volume pumps come in; they take care of any increased demands of the engine.

Increases in the engine's oil requirements come from higher RPM, being able to rev faster, increased bearing clearances, remote oil cooler and/or filter and any combination of these. Most high volume pumps also have a increase in pressure to help get the oil out to the bearings faster.

That is what a high volume pump will do. Now let Is consider what it will not do.

It will not replace a rebuild in a worn-out engine. It may increase pressure but the engine is still worn-out.

It will not pump the oil pan dry. Both solid and hydraulic lifters have metering valves to limit flow of the oil to the top of the engine. If a pan is pumped dry, it is because the holes that drain oil back to the pan are plugged. If the high volume pump is also higher pressure, there will be a slight increase in flow to the top.

http://paceperformance.com/index.asp?Pa ... dID=125977
http://paceperformance.com/ProductImage ... s/1322.gif[img]
youll need this or a similar adapter to hook uo an oil cooler to your engine block

Oil cooler sandwich adapters allow for the installation of an engine oil cooler,without the need to re-locate the oil filter.They are 1 5/8" thick with 3/8" NPT inlets and outlets.(Excludes TD1322 which is 2 1/4" thick with 3/8" npt inlets and outlets.)Each adapter is equipped with a pressure and tempurature responsive bypass valve that reduces the risk of oil starvation during cold startups.




heres other info,
http://www.babcox.com/editorial/ar/ar10180.htm

http://www.thirskauto.net/BearingPics.html

http://www.waynesgarage.com/docs/oil.htm

http://www.jimcookperformance.com/TechNotes/TN%2023.html




http://www.cryoeng.com/images/EngineDurabilitySecrets.htm

http://www.melling.com/engoil.html

http://members.aol.com/carleyware/library/engine2t.htm

things to read carefully
http://www.triumphspitfire.com/Oiltest.html
http://www.shotimes.com/SHO3oilfilter.html

http://www.micapeak.com/info/oiled.html

http://www.melling.com/engoil.html
http://www.4unique.com/lubrication/...on_tutorial.htm
http://www.performanceoiltechnology...lubrication.htm
http://www.bobistheoilguy.com/
http://www.hatcocorporation.com/pages/about_esters.html
http://www.nordicgroup.us/oil.htm

http://people.msoe.edu/~yoderw/oilf...ilterstudy.html
http://www.scuderiaciriani.com/rx7/oil.html



OIL PUMPS REQUIRE SOME THOUGHT ALSO
braze the pick-up tube to the pump body so the pick up is 3/8" MINIMUM, 1/2" maximum from the oil pan floor and use a large lump of MODELING CLAY (every mechanic should have some its great for checking clearances)on the pickup then install the pan temp. with no gasket and remove to measure the thickness of the clay
your local arts/craft store sells it in 1 lb blocks I usually use brite blue or black but suit your self, a digital caliper or even a ruler will get you the thickness measurement your looking for)

http://store.yahoo.com/teacher-parent-store/modelingclay.html

http://www.guildcraftinc.com/ProductInfo.aspx?productid=102-500

once its correctly possitioned ,[b]remove the bye pass spring and gears from the oil pump,and have the pick-up brazeD or welded to the pump body, then after it SLOWLY AIR cools (DON,T DROP IT IN WATER LET IT AIR COOL)replace the byepass spring and gears, lube the pump,with assembly lube on the gears, check the clearances, check clearances again! and install! just be damn sure its brazed or welded in the correct location as that 3/8"-1/2" is critical to good oil voluum feeding the pick-up
Image

Image
http://users.erols.com/jyavins/solder.htm
http://www.tinmantech.com/html/faq_brazing_versus_soldering.html

http://www.epemag.wimborne.co.uk/solderfaq.htm

silver soldering is basically lower temp brazening , the soldering metal flows over the surface and into micro cracks in the surface of the other metal forming a almost unremoveable bond to the other metals surface it allows you to stick iron to steel or brass to steel, it works more or less like normal solder does on copper but at higher temps and has a much stronger grip in addition too working on iron and steel
Image
Image
I vastly prefer the 5 BOLT BBC style pumps with the 12 tooth gears and their larger 3/4" pick-up VS the small 4 bolt pumps with their 5/8" pick-ups and 7 tooth gears. the oil flow is both higher pressure at low rpms and smoother in pulse pressure spread,no! you don,t need it on a non-race combo, or even on some race combos but its nice to have and I willingly will loose a few hp pumping oil for better engine lubrication
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: engine oil temps.

Postby grumpyvette » October 9th, 2008, 2:00 pm

IF you want to install a temp, sensor dirrectly into the oil pan,you can BUY weld- on BUNGS in most pipe thread sizes and place them where you want on the oil pan sump

http://www.jegs.com/p/Russell/762479/10002/-1/10019
http://www.racepartsolutions.com/products.asp?cat=107
Image

http://www.dakotadigital.com/index.cfm/ ... prd329.htm

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http://www.dakotadigital.com/index.cfm/ ... prd329.htm


there may be a mis -conception here,in some of your minds the trans or oil cooler with a thermostat controlling oil flow, or transmission fluid thru the cooler doesn,t block flow thru the transmission or the engine, at any time, it re-routes SOME of the oil flow , or transmission fluid thru the cooler,most guys hook it up so theres only part of the oil or transmission fluid passing thru the oil cooler
When oil temperature exceeds 180°F the thermostatic valve closes, allowing 95% flow through the oil cooler. At temperatures below 180°F the valve is open, with 90% of the oil bypassing the cooler. The remaining 10% of the oil flows through the cooler, maintaining constant system pressure, preventing air pockets and eliminating cold oil shock. Flows up to 20 gallons per minute (GPM). Rated to 200 p.s.i. Thermostat mounting kits containing four brass fittings, four stainless steel hose clamps and two nylon tie mounts are sold separately.


http://www.racerpartswholesale.com/down ... ostats.pdf

http://97.74.103.94/files/thermos$.pdf

http://www.jegs.com/i/Perma-Cool/771/10 ... tId=748655



the oil t-stat comes with port identification and installation instructions as to oil line routing,when oils below 180 f most of it routes in on the top left port (feed from engine) and back out the lower left (back to the engine), as temps increase more oil is routed out the top right(too oil cooler) and once thru the oil or transmission cooler back into the t-stat on the lower right, which feeds oil to the lower left and back to the engine, theres always 100% full oil flow, but at cool temps about 15% routes thru the cooler, at higher temps about 80% routes thru the cooler

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IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: engine oil temps.

Postby grumpyvette » February 25th, 2009, 8:52 pm

http://www.bmpdesign.com/product-exec/p ... rch_model/

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they come in several designs, most work rather well, dropping oil temps 5-15F

http://billetcool.com/s296n.htm

those cooling fins for oil filters come in several designs, and think about this, if you buy one with the screw clamp, like the blue one a few minutes with a band saw will easily convert it to the band clamp style that will fit almost any size filter

http://cgi.ebay.com/ebaymotors/Volkswag ... dZViewItem
Product Description:

The Item you are bidding on is specifically designed to slip over the outside of your factory oil filter. Your filter is approximately 3 inches in diameter, which matches the Inside diameter of the cooler. The overall outside diameter of the finned portion of the cooler is 4 inches. To assure there is no interference with any components on the overall outside diameter you must have at least 5/8" space between the filter and the nearest component around your oil filter. This includes mounts, brackets, hosed, etc. Some vehicles may vary, so maybe take a quick look before bidding. If interference is only in one specific spot, you can use a belt sander or bench grinder to remove a small portion of the fins. Cooler installation is simple.

To Install: Simply slip the unit over the filter and tighter the 2 Allen bolts.

you gentlemen, might want to keep in mind ALL oils are designed to carry heat, from the bearings and combustion process generated crud to the filter , and all oil slowly gets filled with micro crud,soot, acids and breaks down from heat and moisture contamination,over time, oil is cheap compared to major engine failures from lubricated parts failure. and while the newer synthetics are far better, than the older oils, its been my experience that keeping any synthetic oil over about 15,000-18,000 miles between changes even with frequent filter changes is probably a bad idea.
obviously the operational conditions, heat levels and stress levels should be taken into consideration.
now you certainly don,t need to change oil every 3500 miles like has in the past been suggested with the older generation oils. but changing oil every 7,000-8,000 miles certainly won,t be hurting much, and if you want to use the better oils over about 15,000-18,000 miles between changes even with frequent filter changes, thats certainly not likely to cause major issues and changing oil filters every 3500,-4000 mile can,t hurt either
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: engine oil temps.

Postby grumpyvette » June 11th, 2009, 1:42 pm

theres two ways , you can use the correct tool,ADVISEABLE!

http://www.speedwaymotors.com/Oil-Pump- ... GoogleBase

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or lets go the cheaper route,you clamp the oil pump body minus the gears and base plate (which you remove temporarily) in a vise with the tube entrance facing vertically and clamped between two sections of 1/2" plywood to cushion the vice jaws you find a crows foot open end wrench that slides over the oil pump pick-up tube but not over the ridge, in the tube that in theory prevents you from inserting the tube too deeply into the pump body.
use a 8" extension and the crows foot wrench and a rubber mallet to seat the pick-up tube into the pump body, then temporarily mount the oil pump and place a lump of modeling clay on the pick-up body lower surface and install the oil pan for a second to compress the clay giving you the distance between the oil pump pick-up and the oil pan floor, adjust it until the distance is approximately 3/8"-1/2"
once that distance is correct BRAZE the pickup to the pump body AFTER temporarily removing the bye-pass spring so it won,t get annealed
once that's done you clean lube and re-install the pump components and verify clearances, and the gears spin freely with out binding, don,y forget to use some MOLY assembly lube on the gears to assure it primes quickly
viewtopic.php?f=54&t=52&p=61&hilit=+braze#p61

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IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Site Admin
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Posts: 14105
Joined: September 14th, 2008, 1:40 pm
Location: florida


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