brake fluid info,



brake fluid info,

Postby grumpyvette » June 29th, 2009, 10:33 am


READ THIS THREAD BELOW ALSO


viewtopic.php?f=63&t=526

brake fluid info

http://www.afcoracing.com/tech_pages/fluid.shtml

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Brake_fluid

http://www.stoptech.com/tech_info/wp_br ... d_1a.shtml

http://www.motorcycleproject.com/motorc ... fluid.html

http://www.familycar.com/brakes.htm

http://www.timskelton.com/lightning/rac ... _fluid.htm

http://www.aa1car.com/library/bfluid.htm

http://www.ehow.com/how_1846_check-brake-fluid.html

http://www.buckeyetriumphs.org/technica ... /Fluid.htm

http://www.v8sho.com/SHO/Brake_Fluid2.htm

http://www.shotimes.com/SHO3brakefluid.html


KEEP IN MIND most types of brake fluid absorb moisture over time, this WILL result in rust if the brake fluids not changed and your brakes hydraulic system will rust if its not flushed out regularly.(at least every 40 k mikes, or every 18 months-to- two years is usually safe on a street car)
you generally DON,T WANT TO MIX brake fluid types.
moisture , that's been absorbed by brake fluid will turn to steam destroying your ability to brake the car if the fluid gets hot enough and it CAN under hard repeat braking!
flush the master cylinder and brake lines with the new fluid DON,T MIX THEM
yes some dot 3 and dot 4 brake fluids are fully compatible but you'll generally find you get far more responsive brakes if the fluids fresh, moisture free and all one type, keep in mind the brake pad, brake caliper, size, design,and material and rotor design will also effect your results.
rotors can glow dull red hot on a race car, wheel bearing grease must also be designed to handle the heat range on a car that's driven hard


Image


Dry Boiling Point Wet Boiling Point
DOT 3 401ºF ....... 284º F

DOT 4 446º F....... 311º F
DOT 5 500º F....... 356º F
DOT 5.1 518º F ...... 375º F


A Primer on Brake Fluids: DOT, DOT, Who's Got the DOT?
By Mike Allen

Like most automotive fluids, brake fluids carry specific ratings, in this case prefixed by the letters DOT, for Department of Transportation. Follow the car manufacturer's recommendations as to the type you need, which will be either DOT 3 or DOT 4.

DOT 3 fluid has a dry boiling point of 205 C and a wet boiling point of 140 C. Most normal-duty cars and trucks should use DOT 3 fluid.

DOT 4 fluid has a higher boiling point, 230 C (dry) and 155 C (wet), but it is also slightly more viscous, making it less suitable for some vehicles.

DOT 5 (silicone) fluids are popular with restorers. They don't attract moisture, which is good for cars that are stored for much of the time and not driven often. Do not use silicone fluid in ABS-equipped vehicles. It's too viscous and gives a mushy pedal.
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: brake fluid info,

Postby grumpyvette » August 30th, 2011, 4:25 pm

it should be obvious that larger diam. aluminum wheels and larger race design brakes are a huge improvement over the older non-disc brake designs and the current synthetic brake fluids dissipate and can operate under high heat levels
I think the brake fluid over heating deal is a bit bogus, racing brakes glow cherry red on many cars, carbon pads easily handle over 1000F temps and current brake fluids don,t reach boiling points in properly vented brakes
both calipers and wheels handle the heat and dissipate the heat to the air fairly effectively,simple math indicates a 17" aluminum corvette wheel has about 700 plus square inches of surface area exposed to air flow
larger wheels allow larger brake components like calipers, discs and rotors and that allows larger pad surface areas and larger rotors,have more external surface area for the pads to contact and more internal vents for centrifugal force to throw air thru to dissipate heat faster. and larger wheels allow more surface area to dissipate heat. larger wheels potentially provide more tire surface area on the pavement and better braking thru increased leverage.
larger wheels also tend to allow larger calipers and brake rotors that operate more effectively as a heat sink, larger parts that absorb have more mass and surface area and dissipated braking heat faster.

related info

viewtopic.php?f=34&t=13&p=18#p18

viewtopic.php?f=34&t=380
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

User avatar
Site Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14105
Joined: September 14th, 2008, 1:40 pm
Location: florida


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