axles, differentials and related info



axles, differentials and related info

Postby grumpyvette » February 22nd, 2009, 5:26 pm

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IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
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Re: axles, differentials and related info

Postby grumpyvette » November 6th, 2010, 6:49 pm

Ive been asked numerous times what the AVERAGE life span of a muscle car differential is likely to be?
axles and bearings and ring& pinion components vary a great deal as do the car weights, transmission shock loads and engine torque levels, not to mention tire size and traction, and it should also be obvious that the driving style will vary wildly.
changing the lubricant in the rear differential with the designed fluid , and the u-joints at least every 60-80K miles in a performance street car subjected to higher stress is a good maintenance idea. the better synthetic lube tends to prolong use and lower operational temps. changing lube about every 60K-80K tends to reduce wear and remove metallic crap that increases wear, but read the manufacturers instructions carefully because many rear differentials require friction additives with the lube

http://www.autoblog.com/2006/04/02/auto ... axle-lube/
http://www.royalpurple.com/gear-oil.html
I have NO idea what you may be using, in a rear differential used in muscle or performance cars,and it should be obvious that both the type of the differential and the components used and the stress they are subjected to will effect the expected life span.
normally larger and heavier parts, found in most muscle cars like a 9" ring and pinion set from a ford or 9 3/4" from a dana 60 will be significantly stronger than a significantly smaller rear like the 7.5"-8.2" versions of the G.M. 10 bolts, found in some camaros or even the 8.7/8" 12 bolt Chevy rears.
most of the more common rear differentials have aftermarket components available that have better quality metals and heat treatment, but if your goal is to race a high horse power car with a good deal of torque, a car the smaller rear differential components like axles and bearing in lets say a 10 bolt G.M. rear even with aftermarket components will be weaker than, a similar set of aftermarket components in the larger ford or dana 60 rear differential, just like a 2x4 board is easier to break than a 2x6 board the smaller axles and u-joints also tend to be weaker.
but I can tell you my experience with differentials, first let me point out that you obviously need to keep the differential fluid levels up to the proper levels and in many cases a synthetic differential fluid helps lower wear and lower running temperatures.
axle bearings and seals and u-joint sizes also vary wildly between muscle cars,and corvettes,vipers, cobras ETC. so factors like the axle diam. ,number of splines, the pinion bearing size and how the differentials being internally supported will effect the stress and shock loads it can regularly sustain, generally an automatic transmission induces a bit lower shock loads even with the same engine power levels.
yes size matters in this case, its rather foolish in my opinion to buy expensive aftermarket parts for a rear differential if the basic problem is that the rear differential your working on and hoping to increase the durability of, if that rear differential was never designed to hold up to loads near what your subjecting it to. It smart to start with a basic rear differential design with the required mass and strength that even stock components will be reasonably expected to stand the loads imposed at least for awhile and then up grade to the stronger components, that way you've got a decent chance of having a durable rear when your done!
now obviously larger rear differential tend to be heavier, but you need to reach a compromise where your not constantly busting components or weights of no concern, if you can,t finish a race.
axle material and diam. plus the increased spline counts help and ring and pinon gears,and bearings in the larger rear differentials, being more massive is a huge help, in durability, but remember U-joints and half shafts fail frequently under high shock torque loads so its not just the rear differential that fails in IRS cars
keep in mind that if your building a race car theres nothing preventing you from ordering a 5 bolt chevy lug pattern on a rear differential with lets say ford disc brakes on a dana 70 rear differential if you talk it over with a good fabrication shop

GM 7.875" (dana 36)
GM 8,5" (10 BOLT)(dana 44)
GM 8.875" (12 bolt)
FORD 9"
DANA 60 9.75"
GM 10.5" (14 bolt)
Dana 70 10.5"

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http://www.ford-trucks.com/article/idx/ ... Setup.html
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
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