C4 and camaro sensor and relay/switch locations and info



C4 and camaro sensor and relay/switch locations and info

Postby grumpyvette » November 17th, 2008, 3:13 pm

this infos bound to be helpful at times
READ THE THREAD THRU TO THE END AND BE AWARE IT, AND ALL OTHER THREADS ARE CONSTANTLY UPDATED WITH NEW LINKS AND INFO
yes IM aware some guys would rather dig out their eye with a red hot fork that to read links, but if you take the time to actually research,pull the trouble codes and READ THRU the shop manual and, use diagnostic tools. like code scanners, and multi meter,timing lights, vacuum gauges etc,..... before jumping into "fixing" problems. in most cases youll find its far faster and easier to locate and correct the problem.
LOOK FOR LOOSE OR CORRODED ELECTRICAL WIRING CONNECTORS, in THE WIRING HARNESS, and VERIFY YOUR FIRING ORDER, YEAH I KNOW YOUR SURE ITS CORRECT, CHECK IT CAREFULLY AGAIN, YOUR NOID TEST LIGHT AND MULTI- METER CAN SAVE YOU A GREAT DEAL OF PROBLEMS AND SCRATCHING YOUR HEAD IF YOU TEST BASIC ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS< RESISTANCE AND VOLTAGE, CHECK YOUR SENSORS AND GROUNDS, A SHOP MANUALS MANDATORY, HEAT SENSORS AND IGNITION MODULES AND OIL PRESSURE SENSORS HAVE A LONG TRACK RECORD OF FAILING OR PARTIALLY AND INTERMITTENTLY NOT FUNCTIONING
IM JUST CURIOUS?
how many of you gentlemen go to a computer, print out related wiring diagrams ,get out a multi meter and a shop manual and actually read the shop manual, and step thru the indicated testing procedures? check for voltage ohms resistance, loose connections, etc. and have actually used the shop manual, multi meter and printed wiring diagrams ans instructions to isolate and solve a problem on your car?

if you have at lease 38 psi in the fuel rail, and it holds at or near at least 38 psi for at least a couple minutes after you stop cranking the engine, the fuel pressure regulator is most likely functioning correctly, but you state the injectors are not squirting fuel and the pump keeps running while you crank the engine?
you can test the electrical connectors on the injectors with a noid test light to watch the electric pulse,at each injector location, ID verify timing injector resistance,and check for vacuum leaks while testing, and remember theres a 9th cold start injector on the 1985-88 TPI fuel rail
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first check your shop manual for the fuse and fuse able link locations
fuses are located in several locations and fuse-able links near the battery, NOW GET A MULTI METER AND CHECK ALL THE FUSES , AND GROUNDS AND BATTERY VOLTAGE AND ELECTRICAL CONNECTIONS LIKE BATTER CABLES AND SENSOR WIRE CONNECTIONS, BECAUSE A SURPRISING NUMBER OF PROBLEMS ON OLDER CORVETTES AND MUSCLE CARS ARE RELATED TO BLOWN FUZES, LOOSE OR CORRODED CONNECTORS, AND BAD BATTERY CONNECTION CABLES OR WEAL BATTERY'S OR DEFECTIVE ALTERNATORS


IF YOU skip the links and you'll miss a good deal of useful info
[b] ANY TIME YOU SUSPECT FUEL INJECTOR OR FUEL SYSTEM RELATED ISSUES ,A REASONABLE START POINT IS TO USE A GOOD QUALITY FUEL INJECTION CLEANER ADDITIVE IN THE FUEL TANK AND SWAP TO A NEW FUEL FILTER

http://www.bgprod.com/catalog/gasoline- ... m-cleaner/
http://www.bgprod.com/catalog/gasoline- ... m-cleaner/
[/b]
AND YES AMAZINGLY, ACTUALLY READING THRU THE POSTED LINKS AND SUB LINKS might help

http://www.chevythunder.com/fuel%20inje ... pg%20B.htm

http://www.mainstreamtopics.com/forums/ ... iagnostic/

http://www.mamotorworks.com/corvette-c4 ... -6128.html
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Intake Air Temp sensor. It is located on the bottom of the inlet plenum a few inches ahead of the distributor. It is like right next to the fuel pressure regulator., it can effect fuel flow rates

If your experiencing intermittent electrical issues you will obviously need to get out the shop manual for your year corvette, a multi meter and do some isolate and testing, but be aware that loose or corroded connections , will be hard to isolate, as they seldom present a consistent, solid open or dead short in the wire,theres several electrical connector plugs that connect thru the firewall near the battery location that are subject to corrosion issues and frame grounds that might be suspect, obviously theres sensors that can be defective.

links with lots of sub-links that should be useful, most guys ,faced with isolating an electrical issue, seem to get over whelmed, but if you get out the schematics, use a multi meter and some logic in tracing the circuits, and start pulling fuses and measuring resistance and voltage, take the time to read the manual ,pull trouble codes,and if required get a scan tool or a data logging program for your lap top computer, and using the shop manual, you can generally isolate the cause

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=80&t=728&p=9217&hilit=+sensors+location#p9217

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=32&t=1401&p=39419&hilit=+sensors+location#p39419

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=32&t=2697&p=29270&hilit=+sensors+location#p29270

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=8136&p=28980&hilit=scan+tool#p28980

viewtopic.php?f=27&t=3096&p=18612&hilit=scan+software#p18612

viewtopic.php?f=44&t=758&p=1087&hilit=opti+crap#p1087

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http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=32&t=1401

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=32&t=168

viewtopic.php?f=2&t=3074&p=8144#p8144

viewtopic.php?f=36&t=3222&p=8575&hilit=test+alternator#p8575

viewtopic.php?f=70&t=3504&p=9220#p9220

viewtopic.php?f=36&t=8493&p=29779#p29779

viewtopic.php?f=44&t=3401&p=8972&hilit=test+alternator#p8972

viewtopic.php?f=55&t=1241&p=3037&hilit=test+alternator+coil+test#p3037

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=609&p=810&hilit=test+alternator+coil+test#p810

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=32&t=596

http://scehovic.angelfire.com/C4starts.html

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=70&t=4683

http://shbox.com/1/component_location_views.html

http://www.smogtips.com/trouble-codes.cfm

http://www.aa1car.com/library/us796obd.htm

viewtopic.php?f=57&t=2538&p=6984#p6984

viewtopic.php?f=32&t=2697&p=6985#p6985

viewtopic.php?f=36&t=768&p=2394&hilit=+manual#p2394

viewtopic.php?f=36&t=520&p=645&hilit=vats+resistor#p645

Sensor Locations
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knowing whats going on and WHY can help

http://www.corvettefever.com/techarticl ... index.html

http://members.shaw.ca/corvette86/Component%20Location%20View%2086.pdf

http://members.shaw.ca/corvette86/FuelSystemDiagnosis.pdf


http://www.summitracing.com/parts/HYP-4026/

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/HDA-3653/
Sensor
Location

Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor. Front of engine, below Throttle Body.

Engine Oil Temperature Sensor. Left rear of engine, just above the oil filter.

viewtopic.php?f=54&t=1396&p=3221&hilit=+switch#p3221

Oil Pressure Sender/Switch. Top, left hand rear of engine.

Fuel Quantity Sender. Top of fuel tank, beneath filler pipe escutcheon panel.

MAT (Manifold Absolute Temperature Sensor). Underside of manifold air plenum at rear.

Outside Temperature Sensor. Right side of engine, top right corner of radiator.

In Car Temp Temperature Sensor. Coupe: above left seat near interior courtesy light, Convertible: center of cargo compartment lid.

MAF (Mass Air Flow) Sensor. Front of engine ahead of throttle body.

http://tpiparts.net/85_89_maf_sensors/

Oxygen (O2) Sensor. Left side of engine, in exhaust pipe.(some years have two ,one on both sides)

TPS (Throttle Position Sensor). Right side of throttle body at the front.


Sensor Outputs:

Sensor
Measured Value

Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor. 185 Ohms @ 210F, 3400 Ohms @ 68F, 7,500 Ohms @ 39 F.

Engine Oil Temperature Sensor. 185 Ohms @ 210 F, 3400 Ohms @ 68 F, 7,500 Ohms @39 F.

Oil Pressure Sender/Switch. 1 Ohms @ 0 PSI, 43 Ohms @ 30 PSI, 86 Ohms @ 60 PSI.

Fuel Quantity Sender. 0 Ohms @ Empty, 45 Ohms @ 1/2 Full, 90 Ohms @ Full.

MAT (Manifold Absolute Temperature Sensor). 185 Ohms @ 210 F, 3400 Ohms @ 70 F, 15,000 Ohms @ 40 F.

Outside Temperature Sensor. 4400 Ohms @ 60 F, 2200 Ohms @ 85 F.

In Car Temp Temperature Sensor. 4400 Ohms @ 60 F, 2200 Ohms @ 85 F.

MAF (Mass Air Flow) Sensor. .4 Volts @ idle, 5 Volts @ Full Throttle.

Oxygen (O2) Sensor. .1 Volt Lean Mixture, .9 Volt Rich Mixture.

TPS (Throttle Position Sensor). .54 Volts Idle, ~ 5 Volts Full Throttle.
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IAC and TPS Adjustment
http://www.thirdgen.org/tpimod2

TPI Injector Swap
http://www.thirdgen.org/injectorswap

Throttle Body Coolant Bypass
http://www.thirdgen.org/coolantbypass

http://www.jcwhitney.com/autoparts/Sear ... p=ZX503796

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/SUN-CP9001

http://www.etoolcart.com/autoxray-scann ... x6000.aspx

viewtopic.php?f=32&t=304

ID also suggest buying a diagnostic tool, with real time data logging to a lap top computer, and your shop manual, it helps isolate problems, ignition spark should be bright blue and impressive, if its, weak,narrow, yellow or red theres a problem so research the cause, verify the coil and voltage


the oil system sensors are all well known potential sources for oil leaks ,and ignition problems as a defective sensor, cuts off the ignition,
READ THE LINKS
but the two blade sensor on the rear of the block, near the distributor base on the early c4 is a known , frequently defective part, and not only will it leak oil, if the switch is defective the fuel pump operation is random or not functional, it will also as it goes defective give intermittent or oil pressure readings that fluctuate.
if you start seeing oil on the rear of the block, its not always a defective rear seal , loose oil filter or loose defective rear intake manifold gasket, check the sensors near the distributor base.

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http://www.ecklers.com/corvette-oil-pressure-sender-1985-1987.html

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http://www.ecklers.com/corvette-fuel-pump-switch-oil-pressure-sender-1989-1996.html

Corvette Fuel Pump Switch/Oil Pressure Sender, 1989-1996

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Corvette Oil Pressure Sender, 1985-1987
http://www.ecklers.com/corvette-oil-pressure-sender-1985-1987.html?crosssell=Product_Viewed

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Corvette Oil Temperature Sensor, 1990-1996
http://www.ecklers.com/corvette-oil-temperature-sensor-1990-1996.html

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get out your shop manual and multi meter

[/b][/color]
read thru these links


http://members.shaw.ca/agent86/Fuel%20Control%20And%20Delivery-8A.pdf
http://members.shaw.ca/corvette86/EngineCranksButWontRun.pdf
http://members.shaw.ca/corvette86/FuelSystemDiagnosis.pdf
http://members.shaw.ca/corvette86/No-Service%20Engine%20Soon%20-%20Light.pdf
http://members.shaw.ca/corvette86/SES%20Light%20On%20Steady.pdf
http://members.shaw.ca/corvette86/Non%20Scan%20Diagnostic%20Circuit%20Check.pdf
http://members.shaw.ca/corvette86/Engine%20to%20ECM%20Wiring%20Diagram%2086.pdf
http://members.shaw.ca/corvette86/Component%20Location%20View%2086.pdf
http://www.summitracing.com/parts/hfm-zfswf/overview/

http://static.summitracing.com/global/i ... -zfswf.pdf

http://www.summitracing.com/parts/hfm-zfswfk/overview/

http://members.shaw.ca/corvette86/FuelSystemDiagnosis.pdf
]
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THE DIAGRAM ABOVE HAS THE CORRECT WIRE COLORS

BTW FAULTY GROUNDS, IN MANY CARS AND ESPECIALLY NEWER CORVETTES CAUSE MANY ELECTRICAL ISSUES SO IF YOU HAVE INTERMITTENT ELECTRICAL ISSUES CHECK THEM CAREFULLY
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LCD dash ground is behind drivers kick panel . There are also several electrical grounds down just above the oil filter and one behind the passenger kick panel for the ECM. and a couple on the rear of the drivers side cylinder head, Grounds are a constant issue on most c4's. Hope this helps.
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: C4 sensor info

Postby grumpyvette » November 29th, 2008, 11:33 am

info that might help (before you ask, yeah the LT1 is very similar)

L-98 Engine Start Sequence

knowing whats going on and WHY can help

http://members.shaw.ca/corvette86/Component%20Location%20View%2086.pdf

http://tpiparts.net/85_89_maf_sensors/

http://members.shaw.ca/corvette86/FuelSystemDiagnosis.pdf

When you start an L-98 engine Corvette, a series of events take place that causes the engine to run. Knowing the sequence will help you troubleshoot no start conditions. ignition spark should be bright blue and impressive, if its, weak,narrow, yellow or red theres a problem so research the cause, verify the coil and voltage

Fuel Rail Pressurization:

When you first turn the key to the “on” position, the fuel pump will run for 2 seconds pressurizing the fuel rails. There is a Shraeder valve on the passenger side fuel rail near the rear of the engine and if you measure the pressure there after the pump runs, you should see between 40-42 pounds of pressure. The reading will go to 38-40 pounds nominal once the engine is running.test by attaching a fuel pressure gauge to the fuel rail at the shrader valve, on TPI and LT1 engines its located on the pass side fuel rail

Initial Crank Action:

If you then rotate the key to the start position (assuming the anti-theft system has not disabled the starter), the engine will rotate.

Once the oil pressure has reached 4 PSI, the oil pressure switch will close allowing the fuel pump to run. (Note that you should have a black oil pressure switch/sender. It is mounted behind the distributor on the driver’s side and if it is not black, it is suspect due to a run of bad units that stayed in the GM parts pipeline for some time).

The distributor will send a string of pulses to the ECM (Engine Control Module) in response to the engine being rotated by the starter. These pulses continue as long as the engine turns (both starting and running) and if they are not present, the engine will not run.

ECM Reaction:

If the ECM sees oil pressure greater than 4 PSI and the reference pulses from the distributor, it will energize the injector drivers which will begin pulsing the injectors on for 4 ms (milliseconds) periods. (In the L98, all injectors on one side of the engine fire at the same time followed by all injectors on the other side firing at the same time. On the LT-1, the injectors are fired individually at the appropriate time).

The ECM will also pull in the fuel pump relay in effect paralleling it electrically with the oil pressure switch. (If the fuel pump relay fails, you can still normally get the car to start and run unless you can’t make at least 4 PSI oil pressure. This is a “limp home mode” feature put in place to allow for a fuel pump relay failure).

The ECM also monitors the TPS (Throttle Position Sensor mounted on the throttle body assembly) and wants to see .54 volts at this time. If it sees appreciably more than 0.54 volts, it will assume the engine is flooded and the driver has pressed the accelerator to the floor to clear the flooded condition and restrict the fuel flow as a result. (.54 volts during start and at idle from the TPS is very important to both starting and run performance.)

Assuming the ignition module is good (meaning there is a spark of sufficient intensity to ignite the fuel), the engine will “catch”.

Engine "Catches":

When the engine catches, the MAF (Mass Air Flow sensor mounted just ahead of the throttle body) sends a signal to the ECM advising that air is flowing and also just how much air is being pulled through to the intake manifold. The ECM takes note of the amount of air being consumed and adjusts the injector pulse width to around 2.2 ms nominally so as to attain a proper air/fuel mixture to insure combustion. (This is how the 1985 through 1989 L-98 works. For information on the 1990 and 1991 L-98 variant, see the Note below).

The engine should show an initial idle speed of around 900-1100 RPM and then slowly diminish to 600-700 RPM unless the air conditioner is on in which case it will run at around 800 RPM.

If this does not happen, the Idle Air Mixture valve (located on the throttle body) may be misadjusted. Alternatively, there may be a leak in the intake manifold or another vacuum leak may be present. Listen for hissing sounds---there should be none.

ECM Mode:

The engine will now be in Open Loop mode meaning that the ECM is controlling the air/fuel mixture by referencing values stored in memory.
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Once the Oxygen sensor (mounted on the exhaust pipe) reaches operating temperature of several hundred degrees, the Manifold Air Temperature (MAT) sensor shows an intake air temperature of more than 140 degrees and the Engine Coolant Temperature (ECT) has reached 160 degrees, the computer will switch to closed loop mode meaning the Oxygen sensor’s output is examined along with the MAT and ECT outputs and the ECM adjusts the injector pulse widths (more “on time” or less “on time”) to constantly strive for a 14.7:1 air/fuel mixture which is the best mixture to hold down pollution.

Note that prolonged idling can force the computer back into open loop mode.

Note: In 1990, the MAF was eliminated from the engine in favor of a speed/density system. This system uses a sensor called the MAP sensor which measures the Manifold Absolute Pressure (hence the name MAP) and compares it with the atmospheric pressure outside the intake manifold. This information, coupled with the Manifold Air Temperature, Engine Coolant Temperature and Engine RPM is used by the ECM to determine the amount of air entering the cylinders. It is a different way of reaching the desired 14.7:1 air-fuel mixture ratio but functionally is like the MAF system in that the ECM uses the feedback to control the "on time" for the injectors.

Corvette used this approach in the 1990 and 1991 L-98 engines and in the 1992 and 1993 LT-1 engines. With the 1994 model C4, they went back to the MAF system. Note that MAF based systems are far more accurate since they measure air flow directly whereas the MAP system infers air flow indirectly. A multitude of things can throw the calculation off and Corvette returned to the MAF system beginning with the 1994 C4 (with a MAP backup). From a troubleshooting standpoint, the MAP operation comes into the sequence the same place that the MAF does.
viewtopic.php?f=56&t=3049&p=8053#p8053

Summary:

If you have a no start condition or if the L-98 starts and then dies, check the above items in sequence to see if all the events are occurring as required.

A Scan Tool makes this job much easier and is a highly recommended troubleshooting aid for these sorts of problems.



http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/Displayitem.taf?itemnumber=46030

Most of the C4 Corvettes used a MAF (Mass Air Flow) sensor to determine how much air is being pulled into the intake manifold. The exceptions are the 1984 Corvette that used a speed density system--a sort of predictive method of measurement---and the 1990 through 1993 C4 models which were also speed density based. In 1994, Corvette went back to the MAF based system but used the speed density approach as a back up. (1989 Bosch MAF installation shown at right).

A Mass Air Flow sensor has an extremely fine wire inside its bore. The 1985 through 1989 C4 engines used a Bosch MAF sensor that heated the wire to 100 C. The 1994 and later C4 models used a AC/Delco MAF that heated the wire to 200 C. The amount of current required to reach the temperature is measured in each case. (Note: the LT-5 engine used in the ZR-1 used a speed density system and continued to use that system in 1994 and 1995 since the engines had already been made prior to the last two years of production. The ZR-1 therefore has no MAF even after Corvette went back to the MAF based system).

Theory of Operation

As the air travels past the heated wire enroute to the intake manifold, it will cool the wire and additional current is added to again heat the wire to the design temperature. Since the amount of air moving past the sensor is directly related to the amount of cooling experienced by the heated wire, a feedback condition is established whereby the exact amount of moving air is directly related to the amount of current passing through the wire and the intake air is therefore precisely measured.

Once the amount of air is known, the computer controlling the engine can add or subtract fuel as required to maintain the magic 14.7:1 air-fuel mixture resulting in the cleanest burn possible from an emissions (pollution) standpoint.

It does this by varying the "on time" of the fuel injectors. The injectors are pulsed on and off and the width of the pulse is lengthened or shortened as required. When you first start a typical engine, the pulse width is around 4 milliseconds but as soon as the engine "catches" the pulse width is shortened to about 2.2 milliseconds for idle. During operation, the measured air flow through the MAF will cause the computer to increase or decrease the pulse width as explained above.

MAF Operating Conditions

The Bosch MAF is more complex than the AC/Delco version. Both measure the air flow but the Bosch MAF has a circuit called the 'burn-off circuit' that cycles on for about 2 seconds when you shut the engine down. This circuit heats the wire to a high enough temperature to burn off any residue that may have collected on the wire during operation. If you are in a quiet area, you can hear the relays click on and then off on a 1985-1989 C4 as the burn-off cycle occurs.

There are two relays involved with the Bosch MAF: A power relay that passes current to the MAF wire during normal operation and the burn-off relay that provides the current for the cleaning cycle. Both are located on the firewall in the engine compartment, just behind the battery on the drivers side. Bad MAF power and burn-off relays can cause hard starting problems and should be changed periodically as preventative measure and any time you experience hard starting conditions.

The AC/Delco MAF has a power relay but no burn-off relay. For this reason, you should pay even closer attention to the condition of your air filter on a later model C4 than normal since a contaminated wire in a AC/Delco MAF is going to stay contaminated for the most part and cause false signals to be passed to the computer.

Also, the Bosch MAF outputs its information as a analog signal to the computer but the AC/Delco sends its signal as a digital component of varying frequency. For this reason, you cannot measure it's operation directly.

A scan tool is generally the best way to troubleshoot engine problems and with the 1994 and later Corvette, it is virtually mandatory. (An oscilloscope will also work on the AC/Delco MAF but a regular test meter will not).

MAF Problems

Faulty MAF sensors will normally light the check engine light on the drivers information center if the problem is constant and store a trouble code. If intermittent, a trouble code will still be stored as long as the battery is not disconnected.

Normally, the problem is a poor connection at the sensor and wiggling the wires, unplugging and reinserting the connector will often cure the problem.

A faulty MAF will normally cause a no start or difficult start condition and although you can eventually get the car into the "limp-home" mode in most cases, you need to attend to the problem ASAP.

this flow chart might help

http://members.shaw.ca/corvette86/FuelSystemDiagnosis.pdf

AC/Delco sensors can become intermittent or give false readings if the wires become contaminated as explained above.

The MAF is a critical part of the emission control system and as such will cause the computer to react to problems very quickly, setting trouble codes and reducing performance in ways that cannot be ignored for long.

MAF Mods

The Bosch MAF is often modified by removing the two screens that are present in the front and rear of the cylinder. Removing these screens significantly increases the air flow through them and this results in more horsepower. Removing the screens is an old trick from the Corvette Challenge days in 1988 and 1989. It does work but is illegal in many states so be advised not to do anything that will get you arrested for a pollution violation.

The AC/Delco MAF is not readily modified. It is what it is but since it is a larger diameter than the Bosch, it responds well to changing the air filter to a free flowing type such as the K&N filter.
Welcome to C4 vette codes it is very ....repeat very
important that if you are not savvy of working on your
vette ...you would be better off - taking your car to a
dealership for repairs on your trouble codes.
However if you feel that you want to dive right in ..than you
have come to the right place.First locate your car's alcl
this component is located just below the instrument panel and
to the left of the center console. Remove the plastic cover
the first two slots to your right are the A & B slots for a drawing of
the alcl module's picture is added below.
The A slot is the diagnostic slot and the B slot is the ground
slot. insert the computer key into these slots (with the engine
off) this is very important...now only put the ignition key
to on ( not start !!!) the check engine light will display a
code 12 which is one flash followed by two flashes.
this code will be flashed three times ..followed by the
trouble code stored in your car's computer.
what ever the code is it will be flashed three times.
have a paper and pencil ready and write down the
code .

code 13 =1 flash followed by 3 flashes =>oxygen sensor
code 14 =1 flash followed by 4 flashes =>coolant sensor
code 15 =1 flash followed by 5 flashes =>coolant sensor
code 21 = 2 flashes followed by 1 flash =>throttle position sensor
code 22 = 2 flashes followed by 2 flashes=> throttle position sensor
code 23 = 2 flashes followed by 3 flashes=> manifold air temp sensor
code 24 = 2 flashes followed by 4 flashes=> vehicle speed sensor
code 25 = 2 flashes followed by 5 flashes=> manifold air temp sensor
code 32 =>egr system
code 33 =>map sensor
code 34 =>maf sensor
code 35 => idle air control
code 41 => cylinder select error
code 42 => electronic spark control
code 43 => electronic spark control
code 44 => lean exhaust
code 45 => rich exhaust
code 51 => PROM
code 52 => fuel calpak
code 53 => system over voltage
code 54 => fuel pump circuit
code 55 => ecm
code 62 => oil temp
please remember that if you have the computer key installed
in the alcl and you start the engine ( you will ruin the engine's computer
)
only put the ignition to on (not to start)
If you should get a check engine soon display.. you can use
the above procedure and codes to buy the right part
or at the very least to keep from getting taken for a ride
and be made to pay hight prices for some inexpensive
module that you could have installed yourself.
You never ask a barber if you need a haircut ..
so you have to be on guard they will see you comming
a mile away.
If your engine displays a trouble code ... your engine will
go into limp mode ..it will still run but very poorly.
you might be able to reset the computer if it will not start
( just to get home ) by disconnecting both battery cables
and re-installing them ...this is not recommended ..but if
you are stranded it might help unitl you get your car home
or to a repair shop..good luck

1985 TO 1991:

Code #12: Normal No Codes.
Code #13: Open Oxygen Sensor Circuit.
Code #14: Coolant Sensor Circuit Low.
Code #15: Coolant Sensor Circuit High.
Code #21: Throttle Position Sensor High.
Code #22: Throttle Position Sensor Low.
Code #23: Manifold Air Temperature Circuit High.
Code #24: Vehicle Speed Sensor.
Code #25: Manifold Air Temperature Circuit Low.
Code #32: EGR System Failure.
Code #33: Mass Air Flow Sensor High.
Code #34: Mass Air Flow Sensor Low.
Code #36: Mas Air Flow Sensor Burn-Off Function Fault.
Code #41: Cylinder Select Error.
Code #42: Electronic Spark Timing.
Code #43: Electronic Spark Control.
Code #44: Lean Exhaust indication.
Code #45: Rich Exhaust Indication.
Code #46: Vehicle Anti Theft Fault.
Code #51: Faulty Mem-Cal.
Code #52: Fuel Calpak Missing.
Code #52(1990-91 Corvette Only): Engine Oil Temperature Sensor Low.
Code #53: System Over Voltage.
Code #54: Fuel Pump Circuit Low Voltage.
Code #55: Defective ECM.
Code #62: Engine Oil Temperature Sensor Circuit High.

ECM CODES 1992 TO 1993:

Code #12: Normal No Codes.
Code #13: Left Oxygen Sensor Circuit.
Code #14: Coolant Temperature Sensor Circuit High.
Code #15: Coolant Temperature Sensor Circuit Low.
Code #16: Opti-Spark Ignition Timing System.( Low Pulse)
Code #21: Throttle Position Sensor Circuit High.
Code #22: Throttle Position Sensor Circuit Low.
Code #23: Intake Air Temperature Sensor Circuit Low.
Code #24: Vehicle Speed Sensor Circuit.
Code #25: Intake Temperature Sensor Circuit High.
Code #26: Quad-Driver Module #1 Circuit.
Code #27: Quad-Driver Module #2 Circuit.
Code #28: Quad-Driver Module #3 Circuit.
Code #32: Exhaust Gas Recirclation Circuit.
Code #33: Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor Circuit Low.
Code #34: Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor Circuit High.
Code #36: Opti-Spark Ignition Timing System. (High Resolution Pulse.)
Code #41: Electronic Spark Timing Circuit Open.
Code #42: Electronic Spark Timing Circuit Grounded.
Code# 43: Electronic Spark Control Circuit.
Code #44: Left Oxygen Sensor Circuit Lean.
Code #45: Left Oxygen Sensor Circuit Rich.
Code #51: Mem-Cal Error.
Code #52: Engine Oil Temperature Sensor Circuit Low.
Code #53: System Voltage.
Code #55: Fuel Lean Monitor.
Code #56: Vacuum Sensor Circuit.
Code #61: Secondary Port Throttle Valve System.
Code #62: Engine Oil Temperature Sensor Circuit High.
Code #63: Right Oxygen Sensor Circuit Open.
Code #64: Right Oxygen Sensor Circuit Lean.
Code #65: Right Oxygen Sensor Circuit Rich.
Code #66: A/C Pressure Sensor Circuit Open.
Code #67: A/C Pressure Sensor Circuit. (Sensor or A/C Clutch Circuit Problem)
Code #68: A/C Relay Circuit Shorted.
Code #69: A/C Clutch Circuit.
Code #72: Gear Selector Switch Circuit.




CODES 1994 TO 1996:

DTC #11: Malfunction Indicator Lamp Circuit.
DTC #13: Bank #1 Heated Oxygen Sensor #1 Circuit:
DTC #14: Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor Circuit Voltage Low.
DTC #15: Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor Circuit Voltage High.
DTC #16: Distributor Ignition System Low Pulse.
DTC #18: Injector Circuit.
DTC #21: Throttle Position Sensor Circuit Voltage High.
DTC #22: Throttle Position Sensor Circuit Voltage Low.
DTC #23: Intake Temperature Sensor Circuit Voltage High.
DTC #24: Vehicle Speed Sensor Circuit.
DTC #25: Intake Air Temperature Sensor Circuit Voltage Low.
DTC #26: Evaporative Emission Canister Purge Solenoid Valve Circuit.
DTC #27: EGR Vacuum Control Signal Solenoid Valve Circuit.
DTC #28: Transmission Range Pressure Switch Assembly Fault.
DTC #29: Secondary Air Injection Pump Circuit.
DTC #32: Exhaust Gas Recalculation.
DTC #33: Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor Circuit High.
DTC #34: Manifold Absolute Pressure Sensor Circuit Low.
DTC #36: Distributor Ignition System High Pulse.
DTC #37: Brake Switch Stuck On.
DTC #38: Brake Switch Stuck Off.
DTC #41: Ignition Control Circuit Open.
DTC #42: Ignition Control Circuit Shorted.
DTC #43: Knock Sensor Circuit.
DTC #44: Bank 1 LF Heated Oxygen Sensor #1 Circuit Lean.
DTC #45: Bank 1 LF Heated Oxygen Sensor #1 Circuit Rich.
DTC #47: Knock Sensor Circuit Or Module Missing.
DTC #48: Mass Air Flow Sensor Circuit.
DTC #50: System Voltage Low.
DTC #51: EEPROM Programming Error.
DTC #52: Engine Oil Temperature Sensor Circuit Voltage Low.
DTC #53: System Voltage Low.
DTC #55: Fuel Lean Monitor.
DTC #58: Transmission Fluid Temperature Sensor Circuit Low.
DTC #59: Transmission Fluid Temperature Sensor Circuit High.
DTC #62: Engine Oil Temperature Sensor Circuit Voltage Low.
DTC #63: Bank 2 RF Heated Oxygen Sensor #1 Circuit Open.
DTC #64: Bank 2 RF Heated Oxygen Sensor #1 Circuit Lean.
DTC #65: Bank 2 RF Heated Oxygen Sensor #1 Circuit Rich.
DTC #66: A/C Refrigerant Pressure Sensor Circuit Open.
DTC #67: A/C Pressure Sensor Circuit Sensor or A/C Clutch.
DTC #68: A/C Relay Circuit.
DTC #69: A /C Clutch Circuit.
DTC #70: A/C Clutch Relay Driver Circuit.
DTC #72: Vehicle Speed Sensor Loss.
DTC #73: Pressure Control Solenoid Circuit Current Error.
DTC #74: Traction Control System Circuit Low.
DTC #75: Transmission System Voltage Low
DTC #77: Primary Cooling Fan Relay Control Circuit.
DTC #78: Secondary Cooling Fan Relay Control Circuit.
DTC #79: Transmission Fluid Overtemp.
DTC #80: Transmission Component Slipping.
DTC #81: Transmission 2-3 Shift Solenoid Circuit.
DTC #82: Transmission 1-2 Shift Solenoid Circuit.
DTC #83: Torque Converter Solenoid Voltage High.
DTC #84: 3-2 Control Solenoid Circuit.(Auto Only).
DTC #84: 2nd And 3rd Gear Blockout Relay Control Circuit.
DTC #85: Transmission TCC Stock On.
DTC #90: Transmission TCC Solenoid Circuit.
DTC #91: One To Four Upshift Lamp(Manual Only).
DTC #97: VSS Output Circuit.
DTC #98: Tachometer Output Signal Voltage Wrong.
_________________you really can,t be effectively at playing mr-fix-it with out the correct tools

especially on the more modern cars that are computer controlled, the days of effectively tuning by ear and vacuum gauge and engine sound went out with carbs
you need a few basic tools, now the list will vary, but you can,t get by by guessing, you neet to know and test now that sensors and CPUs control engine function
heres some basic tools

be sure to get the specific manuals your car and EFI system and ignition system,require FIRST


https://www.etoolcart.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=4047


while it appears to be expensive, it saves you a good deal of money in the long run compared to dealing with the local chevy dealers mechanics, and makes diagnostics far faster, I bought this for the shop and it seems to be a good investment, since between a dealers diagnostics and swapping parts that don,t need changing you could easily spend close to that on just a few problems getting sorted out
youll also want a few basic diagnostic tools

https://www.etoolcart.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=4417

https://www.etoolcart.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=6688

https://www.etoolcart.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=2597

https://www.etoolcart.com/index.asp?PageAction=VIEWPROD&ProdID=8108

and a book or two

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0837608...ce&n=283155

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0879387...ce&n=283155

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/0760304...ce&n=283155

in no time youll be the area wizz kid on chevy injection diagnostics:thumbsup:


This is from http://shbox.com/

A fuel pressure test gauge can be bought at your local auto supply for ~$35. Attach it to the schrader valve that is on the fuel rail. Schrader valve location on 1994-1997

Normal pressure when the engine is not running and lines have been pressurized is 41-47 psi. This same pressure should be observed at wide open throttle (WOT). WOT can be simulated by removing the vacuum hose to the regulator at idle. At idle (because of the effect of the vacuum to the regulator) pressure will be less than what you observe with the vacuum line off. There may be anything from a 3 to 10 psi difference. NOTE: any indication of fuel in the vacuum line to the regulator, means the regulator is leaking and should be replaced. Check the line for fuel or the smell of fuel.
To fully determine that you don't have a pressure drop off during actual WOT situations, you should tape the gauge to your windshield and take it for a test run. This will tell you if the pump can meet actual fuel flow demands at pressure and not just at a simulated WOT condition (as when removing the vacuum to the regulator).
When you have a gauge connected and the pressure looks initially good and then bleeds off quickly when you shut the engine off, you can do a couple of tests to help you figure out where the pressure loss is.
What the factory manual says to temporarily install, is a set of "fuel line shut off adapters" (probably something the normal guy is not going to have available). You remove the fuel lines from the rail and connect these valves in between. This lets you shut off either side of the lines for testing.
You can do the same thing by pinching the flexible lines to shut them off, but risk breaking them. You might be able to do it (your risk) by using a needle nose vise grips and putting some scrap hose as cushions on the jaws. Then use that to clamp off the line just enough to seal it. Obviously, this is not the best way to shut off the lines and could result in breakage. Heat and age can make the hoses brittle. If you don't want to risk it, don't. It's just a suggestion.
You can use the fuel pump prime connector for pressurizing the system (jumper 12v to it to run the pump).
Watch your gauge as you jumper the prime connector. When you have good pressure remove the jumper and clamp off (or use shut off valve) the fuel supply line (3/8 pipe). If pressure holds, you have a leak on the feed line somewhere before it gets to the clamp (or shut off valve) or at the check ball in the pump. If it still goes down, release your clamp (or open shut off valve). Pressurize the system again, then remove the jumper and this time clamp (or shut off) the return line (5/16 line). If pressure holds, then the regulator is faulty. If pressure does not hold, you need to locate leaky injector(s). If you can't tell a leaky injector from reading the plugs, you can look and see if injectors are leaking by removing the fuel rail screws and pull the rail and all the injectors up, so you can see under them. Leave them over the injector ports. Pressurized the system and look under the injectors to see if any are dripping.
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: C4 sensor info

Postby grumpyvette » November 29th, 2008, 11:34 am

How to Set Minimum Idle on your C4

--------------------------------------------------------------------------------

How to Adjust your Early C4 TPS and Idle Speed -- 1 of 1
Date Published: 2001-10-01

Submitter's Name: Lars Grimsrud
Email Address: lars.grimsrud@lmco.com

How to Adjust your Early C4 TPS and Idle Speed by Lars Grimsrud SVE Automotive Restoration Musclecar, Collector & Exotic Auto Repair & Restoration Broomfield, CO
Rev. New 6-15-00
This tech paper will discuss the procedure for correct adjustment of the Minimum Idle Speed and for adjustment of the Throttle Position Switch (TPS) on the early C4 Corvette TPI systems.

These steps apply specifically to the 1985 model year, and in general to other years. Later model years do not have adjustable TPS's. General Idle speed and off-idle throttle response on the early TPI systems is determined by correct adjustment of the minimum idle speed screw combined with a correct setting of the TPS.

I've seen many of these cars that have had their idle speed corrected by well-intentioned mechanics and owners by simply screwing the minimum idle speed screw in a few turns. This really messes up the settings, and will not make your car perform properly. Doing a correct setup of the TPS is one of the easiest ways to make your car feel and respond better. To maximize the benefit of this procedure, I recommend that you first remove your Throttle Body (TB), disassemble it (it's incredibly easy, there are a total of about 5 pieces in it), clean the TB up really good with some spray carb cleaner, and put it back together.

A nice clean TB will really put an edge on the performance improvement you will get by doing this procedure. The Service Manual has instructions for doing these operations, but the directions are scattered through several sections of the Manual.

Here is the complete, step-by-step process for doing this (not including TB rebuild). All specs and steps are taken directly from the Manual (all 3 different sections), and this process is absolutely correct.

Tools & Equipment You will need the following tools and equipment:
1. A set of Torx wrenches. You can buy a complete set in a nice, genuine plastic pouch at Sears.
2. A good digital voltmeter that will read voltages less than 1 volt.
3. A paper clip.
4. A small screwdriver.


Procedure
There are two electrical components on the TB that you will be working with: The TPS and the Idle Air Control Valve (IAC).

Make sure that the connectors for these two components are easily accessible and that you can easily disconnect the IAC.

You will also be playing with the diagnostic connector under the dash. Remove the cover (if it's still in place). Bend your paper clip into a U shape. You will be playing with the two top right hand terminals (A and B) in the connector.
First step is to set the minimum idle speed. If nobody has messed with this on your car before, the set screw will be covered by a pressed-in plug. It's located on the driver's side of the TB. Remove this plug if it's there.
With the IAC connected and the ignition OFF, stick the paper clip into the diagnostic connector from A to B. This grounds the diagnostic lead.
Turn the ignition to the ON position without starting the engine. Wait 30 seconds.
Now, with the ignition still in the ON position, disconnect the IAC connector at the IAC.
Remove the paper clip from the diagnostic connector.
Start the engine and allow it to reach normal operating temperature. The idle speed will probably be really low, and you may have to coax the engine a bit with the gas pedal to keep it running for a while.
If your car is an automatic, set the parking brake and put the transmission in DRIVE. If your car is a manual, leave it in neutral. · Adjust the idle speed screw to obtain 400 rpm in drive or 450 in neutral.
Shut off the engine and re-connect the IAC. That's it for idle speed.

Now on to the TPS.

There are 3 wires stacked vertically on the TPS. You will need to be able to measure the voltage between the two top wires. You can either buy a special harness connector that breaks these wires out (from Mid America), or gently pierce the insulation of the wires with the pointy prongs on your volt meter. You can also stick a paper clip into each of the two top locations of the connector and clamp onto the paper clips to measure the voltage. Whatever is easiest for you.

Turn the ignition to the ON position without starting the engine.
Loosen the TPS Torx adjustment screws. · Set your volt meter to a low scale DC volt setting that will accurately read less than 1 volt.
Measure the voltage between the two top TPS wires.
Adjust the TPS by rotating its position until you get a reading of .54 volts.
Tighten the Torx screws and recheck the voltage. Re-adjust if necessary to make sure voltage is right at .54.
Turn the ignition OFF. You are now in perfect adjustment on idle speed and TPS output.

Start the engine. It may take a few seconds for the car to catch on to its new settings.

this infos bound to be helpful at times
Sensor Locations

Sensor
Location

Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor. Front of engine, below Throttle Body.
Engine Oil Temperature Sensor. Left rear of engine, just above the oil filter.
Oil Pressure Sender/Switch. Top, left hand rear of engine.
Fuel Quantity Sender. Top of fuel tank, beneath filler pipe escutcheon panel.
MAT (Manifold Absolute Temperature Sensor). Underside of manifold air plenum at rear.
Outside Temperature Sensor. Right side of engine, top right corner of radiator.
In Car Temp Temperature Sensor. Coupe: above left seat near interior courtesy light, Convertible: center of cargo compartment lid.
MAF (Mass Air Flow) Sensor. Front of engine ahead of throttle body.
Oxygen (O2) Sensor. Left side of engine, in exhaust pipe.
TPS (Throttle Position Sensor). Right side of throttle body at the front.


Sensor Outputs:

Sensor
Measured Value

Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor. 185 Ohms @ 210F, 3400 Ohms @ 68F, 7,500 Ohms @ 39 F.
Engine Oil Temperature Sensor. 185 Ohms @ 210 F, 3400 Ohms @ 68 F, 7,500 Ohms @39 F.
Oil Pressure Sender/Switch. 1 Ohms @ 0 PSI, 43 Ohms @ 30 PSI, 86 Ohms @ 60 PSI.
Fuel Quantity Sender. 0 Ohms @ Empty, 45 Ohms @ 1/2 Full, 90 Ohms @ Full.
MAT (Manifold Absolute Temperature Sensor). 185 Ohms @ 210 F, 3400 Ohms @ 70 F, 15,000 Ohms @ 40 F.
Outside Temperature Sensor. 4400 Ohms @ 60 F, 2200 Ohms @ 85 F.
In Car Temp Temperature Sensor. 4400 Ohms @ 60 F, 2200 Ohms @ 85 F.
MAF (Mass Air Flow) Sensor. .4 Volts @ idle, 5 Volts @ Full Throttle.
Oxygen (O2) Sensor. .1 Volt Lean Mixture, .9 Volt Rich Mixture.
TPS (Throttle Position Sensor). .54 Volts Idle, ~ 5 Volts Full Throttle.
grumpyvette is online now Report Post IP Edit/Delete Message
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: C4 sensor info

Postby grumpyvette » November 29th, 2008, 11:37 am

IAC and TPS Adjustment
FROM THIRDGEN.org

http://www.thirdgen.org/tpimod2

Tom Keliher Mar 31 2006 - 8:07pm
Idle Air Control
Tools needed:

Torx bit # T-20
Paper Clip
Small Punch

Take the paper clip and open it up and form it into a big "U" shape. Insert the clip ends into the ALDL in the 'A' and 'B' pins.

Turn on the ignition, but don't start the engine. Wait 30 seconds. Now, go remove the connector from the IAC.

Start engine. You are now going to adjust "minimum air". There is a Torx screw on the side of the throttle body. This is what needs to be turned to adjust minimum air, or more commonly known as "idle speed". It comes from the factory with a protective metal cap over it. If the cap is still there, use a small punch to knock it out. Set the idle speed to 450 rpm, rotating the Torx screw clockwise to raise rpm, and counter-clockwise to lower rpm. Once the idle rpm is set, turn off the engine.

Re-connect the connector onto the IAC. Start engine. Idle speed is now once again governed by the ECM, but your idle should be smooth and steady, approximately 600 rpm in Drive (for unmodified cars).

If you set an SES light by having the IAC disconnected, then after shutting down the engine disconnect the negative battery terminal. Wait 5 minutes. This will clear the ECM of all trouble codes. Re-connect the battery and drive the car for 20 minutes to allow the ECM to relearn your driving style.

Throttle Position Switch (TPS)
Tools needed:

Digital Volt-Ohm-Meter (VOM)
Jumper Wires (make your own)
Auto Xray Scanner (if available) will eliminate the need for VOM and jumper wires.

Turn on ignition, but don't start the engine.

With a scanner: plug in the scanner and read the TPS voltage. It should be 0.54Volts +/- 0.075Volts

With VOM and jumper wires: disconnect the connector from the TPS. Using your jumper wires, make a connection allowing some room for the VOM terminals to contact the jumper leads and read the TPS voltage.

If out of spec, loosen the two screws holding the TPS to the throttle body, and slightly rotate the TPS up or down, reading the voltage until it comes into specification. Tighten screws. Using the throttle lever, rotate the throttle to WOT (wide open throttle). The TPS voltage should be over 4.0 volts. Close the throttle again, and then slowly open it to WOT, observing the voltage reading. It should increase progressively and in a linear fashion. If it sticks or jumps or falls off at all while doing this check, that could mean a bad TPS switch and could be a cause of stumbling and driveability problems.

After setting the correct voltage, turn off ignition switch. Remove jumpers/scanner and reconnect the TPS connector as required.
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Posts: 14105
Joined: September 14th, 2008, 1:40 pm
Location: florida

Re: C4 sensor info

Postby grumpyvette » January 15th, 2009, 2:01 pm

tired of your C4 corvette running hot?
vacume diagrams and other useful info

http://www.autozone.com/addVehicleId,11 ... 528008fdc3

http://www.ecklers.com/product.asp?pf_i ... pt_id=1127

http://www.ecklers.com/product.asp?pf_i ... pt_id=1126

http://www.autoenginuity.com/

http://vettaid.com/default.aspx?cid=RECSOtkYNdo=
Image
Image
Intake Air Temp sensor. It is located on the bottom of the inlet plenum a few inches ahead of the distributor. It is like right next to the fuel pressure regulator., it can effect fuel flow rates,The ignition control module in the distributor is another item that normally fails when hot, that needs to be replaced is you suspect its defective

low temp sensor
http://www.ecklers.com/product.asp?pf_i ... pt_id=1252

installation instructions
http://www.ecklers.com/assets/pdf/40415.pdf?


btw,theres lots of guys that spend days trying to stop leaks the the threads or connection plumbing on those oil pressure sensors on the rear of the block near the distributor , fixing leaks on those sensors, all to no gain, simply because its RARELY the threads that leak, its commonly the sending unit itself that defective and leaking internally,or externally, swap it out and when you install the new version coat the threads lightly with high temp silicone


IF you need to pull trouble codes, heres a similar post on that subject, and some useful threads

http://www.tmart.com/ELM327-U-Type-Interface-Bluetooth-OBDII-Auto-Car-Diagnostic-Scan-Tool_p187991.html
a cheap code reader tools useful
read thru these threads below

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=32&t=2697

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=32&t=302

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=50&t=8136&p=28925&hilit=aldl+scan#p28925

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=2&t=3074&p=8155&hilit=aldl+scan#p8155

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=32&t=1401

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=32&t=596

1963SS wrote:How about this? Pins "A" and "B" are the upper right two pins on your ALDL viewed from the driver's seat. Paper clip works great.

Pin "B" is the diagnostic enable pin and pin "A" is ground. Grounding pin "B" to enable the diagnostic readout of the ECM/PCM.

To recover the codes, short pins "A" and "B" together using a small section of electrical wire or paper clip.

With the ignition turned OFF, short pins "A" and "B" on the ALDL.

Turn IGN ON (but not to RUN).

The "Check Engine" light (early C4s) or "SYS" light (later C4s) will flash a Code 12 (a single flash followed by two flashes) and will repeat three times (Flash (pause) Flash Flash (long pause), Flash (pause) Flash Flash (long pause), Flash (pause) Flash Flash (long pause).

Code 12 is a delimiter or marker code to show where the error code string begins and ends.

After the three Code 12 flashes, you will either get an error code (or codes) or you will get another string of Code 12 flashes if there are no trouble codes stored.

All codes are repeated three times with a long pause between each code group (36 or Flash Flash Flash pause followed by six flashes, repeated three times, folowed by a long pause with any additional codes stored then flashed).

The "Check Engine/System" light on with engine running means the condition(s) are currently present. If the light is not on during RUN operation, the limits were exceeded at some point in time and the event was recorded in memory, but the reading has since returned to the normal operating range.

Remember to remove the shorting device from the connector after you have read the codes.

Clearing the Codes

To clear the codes from memory, remove the negative battery cable for a minimum of 10 seconds.

Disconnecting the battery will clear all stored codes and and any stored memory (radio button presets, clock, trip odometer, average gas mileage memory, power seats). Your ECM/PCM computer will also have to relearn timing/mixture/exhaust emissions.

Make absolutely certain the ignition key is turned OFF. If you connect the battery with the ignition switch ON, you can destroy the ECM/PCM module.
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Posts: 14105
Joined: September 14th, 2008, 1:40 pm
Location: florida

Re: C4 sensor and relay/switch locations and info

Postby grumpyvette » June 23rd, 2009, 3:05 pm

http://www.corvettebuyers.com/c4vettes/ ... mation.htm
EMISSION COMPONENT LOCATIONS
Image
Sensor


Measured Value
Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor. 185 Ohms @ 210F, 3400 Ohms @ 68F, 7,500 Ohms @ 39 F.
Engine Oil Temperature Sensor. 185 Ohms @ 210 F, 3400 Ohms @ 68 F, 7,500 Ohms @39 F.
Oil Pressure Sender/Switch. 1 Ohms @ 0 PSI, 43 Ohms @ 30 PSI, 86 Ohms @ 60 PSI.
Fuel Quantity Sender. 0 Ohms @ Empty, 45 Ohms @ 1/2 Full, 90 Ohms @ Full.
MAT (Manifold Absolute Temperature Sensor). 185 Ohms @ 210 F, 3400 Ohms @ 70 F, 15,000 Ohms @ 40 F.
Outside Temperature Sensor. 4400 Ohms @ 60 F, 2200 Ohms @ 85 F.
In Car Temp Temperature Sensor. 4400 Ohms @ 60 F, 2200 Ohms @ 85 F.
MAF (Mass Air Flow) Sensor. .4 Volts @ idle, 5 Volts @ Full Throttle.
Oxygen (O2) Sensor. .1 Volt Lean Mixture, .9 Volt Rich Mixture.
TPS (Throttle Position Sensor). .54 Volts Idle, ~ 5 Volts Full Throttle.

Sensor Locations

Sensor


Location
Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor. Front of engine, below Throttle Body.
Engine Oil Temperature Sensor. Left rear of engine, just above the oil filter.
Oil Pressure Sender/Switch. Top, left hand rear of engine.
Fuel Quantity Sender. Top of fuel tank, beneath filler pipe escutcheon panel.
MAT (Manifold Absolute Temperature Sensor). Underside of manifold air plenum at rear.
Outside Temperature Sensor. Right side of engine, top right corner of radiator.
In Car Temp Temperature Sensor. Coupe: above left seat near interior courtesy light, Convertible: center of cargo compartment lid.
MAF (Mass Air Flow) Sensor. Front of engine ahead of throttle body.
Oxygen (O2) Sensor. Left side of engine, in exhaust pipe.
TPS (Throttle Position Sensor). Right side of throttle body at the front.

you really need a scan tool of some sort to work on corvettes

http://www.gosale.com/4924033/actron-cp ... 2godkQqywQ

at about $140 its certainly affordable, but its basically a deluxe code reader



http://stores.channeladvisor.com/Summit ... ms/BBE-ATU

this seems to be a better deal, at $199

http://www.etoolcart.com/autoxray-scann ... x6000.aspx

this is what I bought,(about $400) but mines several years old and theres even better ones out there now


The factory shop manuals are available from Helm, Inc. The following links will take you to the correct location for all years of C4 Vettes. OWNING A FACTORY SHOP MANUAL ,AND A FEW BASIC DIAGNOSTIC TOOLS IS MANDATORY IF YOU INTEND TO ISOLATE AND REPAIR A CORVETTE



1984

1984 Factory Service Manual


1985
1985 Factory Service Manual


1986

1986 Factory Service Manual


1987

1987 Factory Service Manual


1988

1988 Factory Service Manual


1989

1989 Factory Service Manual


1990 (Separate ZR-1 (LT5) Manuals are sometimes listed from 1990 thru 1994)

1990 Factory Service Manual


1991

1991 Factory Service Manual


1992

1992 Factory Service Manual


1993

1993 Factory Service Manual


1994

1994 Factory Service Manual


1995 (No separate ZR-1 Service Manual)

1995 Factory Service Manual


1996

1996 Factory Service Manual
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

User avatar
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Site Admin
 
Posts: 14105
Joined: September 14th, 2008, 1:40 pm
Location: florida

Re: C4 sensor and relay/switch locations and info

Postby grumpyvette » June 3rd, 2010, 10:26 pm

CHECK ALL YOUR FUSES and electrical connections WITH A MULTI METER, but don,t assume you know what the problem is, let the facts lead you to the answers
be aware that not all engine "MISSES" or "ticking sounds " that you might be dealing with or trying to correct, are an electrical or a fuel delivery or pressure issue, your problem might be a mechanical issue like a vacuum leak, from a busted hose,or loose gasket,a burnt valve, loose or worn timing chain,badly adjusted valves, broken or loose harmonic damper, loose flex plate, or torque converter bolt, busted valve spring, burnt or defective rocker, loose or worn valve guide, or a dozen other issues so try to logically isolate it to a cylinder or system, electrical,valve train, fuel delivery, exhaust , ignition ,etc.


Image
http://www.harborfreight.com/5-in-1-dig ... 98674.html
having a wide assortment of different multi meter test leads available is a huge benefit while testing
the clip test leads that test thru a wires insulation without much damage are a big help


Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
Image
THE DIAGRAM ABOVE HAS THE CORRECT WIRE COLORS
Image
#
http://shbox.com/1/4th_gen_tech2.html

Cooling System Operation and Testing

http://www.aa1car.com/library/electric_cooling_fan.htm

http://www.aa1car.com/library/air_temp_sensors.htm

http://www.aa1car.com/library/cooling_f ... oblems.htm

http://www.aa1car.com/library/coolant_sensors.htm

http://www.aa1car.com/library/overheat.htm

Electric cooling fans attached to the radiator keep the LT1 from overheating when there is little or no air passing through the radiator core (car going very slow or stopped and engine running). It is normal for the temps on the gauge to go up to the middle or past middle of the gauge before the fans kick on. The middle of the gauge is in the range of 210º - 220º. With factory programming, the PCM will command low speed fans (or primary fan) "ON" at 226º and "OFF" at 221º and high speed fans (or secondary fan) "ON" at 235º and "OFF" at 230º. The fans should come on before it gets to any part of the red zone. (see "dual fan configuration" below about primary and secondary fans)
The f-body LT1 uses a 180° thermostat as stock.

The PCM gets it's temp readings from a sensor that is in the water pump. If the reading the PCM receives is inaccurate, the fans may not come on at the correct time. The PCM also uses this temperature for lookup in fuel calculation tables. If there is a problem that causes the reading to be always low (cold), the PCM will add extra fuel. This can cause hard starting when warm and an overly rich condition when running.

The gauge gets it's information from a sensor that is in the driver's side head. Inaccurate gauge readings can be from this sensor or it's wiring (the wire burned on a header pipe is common). The temp that the PCM sees can be monitored with a scan tool and compared to the gauge reading. They should be close, but don't expect them to be "perfectly" synchronized.

The fans are programmed to come on when the a/c is turned on. A/c Pressure monitoring sensors feed the PCM info and depending on the situation, the PCM may command the fans off for brief periods. Also, when the car reaches sustained higher speeds, the fans may be commanded off so incoming air can flow through the radiator unimpeded and provide the cooling needed.

Fans will also come on when the SES lamp comes on. The PCM does this when certain (most) DTCs are detected to protect the engine from a situation where it may overheat.


There are two versions of the dual fan configuration:

# 1993-1994 - Primary and Secondary fans that operate at only one speed. When initially commanded on, only the primary fan (driver side) comes on. It operates alone at full speed. If the temp threshold is met for addtional cooling, the secondary fan (passenger side) also is commanded on. At this point, both fans are running at full speed.
These fans use a two relay architecture that can be seen in the fuse/relay panel that is under the hood.

# In late 1994 and into 1995, there was a change to low and high speed fans. When initially commanded on, both fans will come on at a low speed. When the high speed temp threshold is met, they both bump up to high speed. A three relay architecture is used for this fan version (seen in the fuse/relay panel). By adding a third relay, low speed can be achieved by running the power to the fans in series. This way, each fan does not get full voltage and runs at a slower speed. High speed happens when the relays switch to provide full voltage to both fans. Low speed is less noisy and should result in greater fan longevity. High speed is not always needed.


2 Relay System PCM Commanded Fan Operation PCM Wire Color Grounded Fan Operation Relay Operated
#1 #2 #3
Primary@226º Drk Grn @A11 Primary (LH) fan full speed X - n/a
Secondary@235º Drk Blu @A10 Secondary (RH) fan full speed X X n/a
3 Relay System Low Speed@226º Drk Grn @A11 Low Speed (both fans) X - -
High Speed@235º Drk Blu @A10 High Speed (both fans) X X X
For both fans to operate in either system, both relay leads must be grounded. Grounding only the Drk Blu wire will result in only the RH fan operating at high speed.



Here are some fairly simple things to check for various complaints:

~Fans are not operational at any time~


# Check fan fuses in the underhood fuse/relay panel
# Check fan relays (same location). Aside from getting out any electrical equipment to test the relay, you can swap it with another one (such as the fog lamp relay) and test for function. See if the relay works for the fog lamps and/or the swapped-in relay makes your fans work. Nearly all the relays in the panel are the same, except for maybe the ABS relay.
# You can jumper two pins on the DLC that should cause the fans to come on. 1993-1994 cars with the 12 pin DLC can jumper pins A and B. On a 1993, that is the same way that you would retrieve trouble codes from the ecm. The 1994 won't give you any codes, but the fans will engage. 1995-1997 uses pins 5 and 6 on the 16 pin DLC to initiate what is called "field service enable mode". That will cause the fans to come on and operate most sensors for sanity checking. After placing the jumper on the correct pins, turn the key to ON (don't start). If the fans work after jumpering the DLC, your PCM is capable of operating the fans and all fan wiring/relays should be ok.
# Deeper problems can be solved through testing and using the wiring schematic.


~Fans don't come on except when the a/c or SES is on~

~Temp gauge continues to rise with no automatic fan operation~


# With a scan tool, check to see what temp the PCM is seeing from the sensor in the water pump. Make sure you are aware of the temps the fans come on (stated in the beginning of this article). If the temp it sees is incorrectly low, it won't know to turn the fans on. Another possibility is that the temp is really ok, but the gauge is reading wrong. That is why you need to use the scan tool to see and compare the readings. Info on testing wiring and sensor can be found here.
# If that looks ok, then your PCM may have issues. You could always try resetting the PCM by pulling the PCM BAT fuse for about 30 seconds.

Testing the ECT (Engine Temperature) Sensors and Connections

Image

ECT Temperature vs. Resistance Values

ºC ºF Ohms
100 212 177
90 194 241
80 176 332
70 158 467
60 140 667
50 122 973
45 113 1188
40 104 1459
35 95 1802
30 86 2238
25 77 2796
20 68 3520
15 59 4450
10 50 5670
5 41 7280
0 32 9420
-5 23 12300
-10 14 16180
-15 5 21450
-20 -4 28680
-30 -22 52700
-40 -40 100700

Use a Digital Volt Meter (DVM) set to ohms to measure resistance. Note: Use a high impedance meter (at least 10 megohm) when dealing with the PCM. Most modern DVMs will do, but your old analog meter can damage the PCM. It is also a good idea to get a " reference" from the meter you are working with. With the DVM on the ohms scale, touch the two meter leads together and note the ohm reading. It may not always be perfectly zero, but may be within a tenth or two. Now when you take an ohm reading, you will know what the meter will show when there is really no resistance.

* The sensor in the head has only one terminal. This sensor is for the temperature indicator on the dashboard. Place one test lead on the sensor terminal and the other on a known good ground. Compare the reading to the table. If your car is cold from sitting overnight, the reading should be close to ambient temperature.
* The sensor in the water pump has two terminals. This sensor is for the temperature input to the PCM. Place a test lead on each of the sensor terminals to take the reading. (When reading resistance, it does not matter which lead goes to which terminal)

If the sensor seems to be ok, you may also need to test at the harness connector for proper lead conditions. Use your test meter set on the dc voltage scale to do this. You will need the key in the RUN position, but don't have to start the car.

* For the one lead connector at the head, place the red test lead on the connector terminal and the black test lead to a known good ground. With the key ON, you should read battery voltage (+12vdc or close to it). You can also ground the lead and see if the gauge in the car deflects to full hot.
o If you get no voltage, switch the meter to ohms to see if the lead is grounded.
o No voltage or no ground mean that the lead is open.
o If the gauge is at full hot all the tme, the lead is grounded back toward the gauge. It could be possible for the lead to be pinched and grounded toward the gauge and broken and open back toward the sensor (like in the case of the wire getting caught somewhere during some major engine work). Physically tracing the wire from the sensor into the harness should locate the problem.
* The two lead connector at the water pump has a black (ground) lead and a PCM +5vdc power lead (probably yellow). Place the black meter test lead to black connector lead and the red meter test lead to the other connector lead (yellow on my 1995). You should read +5vdc because this is monitoring voltage being supplied from the PCM.
* If you get no reading:
o Test the yellow lead by placing the DVM red lead on it and the DVM black lead to ground. A +5vdc reading will indicate the lead is ok.
+ If you get no voltage, switch the meter to ohms to see if the lead is grounded.
+ No voltage or no ground mean that the lead is open.
o You can test the black connector lead by using the ohms scale on the DVM. Place the DVM black lead to ground. Place the DVM red lead to the black lead of the connector. If the lead is ok, you will get an ohm reading close to zero. If you get no reading or a very high one, the lead is open or partially open.
* OBD-I DTCs 14 and 15 or OBD-II DTCs P0117 and P0118 are typically associated with problems the PCM sees with the sensors or circuits.

Footnote: If you ever have to test the IAT, it operates the same as the two lead coolant sensor. The same temp vs. resistance table above is applicable to the IAT, as well as the +5vdc lead and ground wire at the harness connector.
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
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Re: C4 sensor and relay/switch locations and info

Postby grumpyvette » September 9th, 2010, 1:02 pm

oxygen sensor related info
http://www.chevythunder.com/Flow%20chart%20index.htm

http://www.chevythunder.com/fuel%20inje ... pg%20B.htm

viewtopic.php?f=32&t=1401

viewtopic.php?f=44&t=987&p=2395&hilit=intermitant#p2395

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Oxygen (O2) Sensor. .1 Volt Lean Mixture, .9 Volt Rich Mixture.
it helps if you understand that oxygen sensors do not measure your true fuel air ratio,entering the engine, but instead measure the remaining oxygen content of the burnt exhaust gases,and there are both narrow and wide band sensors
Image
Image

there have always been 2 on those.... the right side is not as visible...

these are delco part numbers.... at a dealer they will have a different part number for them to use.. but it will have the AFS numbers on the bag also...

SENSOR ASM,OXY
Part Number: 213-3857
Product Notes:
[Oxygen Sensor]; Universal Upstream
Per Vehicle: 2; Years: 1984-1991
Vehicle List

SENSOR ASM,EXH OXY
Part Number: AFS21
Product Notes:
[Heated Oxygen Sensor (Position 1)]; In exh manifold/crossover ; Type #21
Per Vehicle: 2; Years: 1988-1991
Vehicle List
CORVETTE(10) 1982-1992
1992 V8-350ci 5.7L F/I Vin P
1991 V8-350ci 5.7L F/I Vin 8
1990 V8-350ci 5.7L F/I Vin 8
1989 V8-350ci 5.7L F/I Vin 8
1988 V8-350ci 5.7L F/I Vin 8
1987 V8-350ci 5.7L F/I Vin 8
1986 V8-350ci 5.7L F/I Vin 8
1985 V8-350ci 5.7L F/I Vin 8
1984 V8-350ci 5.7L F/I Vin 8
1982 V8-350ci 5.7L F/I Vin 8
CORVETTE LT1(1) 1993-1993
1993 V8-350ci 5.7L F/I Vin P

SENSOR ASM,EXH OXY
Part Number: AFS22
Product Notes:
[Heated Oxygen Sensor (Position 1)]; In exh manifold/crossover ; Type #21
Per Vehicle: 2; Years: 1988-1991

CORVETTE(14) 1980-1992
1992 V8-350ci 5.7L F/I Vin P
1991 V8-350ci 5.7L F/I Vin 8
1990 V8-350ci 5.7L F/I Vin 8
1989 V8-350ci 5.7L F/I Vin 8
1988 V8-350ci 5.7L F/I Vin 8
1987 V8-350ci 5.7L F/I Vin 8
1986 V8-350ci 5.7L F/I Vin 8
1985 V8-350ci 5.7L F/I Vin 8
1984 V8-350ci 5.7L F/I Vin 8
1982 V8-350ci 5.7L F/I Vin 8
1981 V8-350ci 5.7L 4 BBL Vin 6
1980 V8-305ci 5.0L 4 BBL Vin H
1980 V8-350ci 5.7L 4 BBL Vin 6
1980 V8-350ci 5.7L 4 BBL Vin 8
CORVETTE LT1(1) 1993-1993


http://www.corvettebuyers.com/c4vettes/ ... mation.htm

C4 Sensor Information

http://www.aa1car.com/library/air_temp_sensors.htm

The C4 Corvette makes use of numerous sensors that feed information to the ECM/PCM (Electronic Control Module/Powertrain Control Module) and to the instruments on the dashboard.

Even if the sensor is operated by vacuum or pressure, the output is converted into an electrical signal for processing by the ECM.

Most faulty sensors will cause a trouble code to be set (resulting in a 'Check Engine/SYS ' Light) and also alter the performance of the automobile.

When troubleshooting the reason for the code, the normal approach is to go straight to the sensor and assume that it is faulty.

While this may be the normal practice, you are strongly cautioned that it is seldom the sensor but rather a connector, a power problem or a grounding issue that is actually causing the problem.

Or, the sensor may simply be doing it's job and reporting an occurrence that is at variance with what is allowed or expected by the ECM/PCM.

In any event, because the sensor really is the easiest thing to check, the following information is provided to assist you in determining if the device is operating properly.

You will need a D-VOM (Digital Volt-Ohm Meter) to check the items below. It should have at least a 10 megohms per volt rating---something that will be shown in the specifications.

For those sensors listed below that have ohms listed as the measurement item, disconnect the negative battery terminal and then the sensor harness connector and measure the sensor's terminals.

For voltage measurements, you can obtain test harnesses from any of the Corvette specialty catalog houses.

Before beginning your efforts, print the ECM codes page along with this page so you can cross reference the code information with the sensor information.

Sensor Outputs:
If your having issues with a temp gauge not reading correctly the first thing you need to find out is that you need to know the correct sensors ohms resistance value for a given heat level and what the gauge is expecting to see.,if the sensors providing the gauge with the wrong resistance the gauge will show the wrong temp indication, heres a typical sensor
Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor. 185 Ohms @ 210F, 3400 Ohms @ 68F, 7,500 Ohms @ 39 F.
but its far from rare to find a sensor that has wildly different ohms values, at different temperatures, depending on the manufacturer and intended application, or to have a defective sensor that only randomly changes resistance,
an INFRARED TEMP GUN AND A MULTI METER CAN BE USED TO VERIFY SENSOR OUTPUT

If you buy a MULTI METER< CODE SCANNER AND SHOP MANUAL YOU CAN GET MUCH BETTER AT FINDING AND FIXING PROBLEMS IF YOU then try disconnecting a few sensors and USE THE SCANNER TOO see if the scanner indicates the problem correctly
while you do the testing on the disconnected sensors take notes,and also use a multi meter to test voltage and ohms resistance on connectors and sensors,having listed the results on correctly working and disconnected sensors, and having been listed what the voltage and resistance and trouble codes that result from that testing will come in very handy later as a reference


RELATED LINKS

viewtopic.php?f=80&t=728&p=1025&hilit=sensors+camaro#p1025

viewtopic.php?f=32&t=2697&p=29270&hilit=multi+meter#p29270

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=609&p=810&hilit=multi+meter#p810

viewtopic.php?f=32&t=1401&p=3104&hilit=multi+meter#p3104

http://www.eficonnection.com/eficonnection/default.aspx

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=609&p=1298&hilit=multi+meter#p1298

viewtopic.php?f=44&t=469&p=7163&hilit=multi+meter#p7163

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=3110&p=8302&hilit=multi+meter#p8302

viewtopic.php?f=36&t=317&p=13210&hilit=multi+meter#p13210

viewtopic.php?f=87&t=5492&p=16502&hilit=multi+meter#p16502
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Sensor
Image

Measured Value
Image
Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor. 185 Ohms @ 210F, 3400 Ohms @ 68F, 7,500 Ohms @ 39 F.
Engine Oil Temperature Sensor. (lower sensor above oil filter) 185 Ohms @ 210 F, 3400 Ohms @ 68 F, 7,500 Ohms @39 F.
Image
some early c4 vettes have the gauge and oil pressure switch on an adapter near the distributor base into the block
Image
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Oil Pressure Sender/Switch. (top sensor in picture above) 1 Ohms @ 0 PSI, 43 Ohms @ 30 PSI, 86 Ohms @ 60 PSI.
Fuel Quantity Sender. 0 Ohms @ Empty, 45 Ohms @ 1/2 Full, 90 Ohms @ Full.
MAT (Manifold Absolute Temperature Sensor). 185 Ohms @ 210 F, 3400 Ohms @ 70 F, 15,000 Ohms @ 40 F.
Image
Outside Temperature Sensor. 4400 Ohms @ 60 F, 2200 Ohms @ 85 F.
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low coolant sensor
In Car Temp Temperature Sensor. 4400 Ohms @ 60 F, 2200 Ohms @ 85 F.
Image

MAF (Mass Air Flow) Sensor. .4 Volts @ idle, 5 Volts @ Full Throttle.
Image
Oxygen (O2) Sensor. .1 Volt Lean Mixture, .9 Volt Rich Mixture.
Image
Image
Oxygen (O2) Sensor. .1 Volt Lean Mixture, .9 Volt Rich Mixture.
does anyone have a link or detailed info, hopefully with a clear diagram, showing the location of OXYGEN SENSORS in a 1996 corvette?
Yes IM fully aware theres One in front of each catalytic converter , and One behind each catalytic converter but ID love a clear diagram or detailed pictures showing the location
TPS (Throttle Position Sensor). .54 Volts Idle, ~ 5 Volts Full Throttle.
Image
KNOCK SENSOR
Sensor Locations

Sensor
keep in mind theres DOZENS OF DIFFERENT CHEVY TEMP SENSORS, for OIL AND COOLANT AND AIR, SO BE SURE YOU SELECT THE ONE DESIGNED TO MATCH YOUR GAUGE AND APPLICATION
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Image
Image
Image
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Location
Engine Coolant Temperature Sensor. Front of engine, below Throttle Body.
Engine Oil Temperature Sensor. Left rear of engine, just above the oil filter.
Oil Pressure Sender/Switch. Top, left hand rear of engine.
Fuel Quantity Sender. Top of fuel tank, beneath filler pipe escutcheon panel.
MAT (Manifold Absolute Temperature Sensor). Underside of manifold air plenum at rear.
Outside Temperature Sensor. Right side of engine, top right corner of radiator.
In Car Temp Temperature Sensor. Coupe: above left seat near interior courtesy light, Convertible: center of cargo compartment lid.
MAF (Mass Air Flow) Sensor. Front of engine ahead of throttle body.
Oxygen (O2) Sensor. Left side of engine, in exhaust pipe.
TPS (Throttle Position Sensor). Right side of throttle body at the front[/color].[/size][/b]

mass air flow sensors and air filters

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=CXuO5OmKPyY

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sSuL58YE ... ure=relmfu

http://www.knfilters.com/MAF/massair.htm

http://www.knfilters.com/MAF/2MAFSensorVideo.htm

http://www.knfilters.com/MAF/3MAFSensorVideo.htm

http://www.knfilters.com/MAF/4MAFSensorVideo.htm

viewtopic.php?f=50&t=6134

http://www.corvettephotographs.com/c4vettes/maf.htm
Image

"Most of the C4 Corvettes used a MAF (Mass Air Flow) sensor to determine how much air is being pulled into the intake manifold. The exceptions are the 1984 Corvette that used a speed density system--a sort of predictive method of measurement---and the 1990 through 1993 C4 models which were also speed density based. In 1994, Corvette went back to the MAF based system but used the speed density approach as a back up. (1989 Bosch MAF installation shown at right).
Image
IF YOU CLEAN THE MASS AIR FLOW SENSOR YOU MUST USE THE CORRECT PRODUCT
many throttle body and carburetor spray cleaners used will leave a film that won,t burn off and will cause error codes or the wrong sensor readings

A Mass Air Flow sensor has an extremely fine wire inside its bore. The 1985 through 1989 C4 engines used a Bosch MAF sensor that heated the wire to 100 C. The 1994 and later C4 models used a AC/Delco MAF that heated the wire to 200 C. The amount of current required to reach the temperature is measured in each case. (Note: the LT-5 engine used in the ZR-1 used a speed density system and continued to use that system in 1994 and 1995 since the engines had already been made prior to the last two years of production. The ZR-1 therefore has no MAF even after Corvette went back to the MAF based system).

Theory of Operation

As the air travels past the heated wire en-route to the intake manifold, it will cool the wire and additional current is added to again heat the wire to the design temperature. Since the amount of air moving past the sensor is directly related to the amount of cooling experienced by the heated wire, a feedback condition is established whereby the exact amount of moving air is directly related to the amount of current passing through the wire and the intake air is therefore precisely measured.

Once the amount of air is known, the computer controlling the engine can add or subtract fuel as required to maintain the magic 14.7:1 air-fuel mixture resulting in the cleanest burn possible from an emissions (pollution) standpoint.

It does this by varying the "on time" of the fuel injectors. The injectors are pulsed on and off and the width of the pulse is lengthened or shortened as required. When you first start a typical engine, the pulse width is around 4 milliseconds but as soon as the engine "catches" the pulse width is shortened to about 2.2 milliseconds for idle. During operation, the measured air flow through the MAF will cause the computer to increase or decrease the pulse width as explained above.

MAF Operating Conditions

The Bosch MAF is more complex than the AC/Delco version. Both measure the air flow but the Bosch MAF has a circuit called the 'burn-off circuit' that cycles on for about 2 seconds when you shut the engine down. This circuit heats the wire to a high enough temperature to burn off any residue that may have collected on the wire during operation. If you are in a quiet area, you can hear the relays click on and then off on a 1985-1989 C4 as the burn-off cycle occurs.

There are two relays involved with the Bosch MAF: A power relay that passes current to the MAF wire during normal operation and the burn-off relay that provides the current for the cleaning cycle. Both are located on the firewall in the engine compartment, just behind the battery on the drivers side. Bad MAF power and burn-off relays can cause hard starting problems and should be changed periodically as preventative measure and any time you experience hard starting conditions.

The AC/Delco MAF has a power relay but no burn-off relay. For this reason, you should pay even closer attention to the condition of your air filter on a later model C4 than normal since a contaminated wire in a AC/Delco MAF is going to stay contaminated for the most part and cause false signals to be passed to the computer.

Also, the Bosch MAF outputs its information as a analog signal to the computer but the AC/Delco sends its signal as a digital component of varying frequency. For this reason, you cannot measure it's operation directly.

A scan tool is generally the best way to troubleshoot engine problems and with the 1994 and later Corvette, it is virtually mandatory. (An oscilloscope will also work on the AC/Delco MAF but a regular test meter will not).

MAF Problems

Faulty MAF sensors will normally light the check engine light on the drivers information center if the problem is constant and store a trouble code. If intermittent, a trouble code will still be stored as long as the battery is not disconnected.

Normally, the problem is a poor connection at the sensor and wiggling the wires, unplugging and reinserting the connector will often cure the problem.

A faulty MAF will normally cause a no start or difficult start condition and although you can eventually get the car into the "limp-home" mode in most cases, you need to attend to the problem ASAP.

AC/Delco sensors can become intermittent or give false readings if the wires become contaminated as explained above.

The MAF is a critical part of the emission control system and as such will cause the computer to react to problems very quickly, setting trouble codes and reducing performance in ways that cannot be ignored for long.

MAF Mods

The Bosch MAF is often modified by removing the two screens that are present in the front and rear of the cylinder. Removing these screens significantly increases the air flow through them and this results in more horsepower. Removing the screens is an old trick from the Corvette Challenge days in 1988 and 1989. It does work but is illegal in many states so be advised not to do anything that will get you arrested for a pollution violation.

The AC/Delco MAF is not readily modified. It is what it is but since it is a larger diameter than the Bosch, it responds well to changing the air filter to a free flowing type such as the K&N filter."

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http://www.mamotorworks.com/corvette-c4 ... 6-893.html
http://content.mamotorworks.com/pdf/601096.pdf

you will want to isolate and verify every systems functioning correctly, before proceeding to the next test.
lets assume everything's in need of tweaking until checked, if you don,t have a SHOP MANUAL, timing light, multi meter,vacuum gauge and code reader, your working at a disadvantage
each bit of info you verify provides you with clues to the cause of any problems or adds or eliminates potential areas to look into


(1)pull the plugs and post VERY clear pictures with the cylinder locations labeled .
Id suggest swapping to new AC or NGK plugs gapped at .045 as a start point.
(2)measure the battery voltage with a multi meter both before starting and at idle
(3)measure EACH individual ignition wire OHMS, end to end and post results
(4) whats the BACK PRESSURE on the exhaust at idle and 3000rpm?
(5)VERIFY the firing order, TDC and IGNITION ADVANCE CURVE
(6)clean the throttle body and IAC, reset the TPS
(7)whats your fuel pressure at idle and at 3000rpm
what does each fuel injector read in resistance?
is the fuel pressure steady?
is there fuel in any vacuum lines?
(are you sure the timings correct and youve verified TDC on the dampers CORRECT?
(8) have you verified theres no vacuum leaks?
(9) have you recently adjusted valves? you should at least check them
(10) do you have an IR temp gun?, what does each header read next to the head?

http://autospeed.com/cms/A_110895/artic ... larArticle

http://tpiparts.net/90_92_speed_density_sensors/

http://tpiparts.net/85_89_maf_sensors/

what codes are still there?
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
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Re: C4 and camaro sensor and relay/switch locations and inf

Postby bob » November 6th, 2011, 4:31 pm

http://www.classictruckshop.com/clubs/e ... /relay.htm

Image

http://www.the12volt.com/relays/relays.asp

http://www.offroaders.com/info/tech-cor ... wiring.htm

http://www.cadvision.com/blanchas/54pontiac/relay.html




Electrical - Automotive Relays

I purchased some new industrial automotive style relays for dirt cheap and immediately ran into a strange problem with the starting circuit. I determined that the relays were missing a bleed down resistor. The bleed down resistor is across the coil and it is used to help bleed down the magnetic field after you've stopped applying +12V to the coil. Automotive relays have the bleed down resistor already built in. You can read about the problem here in the starter circuit page.

3 different styles of automotive relays

A relay is a magnetically controlled switch. They are composed of two circuits: the coil and the contacts. When +12 volts is applied to the coil, a magnetic field is generated that pulls in the contacts. The contacts are the switch portion of the relay. The contacts are rated for how many amps of current they can handle. Automotive relays are typically rated for 30 amps at 12 Vdc. For example of current consumption, one halogen headlight draws about 4 amps on hi beam.

Relays are used to control high current devices such as horns, headlights, brake lights, etc.. I don't like to run high currents through 50 year old switches in the dash, so I use them to control the relay coils which only need about 1/10 the current of the contacts and let the relay contacts control the high current draw devices.

Relay wiring code

Relay pigtail socket

Image

Automotive relay pins are labelled with numbers which indicate what their purpose is and the relay pigtail has a standard color code as follow:

Coil

85: Ground - Black wire
86: +12V - White wire

NOTE: I found that in half of my pigtails, the black and white wires were reversed! It shouldn't make a difference as the coil is not polarized.

Contacts

30: Common - Blue wire
87: Normally Open (NO) - Yellow wire
87a: Normally Closed (NC) - Red wire
bob

 

Re: C4 and camaro sensor and relay/switch locations and inf

Postby grumpyvette » December 13th, 2011, 12:44 pm

IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: C4 and camaro sensor and relay/switch locations and inf

Postby grumpyvette » August 11th, 2012, 10:01 am

I FOUND THIS POSTED ON A DIFFERENT SITE

The "paperclip method" - it does more than you think, even on '96 cars!
I am posting this to clear some things up about the "paperclip" trick as it applies to later model C4's ('94-'96), and I just want to make sure nobody is in the dark about all the various features of their car's built-in diagnostic mode. I will show that it does a lot more than display codes (it's got a menu!), and I will show you what the "SYS" message means, and I also hope to clear up some major misinformation.

Specifically, there have been numerous rumors that the 1996 cars have no diagnostic mode. You can enter the '96 diagnostic mode, but the rumors say it's only a holdover from previous years and that everything shown on the screen is garbage. This is false. The 1996 cars DO have an elaborate and functional diagnostic mode, with only one major change.

Our cars have numerous computers (it calls them "modules") networked together, one of which is the PCM, which controls the engine. The root of the rumors lies in the fact that in '96, new laws mandated the PCM's protocol to change to OBD-II, which used a standardized four-digit numbering scheme for "check engine" codes, which is too big to fit on the LCD. Rather than find some other way to display that many digits, GM decided to say screw it and deleted the functions that read/clear PCM codes from the diagnostic mode. The PCM simply no longer shows up at all among the modules listed.

They forgot to mention this little tidbit in the service manual, which confused a lot of people into thinking that the whole CCM chapter does not apply to '96 cars, but other than that one detail, it does. GM did not change any of the functions involving other modules (CCM, EBTCM, etc), nor did those functions get corrupted by the switch to OBD-II; they all still show up and function correctly. Thus the majority of the diagnostic mode's power is still there in '96. I know because I checked.

-----Using diagnostic mode-----

To enter the diagnostic mode, you simply ground the diagnostic pin on your car's diagnostic connector (located near the driver's knees). Various DLC connectors were used throughout the C4's life, all with different pinouts; on '94-'96 cars, you connect the fourth pin from the left in each of the two rows of pins to one another, with a paperclip or some other conductor.

When you turn the ignition to "run," you will now be in diagnostic mode, which uses the LCD screen and the DIC (driver information center) buttons for input and output. You may start and drive the car while in diagnostic mode; in fact, the car has to be running for some of the functions to be meaningful. The only disadvantage is you will not be able to see your normal gauges while in this mode since the LCD screen will be in use.

When you start diagnostic mode, the LCD will show you any codes stored in the car's various computers. In '96, Module 1 is the CCM (main/dash computer), 4 is the PCM (engine computer, doesn't show up in '96), 7 is the RTD (computer-controlled shock absorbers, if you've got them), 9 is the EBTCM (antilock brake and traction computer), and A is the DERM (air bag computer). These are cycled through one at a time, with dashes indicating the end of codes for that module. A "C" prefix means the code is currently active, meaning that the relevant parameters are out of range right now; an "H" means the code has been stored in history but is not currently active.

Unlike the car's other electronic systems, such as PCM, ABS, air bags, etc., there is no specific "CCM" lamp to indicate a malfunction when one is present. Instead, the CCM flashes the word "SYS" three times every once in a while on the LCD whenever there are active CCM codes present. If the code thrown is one that involves only the security system, the "SECURITY" lamp will illuminate instead, or they will both flash together if it involves the Fuel Enable Data Stream.

Upon entering diagnostic mode, as mentioned, you will first see a listing of diagnostic codes for each module. Afterwards, you will enter the menu (or you can press any information center buttons to skip to the menu). Did you know there was a menu? I didn't, until I read the FSM.

You'll know you're in the menu when you see the number "1.0". The first digit, before the decimal point, refers to which module you are talking to at the moment, as numbered above. The second digit indicates the menu item. Item .0 means that computer is awaiting instructions. Item .1 displays any codes for that module and .7 clears them. This applies to all of the car's computers/modules. Note that any non-CCM codes will always show up with the "H" as in history, since the CCM does not know whether or not they are currently active.

The CCM has additional options on top of these; .2 and .3 let you cycle through the CCM's stored data and inputs, respectively, and option .4 lets you toggle each of its outputs manually (this part is fun).

To navigate the menu items, use the "gauges" and "trip odo" button. To navigate to the next or previous module, hold down the "fuel" or "trip" button for a second. To select a menu item, press "ENG MET."

One thing that I recommend doing at this point, is see if you have any EBTCM codes stored (module 9 in '96), and then delete them. You will hear the brake pressure modulator valves near the EBTCM click as it resets, and you might suddenly feel that your brakes feel and work much better than before. This was the case for me; I had a lateral accelerometer code, as well as a code from back when my Opti died making the tachometer go crazy. Neither code has come back since I cleared them, meaning that the presence of codes alone was enough to severely effect how my brake functions.

Now for the fun part: The CCM data, input, and outputs. These are options .2, .3, and .4 in the CCM module menu, respectively. After selecting any of these, press "eng met" to go to the next value and "fuel info" to go to the previous. The selections are:


Display CCM Data (Mode 1.2):
01 - Fuel Level (Gallons, tenths)
02 - Dimming Potentiometer
03 - Ambient Light Sensor
04 - Rear Defogger Timer
05 - Vehicle Speed
06 - Pass-Key
07 - Ignition Voltage
08 - Switched Voltage
09 - Cluster dimming
10 - LCD backlight dimming
11 - Radio & Climate dimming
12 - LED dimming
13 & 14 - Vehicle configuration
15 - Oil monitor count
16 - CCM version

Display CCM input status (Mode 1.3):

1 - PassKey fuel
2 - English/metric status
3 - Door key switch
4 - Right Door ajar
5 - Left door ajar
6 - key in ignition but in "off" or "acc" position
7 - hatch ajar
8 - Power door unlock
9 - Power door lock
10 - Parking lights
11 - Rear defogger input (car must be running)
12 - Seat belt switch
13 - High beam switch
14 - Low oil level switch

These values are either "1" or "0," and when toggled, the new value will be appended on to the old value (01 means it was 0 but is now 1).

Cycle CCM Outputs (Mode 1.4):

Selecting these options will manually activate the lights and sounds the CCM produces.

1 - Change oil light
2 - Check gauges indicator
3 - Fasten seatbelt indicator
4 - Security lamp
5 - High beam indicator
6 & 7 - chimes
8 - LCD blanking
9 - Defogger relay
10 - Courtesy lamp
11 - Low oil lamp
12 - Theft relay
13 - DAB relay
14 - door ajar light
15 - Horns (This will actually beep the horns, watch out!)

So there you have it; you can now dazzle and impress your friends with your car's diagnostic features, as well as test any of the circuits and systems in the interior. Please correct any factual errors I have made in this post, and if you know of any information that would be useful to add to this thread, so as to make it a centralized source for information about the late model CCM, let me know.



Here's the fan diagram which also shows the 3 fuses involved in the fan circuit.

There are 3 relays and two modes of operation when the fans run.

Both fans run at slow speed when the PCM grounds pin A11 Dark Green wire which energizes Relay #1.

Both fans run at high speed when the PCM grounds pin A11 Dark Green wire and pin A10 Dark Blue wire. (All 3 relays are energized).

I've never tried this but If you ground Pin 5 to Pin 6 on the DLC (Data Link Connector) above the drivers right knee and then turn the ignition ON, the 3 Fan relays should energize and both fans should operate at high speed.

[01|02|03|04|05|06|07|08]
[09|10|11|12|13|14|15|16]
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BTW FAULTY GROUNDS, IN MANY CARS AND ESPECIALLY NEWER CORVETTES CAUSE MANY ELECTRICAL ISSUES SO IF YOU HAVE INTERMITTENT ELECTRICAL ISSUES CHECK THEM CAREFULLY
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IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Re: C4 and camaro sensor and relay/switch locations and inf

Postby grumpyvette » August 23rd, 2012, 9:05 am

http://www.aa1car.com/library/oxygen_se ... ations.htm

http://sethirdgen.org/HO2S.htm

http://www.ngksparkplugs.com/techinfo/o ... country=US

http://tech.corvettecentral.com/2007/01 ... en-sensor/

Oxygen (O2) Sensor. .1 Volt Lean Mixture, .9 Volt Rich Mixture.
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Oxygen (O2) Sensor. .1 Volt Lean Mixture, .9 Volt Rich Mixture.
does anyone have a link or detailed info, hopefully with a clear diagram, showing the location of OXYGEN SENSORS in a 1996 corvette?
Yes IM fully aware theres One in front of each catalytic converter , and One behind each catalytic converter but ID love a clear diagram or detailed pictures showing the location

Image

knowing your true compression ratio would help, as would knowing your converter stall speed, exhaust back pressure at peak rpms and plenum vacume reading at peak rpms and your ignition timing and advance curve.
posting clear pictures of your spark plugs labeled to match the cylinders would also be useful, as would any info on jets and power valves, accelerator pump cams , and fuel pressure etc. If you were local we could work out the testing and details far easier, things like voltage, and exhaust,back pressure, fuel pressure get over looked but they can be great indicators
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related info, yes I know there,s a ton of reading in links and sub links but its also a great deal of useful info

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=52&t=181&p=215&hilit=broken+rocker+stud#p215

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=52&t=6237&p=19552&hilit=broken+rocker+stud#p19552

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=44&t=4949&p=13698&hilit=broken+rocker+stud#p13698

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=50&t=9478&p=34812&hilit=shop+manual#p34812

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=32&t=168

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=50&t=5893&p=35176&hilit=just+running+correctly#p35176

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=52&t=9687&p=36006&hilit=just+running#p36006

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=32&t=596

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=44&t=808&p=2957&hilit=running+right+tracking#p2957

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=55&t=9570&p=35327&hilit=just+running#p35327

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=70&t=4683&p=34611&hilit=just+running#p34611

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=32&t=1401&p=34392&hilit=just+running#p34392

http://forum.grumpysperformance.com/viewtopic.php?f=32&t=661
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

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Posts: 14105
Joined: September 14th, 2008, 1:40 pm
Location: florida

Re: C4 and camaro sensor and relay/switch locations and inf

Postby grumpyvette » June 14th, 2014, 12:37 pm

other related info
viewtopic.php?f=32&t=1401

viewtopic.php?f=32&t=10349&p=42530&hilit=+mass+sensor#p42530

viewtopic.php?f=32&t=2825&p=16854&hilit=+mass+sensor#p16854

viewtopic.php?f=32&t=168

viewtopic.php?f=32&t=10349&p=42530&hilit=relocating+sensor#p42530

viewtopic.php?f=32&t=2697

viewtopic.php?f=32&t=661&p=6336&hilit=+mass+sensor#p6336

viewtopic.php?f=32&t=661

viewtopic.php?f=32&t=2825

viewtopic.php?f=32&t=3154

viewtopic.php?f=32&t=590

viewtopic.php?f=32&t=607

viewtopic.php?f=32&t=596&p=14674&hilit=camaro+sensors#p14674

the search feature, is always an option here, on this site, but to save time , look at the sub links in these threads, to find sources for replacement electrical connectors, and NAPA can frequently ORDER replacement connectors for repairs at about 3- 5 times the cost youll find them at else ware, but at times getting the part the next day beats waiting a week so the price may be justified. if its a connector thats likely to break frequently buy extras, and have them handy

viewtopic.php?f=36&t=3105&p=8272&hilit=connectors+pigtails#p8272

viewtopic.php?f=32&t=168&p=41767&hilit=connectors+pigtails#p41767
IF YOU CAN,T SMOKE THE TIRES AT WILL,FROM A 60 MPH ROLLING START YOUR ENGINE NEEDS MORE WORK!!"!
IF YOU CAN , YOU NEED BETTER TIRES AND YOUR SUSPENSION NEEDS MORE WORK!!
grumpyvette

User avatar
Site Admin
Site Admin
 
Posts: 14105
Joined: September 14th, 2008, 1:40 pm
Location: florida


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